The Business of Tomorrow (and the Years After) – INFOGRAPHIC

Brian Wallace, Founder & President, NowSourcing

What will the jobs of the future look like?

This is a question that is on the mind of mankind since the dawn of time. We often try our best to predict the unpredictable by using what we know from the past and what we know now. In terms of business, a similar question can be raised about what work will look like in the future.

(Note: These are educated projections given observations of the current workforce and are subject to change) 

Given the popularity of remote work, there will be a priority to create flexible workspaces. Companies will offer a variety of options for work styles so employees can choose where to work so they can be more productive and efficient. As small businesses are the backbone of a functioning society, in the next few years, these small businesses will receive the spotlight in the job market. They will flourish and collaborate, without the cost of bigger businesses.

Work will be based on teams and collaborations where everyone can be a leader. Even though there will still be clear job roles, these roles will function less like a totem pole and more like planks on a bridge. Everyone has a role to play and they all are equally valuable to the organization.  Workers at all levels will use smart assistants, like Siri or Alexa, to sort and prioritize tasks. As artificial intelligence and technology take over more aspects of work, creativity and human relationships will become key to successful careers

It’s important to get the job done and for the rest of the workers to do the same. Therefore to boost morale and create healthy work environments, future workplaces will be designed with comfort in mind. There will be nap rooms where employees can rest and recharge to finish their shifts strong. There will be days like “Bring Your Pet to Work Day” to cheer up people when they are down. 

To create deeper connections, there will be informal get-togethers between employees online. This could be done as simply as a Zoom call to more advanced mediums like VR and AR headsets. Slowly breaking down location barriers and building bridges to new relationships with colleagues. These connections across different groups and locations will share ideas and brainstorm to create solutions that will solve more complex problems than brainstorming in-house.

The diversity of changing workplaces will demand a new executive role, working to maintain company culture. Not only that but the Chief of Work would work to build a culture of top talent as well as create a healthy and functioning company culture. 

Jobs Of The Future
Source: ExecutivePlacements.com


Brian WallaceAbout the Author: Brian Wallace is the Founder and President of NowSourcing, an industry leading infographic design agency in Louisville, KY and Cincinnati, OH which works with companies ranging from startups to Fortune 500s. Brian runs #LinkedInLocal events, hosts the Next Action Podcast, and has been named a Google Small Business Adviser for 2016-present. Follow Brian Wallace on LinkedIn as well as Twitter.




5 Ways You Can Increase Your Sources Of Passive Income 

5 Ways You Can Increase Your Sources Of Passive Income 

 

Brian Wallace, Founder & President, NowSourcing

Whether you’re looking to start a side business or just want to increase your monthly income, residual income may be a wonderful strategy to help you produce extra cash flow. 

You could decide to leave your primary job while still making money from it if you can establish a reliable passive income source. Anyhow, having a steady side income increases your sense of security.

1.   Rent An AirBNB

 Without a doubt, investing in real estate can profit you good enough in the long term. Because you can make money using a property you own, Airbnb is fantastic. Preparing your home, marketing it, and cleaning up after visitors does take some upfront labor, but other than that, it’s quite passive. 

Offering your visitors the option to make digital payments and transactions by exchanging cryptocurrencies on the bitcoin loophole will naturally boost your chances of making money online if you have a more opulent or spacious air BNB location.

2.   Buy A Vending or ATM Machine

Another excellent low-maintenance small business concept is vending machines. Vending machines are available at colleges, outside of workplaces, etc. People frequently eat snacks, and you will receive a little portion of the sale of each item. 

People may want cash immediately when they are out and about in a restaurant or bar or when they frequent a place that only accepts cash. If you run an ATM service and put your ATMs in busy areas, you may start to get a passive income from surcharge fees.

3.   Write An EBook

An e-book means publishing your book online in digital stores. With low costs of print and publishing, you can now leverage this platform and publish your own written Ebook to put your book in front of potentially millions of potential buyers to publish an e-book. 

4.   Trade Stocks Online

Corporations are required to pay their shareholders on a regular basis. A share must be owned by you in order to earn a dividend payout from a firm. Quarterly payouts are made by businesses from their earnings. 

The more shares you hold, the bigger your payment will be since dividends are distributed per share of stock. You may execute trades and technology infrastructure online through bitcoin loophole pro to routinely make money off of your timely trades click here to get more details.

5.   Have A Dropshipping Store

One of the finest passive income opportunities, even if you don’t have much in the way of cash flow to start with, is dropshipping. 

The drop-shipping business strategy entails setting up an online store where clients can explore and purchase goods. Dropshipping is intriguing since you might not see or handle the actual things you sell.

Conclusion 

There are only so many hours in the day, so finding methods to increase your revenue might provide you with the flexibility you need to take your company to the next level. Adding passive revenue streams with various underlying economics can provide you with the opportunity to explore whatever level that is for you.


Brian WallaceAbout the Author: Brian Wallace is the Founder and President of NowSourcing, an industry leading infographic design agency in Louisville, KY and Cincinnati, OH which works with companies ranging from startups to Fortune 500s. Brian runs #LinkedInLocal events, hosts the Next Action Podcast, and has been named a Google Small Business Adviser for 2016-present. Follow Brian Wallace on LinkedIn as well as Twitter.

 




7 Digital PR and Marketing Trends for 2023

 

Sally Falkow, CEO, Meritus Media

2023 is right around the corner. A new year always brings unknowns, but this year preparing your digital PR and marketing strategy is more important than ever. 

The current economic climate has been tough and financial experts warn of a recession in 2023.  The Conference Board predicts a 96 percent likelihood of a recession in the US within the next 12 months, based on their probability model. 

These six Digital PR and marketing trends can help you thrive in 2023.

  • Social Media Audit – Gather Insights and Intelligence 

The more you know about your customers, clients, employees, and competitors, they better your planning will be.  You need to understand your potential clients’ mindset and craft a business strategy that provides what they need and want. Find gaps and threats you would otherwise not have known about. In depth insights can uncover opportunities that allow you to thrive in a tough economy.

  • Build a community of loyal advocates

Use what you learn in your social audit to identify the audience most likely to support you in 2023. You now have the data. Use it to attract and gather a strong community of people who like and trust your brand. Facebook is still an excellent place to do this. Over 60 percent of people worldwide are on Facebook and almost three billion users visit the site every month! While many younger people have moved on to other platforms, Facebook is still the best place to effectively reach your audience. Facebook’s demographic data allow you to use their knowledge to inform your PR and marketing choices and tailor the type of content you share in your posts, stories, and ads.

  • Story-driven Content Visualization

Sixty-five percent of people are visual learners and the use of color in visual increase their desire to read that content by 80 percent!  So, not only does your content have to be tailored specifically for your audience – their needs, desires, questions, and intent – it also must be visually appealing.  Adding data visualizations, infographics, images, and videos to your text not only makes it more interesting and attractive, but it can help your message to be absorbed better too. Your 2023 digital PR and marketing strategy will require excellent graphic design. Just popping a stock image on a story will no longer be enough. Using the information you gathered in your intelligence phase, create stories that touch your audience and deliver it with visuals that extend and enhance their experience of the content. 

  • Video 

Each year video usage online continues to grow. If a picture is worth a thousand words a video really brings a story to life. The current average viewer spends 100 minutes a day watching digital videos. The most popular videos are entertainment and music, but there is also a growing demand for livestreams and tutorials rank. They rank third and fourth for the types of videos watched.  Livestreams help to foster the feeling of connectedness and community with your audience.  Tutorials answer questions and improve their understanding of your brand and your products. Short, animated videos can help you build long-term relationships with customers and promote your products and services creatively

  • Affinity and Trust

A successful digital PR and marketing strategy is never one-and-done. One of the most important factors in building affinity and trust is to stay connected and keep listening   Once you build that audience, don’t abandon it.  Keep you finger on the pulse and learn more day-by-day. People respond to brands who share their goals and values. Affinity is the feeling your audience gets from a constant interaction with you. The more you know about your audience, the better your content will be. The more consistently you show up, the more affinity and trust there will be. 

  • Search Engine Optimization -Position Zero and Featured Snippets

Content has always been an important part of digital PR and marketing, but even though it’s more than 20 years since we’ve had search engines, SEO is still not a staple skill for PR pros.  Yet nothing could be more important.  No matter how smart you are at identifying audiences and creating stunning content if no one sees it, it’s useless.

Google has a specific set of content guidelines. Learn what their latest updates and requirements are. Craft every piece of content with SEO in mind.  Aim to have your content found and seen by as many of the right people as possible. One of the changes is the focus on “position zero” and featured snippets. This gives the searcher what they were looking for right on page one of Google. How do you get your content ranked in these coveted spots?

  • Analytics 

In this digital age it is possible to track everything.  And in the current climate, it’s vital to keep your finger on the pulse of your digital PR and marketing campaigns. Don’t wait till the end to discover that it didn’t work.  Set measurable goals and start tracking right away.  Course-correct if you are not making headway and reaching your milestones.  Performance tracking will show which campaigns work and which ones need to be changed. In a recent Meritus Media survey, learning analytics and how to track results was the number two skill PR people wanted to learn. Now would be a perfect time to do that. 




A Conversation with Molly Ball, Author, Pelosi

 

 

Join Michael as he speaks with Molly Ball, author of the biography, Pelosi, about Speaker Pelosi’s decision to step down from her leadership role in the House of Representatives. Molly, having spoken to the Speaker just after her floor speech announcing her decision will offer her understanding of what led to Pelosi’s decision, her expectations for the democrats and the upcoming Congress, and her reflections of Speaker Pelosi’s legacy. This conversation will be followed by an encore presentation of Michael’s full interview with Molly discussing her Pelosi biography.

Guest

Molly Ball

National Political Correspondent, TIME

Molly Ball is the National Political Correspondent for TIME, covering campaigns, the White House, political personalities and policy debates across America. She is also a political analyst for CNN and frequent television and radio commentator.

Prior to joining TIME, she was a staff writer covering U.S. politics for The Atlantic. She previously reported for Politico, the Las Vegas Review-Journal, and the Las Vegas Sun. She has worked for newspapers in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Cambodia, as well as the New York Times and the Washington Post.

She has received numerous awards for her political coverage, including the Gerald R. Ford Prize for Distinguished Reporting on the Presidency, the Toner Prize for Excellence in Political Reporting, the Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi Award, the Sandy Hume Memorial Award for Excellence in Political Journalism, and the Lee Walczak Award for Political Analysis.

A graduate of Yale University, she was a Knight-Wallace journalism fellow at the University of Michigan in 2009. In 2007, she won $100,000 on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire.

Ball grew up in Idaho and Colorado. She lives in Virginia with her husband and three children.

Follow Molly on Twitter: @mollyesque

Host

Michael Zeldin

Michael Zeldin is a well-known and highly-regarded TV and radio analyst/commentator. He has covered many high-profile matters, including the Clinton impeachment proceedings, the Gore v. Bush court challenges, Special Counsel Robert Muller’s investigation of interference in the 2016 presidential election, and the Trump impeachment proceedings. 

In 2019, Michael was a Resident Fellow at the Institute of Politics at the Harvard Kennedy School, where he taught a study group on Independent Investigations of Presidents.

Previously, Michael was a federal prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Justice. He also served as Deputy Independent/ Independent Counsel, investigating allegations of tampering with presidential candidate Bill Clinton’s passport files, and as Deputy Chief Counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives, Foreign Affairs Committee, October Surprise Task Force, investigating the handling of the American hostage situation in Iran.

Michael is a prolific writer and has published Op-ed pieces for CNN.com, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Hill, The Washington Times, and The Washington Post.

Follow Michael on Twitter: @MichaelZeldin




Invest In Yourself Today to Grow as a Woman Leader: Strategize. Grow. Connect.

Invest In Yourself Today to Grow as a Woman Leader

 

Research by the Knowledge Academy reveals that companies are 18% more likely to send men on work-related training than women. Is it that organizations are offering more training to men? Or is it that women are not requesting outside training as often as men? 

It appears to be the latter, according to Linda Babcock, a professor of economics at Carnegie Mellon University, and the author of “Women Don’t Ask”. Women are socialized from an early age not to promote their own interests and to focus instead on the needs of others. Men, on the other hand, are taught that they can ask for more. 

Not only is this not good for women, but it is not good for organizations. Countless studies from McKinsey, Harvard and other respected research organizations have proven that gender diversity at all levels of management and leadership create the most profitable and effective organizations.  

GW CEPL offers programs for women at every level of their leadership journey to help address the early socialized habits, as well as the workplace and life challenges that often hold women back from pursuing increased responsibility, while supporting their growth and development.

Live online programs are known for their interactive discussions and networking among the participants, as well as its critical, career-changing content. 

#WRISE gives high-potential women leaders at the start of their careers the tools to enable management success, while addressing limiting beliefs that may be holding them back.

#EWLP is designed for experienced executives who have potential for greater leadership responsibilities. Topics covered include executive presence, negotiations, resilience, growth mindset and more! 

#GWLP provides game-changing leadership strategies that will transform your mindset and expand your sphere of influence as a woman leader. Program is designed for global executives.

 




Welcome to the Global Women’s Leadership Channel, presented by The George Washington University’s Center for Excellence in Public Leadership (VIDEO)

 

This platform was created for global women leaders at all levels – across the public, private and non-profit sectors. Here you will find tools, strategies and the latest research  to help you overcome challenges, bias and  self-limiting beliefs that so often hold women back from both contributing fully and moving up in their organizations. 

Together with contributing authors and influencers we address such topics as vision, communication, relationship building, executive presence, mindset, courage and confidence as it relates to women’s growth and success.


The Center of Excellence in Public Leadership at George Washington University (GW CEPL) offers programs for women at every level of their leadership journey to help address the early socialized habits, as well as the workplace and life challenges that often hold women back from pursuing increased responsibility, while supporting their growth and development.

Live online programs are known for their interactive discussions and networking among the participants, as well as its critical, career-changing content. Click here to learn more:

Women Leaders on the Rise Program (#WRISE) gives high-potential women leaders at the start of their careers the tools to enable management success, while addressing limiting beliefs that may be holding them back.

Executive Women’s Leadership Program (#EWLP) is designed for experienced executives who have potential for greater leadership responsibilities. Topics covered include executive presence, negotiations, resilience, growth mindset and more!

Global Women’s Leadership Program (#GWLP) provides game-changing leadership strategies that will transform your mindset and expand your sphere of influence as a woman leader. Program is designed for global executives.




How to Put Employee Stories at the Center of Your Employer Brand

How to put employee stories at the center of your employer brand - Ragan Comms

At Ragan’s Future of Communications Conference, comms pros weighed in on how they highlight their employee experiences.

Sean Devlin

When trying to highlight the best parts of your company, the best way to tell your organization’s story is to focus on the employees who live your culture every day. At Ragan’s Future of Communications Conference, we were lucky enough to hear from three comms pros on how they find the best employee stories within their companies.

Who should you highlight?

When you’re thinking about who to showcase when you’re telling the story of your employee experience, it’s important to think about how your company values are reflected through your workers. Consider your employees as external voices of your organization’s values and missions.

“We’re a values-driven company,” said Amanda Coffee, director, global corporate communications at PayPal. “When we want to discuss and bring those values to life, we try to leverage our employees as spokespeople. We curate our employee case studies by looking at our values and reviewing what powerful employee stories we have on hand that map to those values and undertake a matchmaking process based on media trends.”

Your most enthusiastic employees are also likely to paint a vibrant picture of your company.

“It’s really important to have those employee testimonials,” said Michael Diaz, omnichannel content lead at Merck Animal Health. “Studies have shown employee testimonials have a three-fold greater impact than those from outsiders. What we’re looking for are people that are passionate about the company and espouse our core values.”

Continue reading here…

 




Hapi CEO Adi Y. Segal on the Power of Active Listening

The Power of Active Listening

 

Adi Y. Segal, CEO, Hapi

When a senior citizen dials 911, the assumption is that they must be having a medical emergency. But more often than you might think the reason for the call is not that at all — they’re just lonely and want someone to talk to. And it’s not just older adults who seek a sense of belonging.

This basic human need for connection is at the heart of our Hapi app. Designed to give people the opportunity to talk or vent about anything from career woes to school and relationships, after having the Hapi experience, participants really feel better.

At Hapi, our mission is to give people a sense of belonging. And now we’re excited to launch a service for business that can grow your revenue, retain employees, turn your team into listening leaders – through the power of active listening. Studies show that team members and managers who listen well gain a better understanding of what’s important to clients and partners, experience less sales churn, and have greater opportunities to cross sell and up sell. But first I’d like to share some true stories about the power of listening.

Hapi’s listeners are trained in “active listening” techniques that put an emphasis on fully concentrating on what a person is saying and following up on key points of the conversation. At no time does a Hapi caller feel like they’re talking to the wall. It’s not therapy, but it results in a feeling I like to call “mental hygiene.” And it works. We’ve found through surveys of our first-time users that 95% of them feel so good about the experience they call again. That’s led to thousands of phone calls racking up 1.5 million minutes of active listening so far.

The Loneliness Epidemic

But why do we even need an app like Hapi? That’s simple. Unfortunately, we’re in the midst of a loneliness epidemic. According to a recent survey, up to 75% of Americans struggle with loneliness. US Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy says lonely people risk higher rates of depression, anxiety, cardiovascular illness, dementia, and sleep disturbances.

Continue reading here…

 




Tips for Getting What You Want Before You Break Up at Work – ‘Breaking Up is Hard to Do’

Leslie GrossmanLeslie Grossman, Faculty Director, Women’s Leadership Programs, GW Center for Excellence in Public Leadership & Founder, Her Circle Leadership

‘Breaking up is Hard to Do’ – the top 40-hits song by Neil Sedaka was huge in the Sixties and Seventies. In 2022, breaking up is back! It’s returned again in what McKinsey & Company is calling “The Great Break up” only this time women are not finding it ‘hard to do”. This time women are breaking up with their companies, not their boyfriends. Most women would prefer not to break up, but according to research, companies are making it more difficult for women to advance than before the pandemic. Women are reporting that they are suffering from belittling microaggressions, such as having their judgment questioned, and assumptions that because they are parenting, they are not working at full capacity. Here are some things for women to think about before deciding to break up with their company….

According to the McKinsey Women in the Workplace 2022 Report, women have taken on the hard job of doing more than ever, including supporting employee well-being and fostering inclusion, but they are not being acknowledged for this additional work. Women also want to work for companies that value flexibility, employee well-being, diversity, equity and inclusion. Women would prefer to continue working in their leadership positions if their organizations would provide the right conditions.

What can companies do to stop the exodus of valuable female employees and leaders?

Companies need to understand this research, do the work of changing their cultures and make sure that this culture shift applies on all levels of the organization.

What can women do before they resort to breaking up?

Here’s a few tips for women to try before slamming the door on their current positions. While there’s no 100% guarantee things will change, many women have reported success with these strategies.

  1. Communicate. Let your manager or leader know what you want and need to be productive and happy. Too often women don’t speak up and say what they want and need. Many leaders are reasonable, but if you don’t explain your situation and your work style, they won’t know them. Speak up.

  2. If you work remote or hybrid, schedule in-person meetings with your leader on days they are in the office (ask them) at least 1-2 times each month. Have a deeper conversation about your work including the results you are getting and how you are engaging and supporting your direct reports and peers. Men tend to update each other in an informal way, dropping by a leaders’ office or over a beer after work, in addition to scheduled in office meetings. This gives men a leadership advantage. Women need a different approach as described above.

  3. Attend in-person events selectively. Choose events where you can meet influencers, leaders and possible sponsors. Put your best foot forward speaking with confidence, asking questions about their work and letting them know what you are up to from a positive point of view. Follow-up with a note and a zoom one-to-one chat when you make a valuable connection.


The Center of Excellence in Public Leadership at George Washington University (GW CEPL) offers programs for women at every level of their leadership journey to help address the early socialized habits, as well as the workplace and life challenges that often hold women back from pursuing increased responsibility, while supporting their growth and development.

Live online programs are known for their interactive discussions and networking among the participants, as well as its critical, career-changing content. Click here to learn more:

Women Leaders on the Rise Program (#WRISE) gives high-potential women leaders at the start of their careers the tools to enable management success, while addressing limiting beliefs that may be holding them back.Executive Women’s Leadership Program (#EWLP) is designed for experienced executives who have potential for greater leadership responsibilities. Topics covered include executive presence, negotiations, resilience, growth mindset and more!

Global Women’s Leadership Program (#GWLP) provides game-changing leadership strategies that will transform your mindset and expand your sphere of influence as a woman leader. Program is designed for global executives.




Knowing the Difference Between Impactful and Cliché

Orsi Korman, Account Director, Content, Red Havas 

National Cliché Day is observed on Nov. 3, along with National Sandwich Day. I only became aware of this riveting fact last week thanks to a morning show host I was listening to in the car, who asked callers to share their favorites in both categories — with countless comical and thought-provoking, alas not very memorable results. For example, something being a piece of cake or the toast of the town makes as much sense as taking everything with a pinch of salt, but then you win some, you lose some. 

So cliché!

A cliché is a phrase, idiom or artistic element that is so overused in everyday life that it has lost its original impact. The word itself is a French term dating back to the 19th century that meant “to produce or print in stereotype.” From conversations to speeches, movies, music and the internet — especially politics or celebrity news — we are exposed to them regularly. And, while they will often draw eyerolls or loud sighs, clichés can also be entertaining because they are so predictable, like a kid in a candy store.

Most clichés start out as highly impactful and transformative messages that have a memorable effect on their audience the first time they are seen or heard. Just think “you’ll miss 100% of the shots you don’t take” or “you have to look through the rain to see the rainbow” or “life is what happens while you’re busy making other plans.” Similarly to catchy hit songs that are played too often, these clichés have such great initial popularity that people start using them over and over again until they become stale, annoying and dead as a doornail

How to recognize the cliché trap

Along with the jargon, corporate speak and latest buzzwords, clichés are notably present in corporate communications. From the employee of the month who always has a smile on their face to the talented executive who is living proof that anything is possible with hard work and dedication, organizations are pivoting back to their core competencies and transforming their industries, with leaders leaning in and seeing people as their greatest asset, and everyone working together to build customer-centric and data-driven businesses that are well positioned to strike the right balance between profitable growth and environmental stewardship, knowing they can work smarter, not harder.

The first step is recognizing that you are about to use — or have been using — a cliché, as opposed to just employing your fresh, engaging and insightful organizational narrative and supporting messages. Review your copy carefully to make sure all the points are clear, specific and unambiguously non-cliché. It may also be worthwhile to test your key messages with a few employees and/or customers to ensure those stay fresh, engaging and free of clichés. Unless you are planning to use a cliché as a literary tool, the next step is changing it. Consider whether it is an unnecessary filler or a necessary element. If you deem it unnecessary, delete it. If you feel it is necessary to move your story forward, search for synonyms that could work in its place, giving it 110%.

How to use it in a sentence

While it is very easy to cross into cliché territory unintentionally, sometimes it is either fun or necessary to do so on purpose. Clichés can simplify, characterize, facilitate conversation and help connect with your audience. For example, if you are writing for baby boomers, “kids today” will work well, whereas millennials are more likely to relate to something like “adulting is hard.” Above all, everyone understands a true cliché and it has the power to convey your point quickly and easily, so you can take it or leave it.

While “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery,” irony is also a great form of humor you can employ by using clichés in your communications thoughtfully and appropriately — making sure they will resonate with your audience. Otherwise communications that use clichés unironically may be seen as lacking inspiration or originality. If that happens, it is what it is.

To be honest, ignorance is bliss when it comes to clichés. While all that glitters is not gold, there is plenty of fish in the sea to make your copy stand out, so at the end of the day, if you want to think outside the box and take the bull by the horns — or the tiger by the tail, — be sure to walk before you run as you are wearing many hats so you can hit the ground running and not become a loose cannon creating a storm in a teacup by opening that can of worms, because what goes around comes around, you know what I mean?


Orsi JormanAbout the Author: Orsi supports content creation and content strategy for high-profile corporate, consumer and cause clients of Red Havas — and she could not be happier. Her specialties include writing, editing, ghostwriting, blogging, marketing, digital/social and experiential, all in AP style.




The Power of Influence Networks on Career and Company Launches (INFOGRAPHIC)

Brian Wallace, Founder & President, NowSourcing

Networking is paramount in business. For professionals at any stage in their career, who you know matters far more than what. When you network with established professionals, it can lead to informational interviews, access to exclusive job postings, and more. For aspiring entrepreneurs, your network is the first place to look for early stage capital investments. 

At the foundation of many professionals’ networks are their alumni groups. Both colleges and corporations invest in strong influence networks for their former students/employees. For universities, alumni networks are a key source of fundraising. Meanwhile, businesses use their alumni for referrals, business development, and connecting mentees with mentors. 98% of Fortune 500 companies maintain active alumni programs. 

Investing in lifelong relationships leads to measurable benefits. For companies, their relationship with former employees can increase current revenue, product innovation, and employer attractiveness. Businesses that actively engage alumni see up to a 44% increase in their net new business. An engaged alumni delivers a 10% increase in brand sentiment. For certain businesses, using alumni as brand advocates is worth at least 5 times as much as an average customer.

What does this mean for individual alumni members? Alums can use the network their alma mater has developed to find true community, mentors, and even discounted sports tickets. To connect with old classmates and coworkers, keep the alumni network updated about life events. Tell your college’s alumni magazine when you change jobs or launch a startup. Volunteer with your local alumni group for the opportunity to (re)connect face to face. Don’t forget to give as much as you get from your network. Share the wisdom you’ve gained from your career during alumni events such as webinars.

In launching a business, these connections become especially important. In a venture capital study covering 19 years, founders and investors attended the same college ⅓ of the time. This indicates that investors are more likely to invest in startups founded by people from their alma mater. Shared education networks are more important than school quality and shared geography in the early stage. As a result, the size of your alumni network could be the determining factor in getting a business venture off the ground. If you have a small college network, supplement it with former coworkers.

Modern tools like LinkedIn make it easier than ever to connect with alumni. Never let the opportunity to connect with another professional pass.

 

The Power of Influence Networks
Infographic provided by: AcademicInfluence.com


Brian WallaceAbout the Author: Brian Wallace is the Founder and President of NowSourcing, an industry leading infographic design agency in Louisville, KY and Cincinnati, OH which works with companies ranging from startups to Fortune 500s. Brian runs #LinkedInLocal events, hosts the Next Action Podcast, and has been named a Google Small Business Adviser for 2016-present. Follow Brian Wallace on LinkedIn as well as Twitter.




How Purpose Communications Can Nurture Employee Loyalty

How Purpose Communications Can Nurture Employee Loyalty

 

 

Employees are the lifeblood of any organization, and it’s important to nurture their loyalty in order to create safe environments that keep them happy and productive.

Isis Simpson-Mersha

Purpose communications can play a big role in this process by helping employees identify a sense of meaning and purpose in their work.

By communicating a sense of purpose to employees, employers can emphasize the importance of the work being done and why it matters to the business. Beyond giving employees something to take pride in, purpose can make them feel valued and motivated to work to the best of their abilities.

At Ragan’s 2022 Future of Communications Conference recently held in New York City, New York, Curtis Sparrer, principal at Bospar PR discussed the employee benefits of purpose communications with a panel with speakers that included Terez Hanhan, programs and research manager for Born This Way Foundation, Ben Cumming, communications director for Responsible Business Initiative for Justice and Danielle Brigida, senior director of wildlife communications and strategy at the World Wildlife Fund.

Sparrer led the panel in conversation around how incorporating employee listening and embedding purpose communications across business functions can positively impact employee retention and your bottom line through three areas: collaboration, measurement and feedback.

Continue reading here…




3 Ways Blockchain Has Improved Our Lifestyle

What to Look for in Blockchain Consulting 

 

Brian Wallace, Founder & President, NowSourcing

Given its inherent capabilities for immutable, transparent, decentralized, and extremely efficient ways of recording and exchanging data and transactions, blockchain is fundamentally altering practically every business. This has major implications for businesses, including managing the global supply chain, executing interbank transactions, and even purchasing and the sale of the property. 

We may benefit from the many advantages of cryptocurrency AI technologies without needing to comprehend the highly technical components that make it function, as this technology gains credibility with each successful use.

1.   Travel and Tourism

Traveling typically broadens perspectives, fosters understanding, and is enjoyable. In addition, the tourism industry is a major economic driver for many countries worldwide. Tourism is one of the most lucrative yet least regulated businesses, but thanks to blockchain, transparency, efficiency, and convenience can now be placed directly in the hands of visitors. 

Blockchain makes it possible to design one-of-a-kind travel experiences while cutting ties with external, centralized sources of information that may be manipulated. Tourism companies offer secure trade opportunities to travelers and tourists. To make a secure transaction through the bitcoin era you can click here for more details , travelers can pay for flight bookings, hotels, food, etc through the likes of cryptocurrencies.    

2.   Social Life

New and improved methods of social interaction between individuals and society are being created via blockchain technology. Any technology that increases efficiency lowers costs, fosters transparency, and has a positive social impact is unquestionably a valuable development. Blockchain-powered companies and organizations are where we may concentrate our authority to vote with our money when it comes to trying to live as thoughtful beings and ethical consumers. 

As we all know, provenance, and transparency in traceability are one of the most important components of fair trade. Since there is no method to identify authenticity, not only may it result in substantial financial losses but also in the loss of major customer goodwill, not really being able to confirm and monitor the origin of an item can be extremely damaging.

3.   Revised Medical Practices

The industry is now being transformed by blockchain. Blockchain solutions make it easier to manage massive medical information while protecting personal rights and compliance with regulations. They give doctors, clinical researchers, and pharmacists access to safe and trustworthy electronic health records. 

Each step in the procedure may be saved and time-stamped by using a blockchain-based system. AI technology that provides blockchain services is used by hospitals and medical institutes to track and trade crypto assets. Private medical hospitals tend to accept trade payments through the bitcoin era from their patients and clients. This practice is adopted by a great many pharmaceutical companies and hospitals that believe in offering the latest tech opportunities to their customers.

Conclusion

Blockchain development will undoubtedly be slowed down by several businesses and people, but widespread acceptance is unavoidable.

Any new technology has the potential to be abused, therefore rather than fighting blockchain advances, we should take precautions to prevent their exploitation for evil causes that don’t benefit mankind. Blockchain has a huge potential to enhance our lives now and in the future. To harness this promising technology for greater benefit, we should embrace it and carefully direct its trajectory.


Brian WallaceAbout the Author: Brian Wallace is the Founder and President of NowSourcing, an industry leading infographic design agency in Louisville, KY and Cincinnati, OH which works with companies ranging from startups to Fortune 500s. Brian runs #LinkedInLocal events, hosts the Next Action Podcast, and has been named a Google Small Business Adviser for 2016-present. Follow Brian Wallace on LinkedIn as well as Twitter. 

 




Baseball Pitchers Hate Homeruns, While in PR Pitchers Love When They Hit Jaw-Dropping Homerun Headlines

Baseball Pitchers Hate Homeruns, While in PR Pitchers Love When They Hit Jaw-Dropping Homerun Headlines

Tom Madden,  Founder & CEO, TransMedia Group

Here are some media pitching examples from my latest book WORDSHINE MAN.

Some are calling them exemplary that are among many in my highly available new book, jumping up and down and pounding its front cover chest on Amazon.  

They include these three pitches I made on behalf of a guy already serving 20 years in a Texas prison for a murder that recently surfacing evidence is showing he couldn’t have committed:

IS LIFE IN PRISON ANOTHER KNEE ON THE INNOCENT BLACK MAN’S NECK UNTIL HE CAN’T BREATHE?

LAMAR BURKS MURDER CONVICTION UNDER REVIEW AFTER MAN ADMITS ON-CAMERA HE WAS THE SHOOTER, NOT BURKS WHO WASN’T EVEN AT THE SCENE 22 YEARS AGO IN HOUSTON

MAY THE LIBERTY BELL RING OUT AGAIN FOR FREEDOM FOR THOSE IMPRISONED UNJUSTLY

Now here’s how Chapter 9 starts in WORDSHINE MAN:

C’mon (Benjamin) Crump. C’mon truth, C’mon justice, PR is rooting for you.

Vindicating and releasing Lamar from prison will be the biggest feather in PR’s cap.  And I’ll happily offer a toast to justice with a double shot of Redemption Rye. 

To whomever speaks pejoratively about PR—such as, is this true or just PR—I would say PR  can perform nobly and be almost religiously redemptive when empowered by a shot of truth on the rocks with a splash of justice.  

Now, here’s my pitch to you:  Buy a copy of WORDSHINE MAN and scoop up lots of tips about how to make your writing more inviting.


Thomas MaddenAbout the Author: Tom Madden is an author of countless articles, blogs and five books yet still finds time to pitch media stories about clients of his award-winning PR firm, TransMedia Group headquartered in Boca Raton, Florida.  

 




A Conversation with Hugh Eakin, Author, ‘Picasso’s War; How Modern Art Came to America.’ With Special Guest Professor Philip Eliasoph

 

Join Michael in his discussion with Hugh Eakin about his new book Picasso’s War, How Modern Art Came to America which recounts the determined effort of a tiny group of people who, for nearly 30 years, fought to bring modern art to the United States impeded by war, economic crises, and a deeply skeptical public. 

Joining Michael as a special guest to help facilitate this conversation is Dr. Philip Eliasoph, Professor of Art History and Visual Culture at Fairfield University in Fairfield, Connecticut.

Guests

Hugh Eakin

Hugh Eakin, a senior editor at Foreign Affairs, has written about museums and the art world for The New York Review of Books, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and The New York Times.

About Picasso’s War

“Picasso’s War is the never-before-told story about how a single exhibition, a decade in the making, irrevocably changed American taste, and in doing so saved dozens of the twentieth century’s most enduring artworks from the Nazis. Through a deft combination of new scholarship and vivid storytelling, Hugh Eakin shows how two men and their obsession with Picasso changed the art world forever.

In January 1939, Pablo Picasso was renowned in Europe but disdained by many in the United States. One year later, Americans across the country were clamoring to see his art. How did the controversial leader of the Paris avant-garde break through to the heart of American culture?

The answer begins a generation earlier, when a renegade Irish American lawyer named John Quinn set out to build the greatest collection of Picassos in existence. His dream of a museum to house them died with him, until it was rediscovered by Alfred H. Barr, Jr., a cultural visionary who, at the age of twenty-seven, became the director of New York’s new Museum of Modern Art.”

 

Dr. Philip Eliasoph

Professor of Art History & Visual Culture, Dept of Visual & Performing Arts. As founder of Fairfield’s Art History program (1975), Professor Eliasoph has been devoted to expanding students’ knowledge, understanding and direct observation of world art. Sharing his passion for the history of art, he has focused on western art in the traditional and revolutionary contexts. Publishing on Renaissance models, ‘bel disegno’ academic, canonical methods, his writing and public views converge on the muscular shifts of mid century American art styles – from Social Realism to avant-gardist Abstract Expressionism. In his critique of recycling styles, he proposes a history of art without labels, periods, or categorizations. More broadly, his lectures and museum tours are based on the continuum of style/zeitgeist progress from antiquity to the cyber age. The heritage of painting, sculpture, architecture and mass media as revealing ‘mirrors of time, place, and society.’ Combining Ignatian inspired ‘discernment’ with the humanistic qualities of aesthetic enjoyment, his lively, dynamic talks expand the pleasures of viewing the visual arts. Setting out with basic questions – speaking with freshman students or senior, lifelong art lovers, we come to explore: ‘what is Art?’* ‘why does humanity treasure its values?’* ‘how can I learn to actively critique, analyze and appreciate art as part of my own intellectual, emotional, and spiritual growth as a fully realized human being”?

In sync with an educated audience’s aspirations to follow Jefferson’s idea of ‘life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,’ he hopes to inspire and delight art enthusiasts of all ages. Often invited as a public lecturer, connoisseur and animated raconteur, his hope is to share his own artistic journeys as multi-dimensional ‘classroom/museum without walls.’ With decades of ‘in country’ art directed programs, he has escorted thousands of art pilgrims to museums, cultural landmarks, world heritage sites throughout the US and Europe. After a career as a regional art critic, publishing reviews for daily newspapers and magazines, he has been the weekly blogger for The New York Times InEducation global curriculum platform. Founder, moderator and host of the university’s community based ‘Open VISIONS Forum’ public affairs programs, he has enjoyed stage dialogues with many important 21st Century thinkers.

Connecting art of the past with issues and contexts of today – he guides us to visually explore the masterpieces of ancient, Renaissance, modern and contemporary artworks – all the more enriching as we come to realize why: ‘Art Really Matters!’

 

Host

Michael Zeldin

Michael Zeldin is a well-known and highly-regarded TV and radio analyst/commentator.

He has covered many high-profile matters, including the Clinton impeachment proceedings, the Gore v. Bush court challenges, Special Counsel Robert Muller’s investigation of interference in the 2016 presidential election, and the Trump impeachment proceedings.

In 2019, Michael was a Resident Fellow at the Institute of Politics at the Harvard Kennedy School, where he taught a study group on Independent Investigations of Presidents.

Previously, Michael was a federal prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Justice. He also served as Deputy Independent/ Independent Counsel, investigating allegations of tampering with presidential candidate Bill Clinton’s passport files, and as Deputy Chief Counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives, Foreign Affairs Committee, October Surprise Task Force, investigating the handling of the American hostage situation in Iran.

Michael is a prolific writer and has published Op-ed pieces for CNN.com, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Hill, The Washington Times, and The Washington Post.

Follow Michael on Twitter: @michaelzeldin

Subscribe to the Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/that-said-with-michael-zeldin/id1548483720




The Semi-Political Junkie Problem (With An Important PR Lesson For People in Our Business)

How to Survive Work Crises- What I Learned on Capitol Hill

 

Arthur Solomon

Ever since I can remember I have been interested in two subjects –sports and politics. I have been fortunate to spend a large portion of my working days in those two areas.

In sports, initially as a sports writer for New York City dailies before playing key public relations roles on national and international sports marketing programs, as well as on prestigious flagship none sports programs, which I find much more interesting than detailing the happenings of a baseball or football game.

My political experience included working on local, statewide and national presidential campaigns, sometimes as a publicist, sometimes as an event creator, often wearing both hats at the same time.

Today, I’m more interested in the political and marketing aspects of sports and how it is covered by the media. The days of my allegiance to a team are none existent. It disappeared when I began covering the business as a sports writer many years ago and my long career in the sports marketing business solidified my point of view that the sports industry should be viewed as just another business.

Actually, today I’m more interested in the political scene than the sports carryons. I consider myself a bona fide “political junkie,” who, when discussing politics,   finds himself conversing 99 % of the time  with “semi-political junkies,” which I define as a person who mainly relies on the cable news networks for their information.

A typical “semi-political junkie” is a person who says, “I vote Republican because my father was a Republican, or a Democrat who says, “I’ll never vote for a Republican,” regardless of the issues or candidates.

Much more often than not, the “semi-political junkies” tell me, “I didn’t know that” when discussing the details of legislation in Congress. “Where did you get that information?” And I would tell them to not rely on the cable TV political programs for information because you’ll never get the specific details that are reported in news stories of major daily print pubs like the New York Times and Wall Street Journal.

And that’s why I think that political news on television in general, but primarily the cable news outlets, bear responsibility for the sorry state of the nation’s political divide. Mega major credit for the divide also goes to Donald Trump for his actions prior to, during and after the twice-impeached former liar-in-chief president left the White House.

In addition to providing 24/7 coverage of the twice-impeached former president’s s rallies and tweets in 2015, producers of television programs thought it was just dandy to let Trump call in anytime he wanted because it provided eyeballs for the programs.

In 2016 CBS CEO Leslie Moonves said that the network is getting rich off Donald Trump’s run for the White House. “It may not be good for America, but it’s damn good for CBS. … The money’s rolling in …This is going to be a very good year for us.” “It’s a terrible thing to say, but bring it on, Donald. Go ahead. Keep going.”

And remember how for months the TV reports talked about how Hillary Clinton’s lead over Donald Trump was so large that she was “expanding the map,” without taking into consideration the Electoral College?

I seriously think that the cable news political shows are a prime reason for the dumbing down of the American electorate. The great majority of their reporting is limited to expanded headlines reporting. Comparing it to detailed print versions of the same stories, the cable reporting is like the headlines, followed by the first and second paragraphs of a 1000 word print story without the details. As a result, too many people vote without knowing what they are voting for.

The most recent example are the legislative victories for President Biden. Hardly, if ever, have the cable discussions detailed all the elements in the bills. Instead they reported on the mid-term elections as if it was a horse race with the competing candidates replacing the horses. The reason: It’s my guess that most cable political reporters are so used to only reporting headline news that they don’t bother to learn the details. Charitably, I would add that the time given to discussions of a subject prevents detailed reporting. Nevertheless, whatever the cause, scant reporting is bad reporting.

The basic coverage and limited information about a situation on cable and network broadcasts should be considered nothing but a primer for people interested in getting the entire story. The only way to get the entire story is by reading respected print publications.

But the Democratic Party messaging also is responsible for the GOP gains in the mid-terms. (As I write this at 4 p.m. on November 9, it seems likely that the Republicans will win the House.) Democratic messaging was all over the electoral map, with progressives saying one thing, liberals another and moderate to conservative Democrats emphasizing other issues. Conversely, the Republicans messaging concentrated on less than a handful of topics: Crime, taxes, inflation and the problems at the border, issues that dominate news coverage.

While the GOP rout of the Democrats did not occur, recent polls show how difficult it will be for Democrats to win future House and Senate majorities without a major shift in the party’s priorities and messaging. And the Electoral College might be put of reach for Democrats for many presidential elections, unless the GOP nominates another Donald Trump-like candidate.

If the Democrats hope to win the House and Senate, as well as the presidential election in 2024, the various elements that comprise the Democratic Party must decide on a few topics and campaign on them. But that might be difficult. Because as Will Rogers, the actor and social commentator said close to a century ago, “I belong to no organized party. I am a Democrat.” He might as well have said it today.

The November 2022 mid-term elections are now history. I’d be willing to wager some shekels that many voters cast their ballots without knowing the details of the positions of candidates they voted for.

The moment after the polls of the mid-terms closed the 2024 presidential election campaign commenced. Hopefully voters will tune out the limited political coverage of the network and cable political shows and become more familiar about the issues at stake by reading a respected print publication of their choice.

Voters must realize that the next couple of elections might determine if our democracy will survive as we know it. They and the Democratic strategists have to pay attention to local and statewide elections, as the Republican have been doing for decades.

By winning non-presidential elections over the years Republicans were able to control state legislatures and pass legislation, like limiting the rights to an abortion and restricting voting rights. Democratic talking points must emphasize the importance of local elections instead of just concentrating on U.S. Senate and presidential ones. They also must take in the concerns of rural voters, who over the years have become GOP voters because the Democrats concentrated on big city turnouts.

On October 9, on this website I wrote, “Historically, Democrats have campaigned on numerous bread and butter issues. But in my opinion beginning right now – with less  than a month before the mid-term elections on November 8 – they must change their tactics for the remainder of the days leading up to the mid-terms and campaign on the most important issue facing the country – the continuation of our constitutional democracy.” Of course they didn’t as each pressure group in the Democratic caucus had different messages, while the Republicans, as usual, zeroed in on two or three talking points.

On November 1, The New York Times reported that many Democratic leaders agreed with me that their shot-gun messaging was faulty. A Times article reported, “Leading lawmakers and strategists are openly doubting the party’s kitchen-sink approach, saying Democrats have failed to unite around one central message.”

On November 7, Newsweek published an article by Douglas Schoen, a Democratic pollster, and Robert Green, a Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics principal, titled, “How the Democrats Lost the Middle Class.”

The article said that the middle class used to be a Democratic voting bloc, but no longer. “To remain politically viable in 2024 and future elections, the Democratic Party needs to rededicate itself to core American populist values: addressing immediate concerns vis-à-vis the economy and crime, promoting individual advancement, and helping working middle-class voters get ahead.”

In order to win back the support of middle class voters, Democrats should study and copy the Republican playbook because the one used by them over the past few decades doesn’t work. And if that means alienating a certain segment of voters and their Congressional caucus so be it because it’s better to win than lose on principle.

The Important PR Lesson For People in Our Business

Over the years I’ve observed that many PR practitioners create their programs based on current happenings. That’s a mistake, in my opinion, because chances are that other agency practitioners are doing the same and have already launched their media efforts. In order to catch the attention of journalists, PR practitioners should attempt to craft a program that shows out-of-the box thinking and creative. During my early days in the PR business that was the norm. But since the communications schools for many years have been turning out cookie-cutter graduates, editor pals of mine have told me that only the name of client and the agency differentiates one program from another. If account handlers can’t develop a newsy or creative approach when contacting the media, the minimum they should do is provide detailed information, meaning solid facts and examples in their media approaches. And don’t just provide headline type pitches. They should act as Republican strategists have for many years and search for topics that will interest people and editors instead of following the sorry Democratic lead of doing the same thing election after election.

And An Important Lesson For Everyone

In the near future the media will report on polls regarding voter’s feelings about the 2024 presidential election. Don’t be swayed by them. Don’t take them seriously, even though the media will make a big deal about them. History, both ancient and recent, shows that the poll results often have nothing to do with how things will work out. The polls that forecast a decisive Hillary Clinton victory in the 2016 presidential election were wrong, as were the polls that for months forecast a huge Democratic defeat in this year’s mid-terms.

On November 9, a Wall Street Journal article said, “Overall, national polls in 2020 were the most inaccurate in 40 years, a study by the main association of survey researchers found, and state level polls in 2016 were significantly off their mark.”

This year’s mid-term polling was just as bad.


The Unspoken PR Tenet: Bad News Is Good News for Our Business By Arthur SolomonAbout the Author: Arthur Solomon, a former journalist, was a senior VP/senior counselor at Burson-Marsteller, and was responsible for restructuring, managing and playing key roles in some of the most significant national and international sports and non-sports programs. He also traveled internationally as a media adviser to high-ranking government officials. He now is a frequent contributor to public relations publications, consults on public relations projects and was on the Seoul Peace Prize nominating committee. He has been a key player on Olympic marketing programs and also has worked at high-level positions directly for Olympic organizations. During his political agency days, he worked on local, statewide and presidential campaigns. He can be reached at arthursolomon4pr (at) juno.com




PR Masters Series Podcast, Episode #68 – Helen C. Shelton, Global Chief Diversity Officer at Finn Partners

PR Masters Series PodcastAbout the Podcast

The Stevens Group has been presenting the PR Masters Series Podcast for more than two years now.  This series is part of the ongoing partnership between The Stevens Group and CommPRO to bring to PR, digital/interactive and marketing communications agencies the wisdom of those who have reached the top of the PR profession.  Today’s special guest is Helen C.  Shelton, Global Chief Diversity Officer at Finn Partners.

 

 

Helen C. Shelton on the PR Masters Series PodcastAbout Our Guest

Helen C. Shelton is the Global Chief Diversity Officer at Finn Partners. She created the firm’s award-winning Actions Speak Louder program in service to its 1,300 employees and strategic partners around the world to advance DEI at Finn Partners and for its clients across multiple business sectors. At FINN, Helen leads a 100-person DEI Committee, managing four strategic pillars: Inclusion and Employee Engagement; Volunteerism and Civic Engagement; Recruitment and Higher Education; and Thought Leadership. In addition, Helen is head of multicultural marketing and is responsible for consumer engaging programs for a variety of sectors, with a particular expertise in health, technology and consumer goods. 

Helen is a passionate and dedicated DEI strategist, serving as a trusted point of counsel for corporations and brands facing DEI challenges and crises both internally and externally. She works tirelessly in the industry not only to advance diversity, equity and inclusion in both the corporate and non-profit sectors, but also to advance important causes, ranging from health and education disparities, domestic violence, voter education and access to the arts and culture for underserved communities. , disparate unemployment, health disparities and disease awareness initiatives. 

Named one of the 25 Most Influential Black Women in Business by The Network Journal magazine, Helen is a 2021 inductee into the PR Week Hall of Femme, Trustee of the PRSA Foundation and a Director of the New York Urban League.  She is a member of the social service women’s organization, The Links, and a Charter Member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated. Helen is a graduate of Dartmouth College and holds an M.S. degree from Boston University. She is featured in the seminal book, Diverse Voices and regularly writes about DEI in industry trades, most recently PR News and Triple Pundit.

Helen is a native New Yorker, and in her spare time enjoys Italian cinema, museums, reading and cooking.




Welcome to the Active Listening Channel

 

How good of a listener are you? Do you truly hear and understand what your colleagues, customers, friends or family really want? Frankly, people are just not good listeners. We always get very excited about what we can say or do next that we sometimes forget to be in the moment and listen and learn from what we can hear from others.

In business it can be even worse at times. We are not listening to our management, entire team and our customers. We spend a lot of time planning what we will say in the market and what we tell our customers. It’s no wonder since companies typically do not take the time to train their employees to be open listeners or even critical listeners. To top it all off, remote work is adding to the feeling of just not being heard.

In CommPRO’s new Active Listening channel we hope to share with you new and innovative approaches to training all members of your organization in the art and science of active listening. By combining emotional intelligence and active listening skills companies can benefit by retaining employees, turning employees into listening leaders, increasing trust in the workplace, increasing customer understanding, growing revenue and more.

Adi Y. Segal

Adi Y. Segal, CEO & Hapi

“Research shows that listening is the most important business skill. Inspired by the impact of our Active Listening as a Service (ALaas) app, we are excited to launch the Atlantic Listening Academy to train our team and yours to be better listeners. Being a better listener makes you a stronger professional in any industry, enhances personal relationships, and has a high correlation with reducing loneliness and improves your physical health,” shared Adi Y. Segal, CEO @ Hapi.

People do not have the ability to sit in silence and neither do we. With the support of Hapi, we want to explore topics like:

  • Important leadership skills to bring to your team
  • Integrating listening into your corporate culture
  • Training yourself and others to be good listeners
  • How to find out what your customers actually need and want
  • Learning what your employees are actually feeling and saying  

Learning to listen to your team and your customers will grow your business.




How To Connect With Anyone–Getting Started

How To Connect With Anyone

 

 

Remember how easy it was to make friends as a kid? It was as if you could walk up to anyone and instantaneously become best friends with them.

But for some reason meeting new people and making new friends as an adult seems more challenging than ever. Sometimes, it feels near impossible.

But there are several reasons for this.‍

It’s Hard To Make Friends As An Adult

You are not alone if you’ve lost touch with most of your friends. One study in 2016 suggests that PEOPLE’S CONNECTIONS WITH OTHERS START TO DECLINE AFTER 25 YEARS OF AGE.

As we get older, our priorities and responsibilities evolve, and with the combination of work, finances, family life, to-do lists, and our relationships, it can feel that all these things compete with each other for time and attention.

Unfortunately, our relationships with others can often slip through the cracks over time.

Think about how often you’ve canceled a meeting with a friend because something came up. Life happens, and whether the excuse is legitimate or not, our friendships are the easiest to put on hold. When this habitually happens, the relationship ties become weaker and weaker.

Friendships are investments that take time and effort.

In a study published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, the AVERAGE ADULTS NEED TO INVEST 50 HOURS WITH ANOTHER PERSON TO CONSIDER THEM A CASUAL FRIEND AND ABOUT 200 HOURS FOR THE OTHER PERSON TO BE CONSIDERED A CLOSE FRIEND.

It goes without saying that time should be allocated to develop our relationships with other people. The more meaningful the relationship, the more attention it may need, and with our busy schedules, it can definitely be an obstacle in making time.‍

Having Friendships Is Important

Having good and healthy relationships makes us healthier and happier.

Dr. Robert Waldinger, a Harvard researcher and the fourth director of the longest study on happiness, says, “While many young people tend to think that fame, fortune, and hard work will bring them happiness, it’s actually our social connections that are the most important to our well-being.”

Positive relationships provide emotional support that can help us get through difficult times. They also are an excellent source of encouragement and motivation and boost our sense of self-worth.

These types of friendships positively influence our lives.

But if you struggle to make friends or keep them, know it is not too late.

The best course to start making friends is to start connecting with others.‍

How To Connect With Anyone (For Beginners)

Meeting new people and making new friends can be intimidating. But to support our overall well-being, we should invest time towards creating positive relationships with the right people.

Forcing yourself to start talking to people can be a significant source of anxiety. But meeting and talking to new people doesn’t have to be a big networking event. It can be a simple gesture toward someone that lets them know and feel acknowledged.

We can start small without forcing ourselves to cast out our entire friendship net. After all, we wouldn’t want to discourage or prevent you from going out there.

To start connecting with people, you can start with:

  1. Go to where the people are— Online friendships are great, especially since they got us through the pandemic, but nothing beats having friends you can meet in real life. Being around people provides you with several opportunities to interact and engage. Although you don’t have to initiate a conversation with them unless you are ready to, you’ll be in the right place to start. A great place can be a coffee shop, a Meetup, a farmers market, etc.
  2. Say “Hello”— It’s not uncommon to be in a crowd of people engaging with their smartphones rather than with each other. When someone passes by you, try saying “hello!” or send them a “hello” smile. A simple hello is enough to make the other person feel acknowledged, which is important to form a connection.
  3. Smile— Nothing is more uninviting than seeing someone, not in a good mood. A sincere smile is not only inviting, but it lets the other person know that you are friendly and approachable.
  4. Give out compliments— Compliments can be fleeting, but they are compelling. Compliments are powerful because they tell the other person you noticed them or at least something about them. They also make people feel good.

‍A Friendly Disclaimer

Along the way, you may come across people who won’t reciprocate your friendly gestures, and that’s okay.

Don’t give up!

Making new friends is not impossible.

With just a little courage and resilience, you could be on your way to connecting with others, making new friends, and developing yourself and relationships.




How You Can Become a Better Listener

How to be a better listener

 

 

Have you ever spoken to someone who dismissed everything you said?

With all the distractions around us, sometimes the people we talk to may not be listening to us at the moment. Maybe they are trying to multitask. But no matter the reason, being ignored can leave us feeling rejected and unimportant.

When we don’t listen to others, we can indirectly hurt that person by making them feel like they don’t matter.

We all know how important communication is in our professional and personal lives, and most of us can see the difference between good and bad communication. When there is an open line of communication (good communication), things seem to click and fall into place. On the other hand, when communication is lacking, things don’t go as smoothly, and sometimes things go wrong. When communication is fractured, people become defensive, misunderstood, and often things fall apart.

Misunderstandings often lead to conflicts, and misunderstandings occur when people fail to listen and understand each other.

Unfortunately, people don’t listen as much as they talk, and the value of listening can reap many benefits when used to communicate with others‍

The Importance of Listening & Why We Should Do It

When people talk about communication skills, they rarely talk about how to become better listeners. Instead, they may teach you how to speak with confidence so that people will listen or how to debate so that you can win any argument.

Most people communicate to get their point across and win. After all, there is no better feeling than being right because we love not being wrong.

But communication is more than winning arguments, closing deals, and giving unsolicited advice. Communication is also about listening to others and making them feel understood.

Unfortunately, we don’t listen enough, mainly because it is not easy.

Listening is much more challenging than most people think, and it is more than just allowing a person to speak. It is about trying to understand them.

We all know it’s essential to be a good listener. Why? Because we all know how good it feels when someone gets us.

LISTENING CREATES AN ENVIRONMENT WHERE THE OTHER PERSON FEELS HEARD. WHAT MAKES LISTENING POWERFUL IS THAT LISTENING CAN HELP IMPROVE YOUR RELATIONSHIP AND GAIN PEOPLE’S TRUST, HAVE HIGHER QUALITY CONVERSATIONS, AND AVOID CONFLICTS AND MISUNDERSTANDINGS.

‍How To Become A Better Listener

Becoming a good listener is not easy, but everyone can be better by practicing:

  1. Fight Distractions— Have you ever zoned out while someone was talking to you? Of course! We all have. On a daily basis, we fight all sorts of distractions from our phones, personal responsibilities, work, and more. Being attentive and actively listening to someone is much more complicated than you think. When someone talks to you, being a good listener means giving that person your full attention so that they feel heard and that you understand them. After all, we all want to feel understood.
  2. Listen to Learn— We all have our perspectives, and our views may differ from one person to another. Be curious about the person and what they have to say. If you listen with curiosity, you might even learn something you didn’t know before.
  3. Listen to Understand— Stephen Covey once said, “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” In other words, people often think about what they want to say without fully listening to what the other person is saying. When someone is speaking, avoid trying to come up with a response and listen to them. By listening to understand, you practice being empathetic. Through empathetic listening, you open the doors to gaining a deeper understanding of the talker.
  4. Be Respectful— It’s normal to disagree with someone, but being a good listener means inviting their point of view without having the urge to get your point of view across. It respects the person’s opinion even though it may differ from yours. Don’t judge; let them finish their thoughts without worrying that you will jump to conclusions.
  5. Avoid Interrupting— We tend to interrupt someone for various reasons, such as wanting to insert an opinion or maybe we are excited about what they are saying. Interrupting less not only improves the flow of the conversation, but it ensures that the other person feels heard and respected. Avoid talking over and cutting them off, as it can offend them.

‍IN CONCLUSION

Listening is a powerful communication skill that allows you to connect with others.

When we don’t listen, we fail to understand each other, and when we fail to understand each other, it can often lead to conflict and misunderstandings.

We can all practice being better listeners by creating a safe space for the other person to speak their mind. When we establish this space for them, not only will they feel respected and heard, but they will most likely do the same for you.

YOU will feel better as a stronger listener.