Who Do You Trust?

LeslieGrossmanLeadership2By Leslie Grossman, Chair, Vistage International

We are stuck in the middle of no man or woman’s land with about two months before one of the most important elections of this century. The biggest question every American should be asking themself is “who do you trust?” or “who do you trust more?”

Who Do You Trust?The truth is that we are faced with asking the question, “who do you trust? ” on a daily basis. We ask it at work. We ask it in our community. We ask it about members of our family.  At work do you trust your employees when they tell you why something didn’t get finished? Do you trust your new boss when they say you’ll be happy in the new position you didn’t want? Do you trust peers, vendors, consultants, your team, your Congressperson, friends, family and the many people that make promises and commitments? What’s your personal experience? How often are you disappointed? How often do people actually come through? Sometimes people tell us that we shouldn’t trust someone. Should we believe them?

How do YOU decide who you should trust? Here’s five suggestions.

  1. Don’t trust everyone you meet. Trust takes time.
  2. What’s the person’s track record? How have they treated people in the past?  What are their motives? Is it money or ego? Do they have a proven track record of delivering to the organization they serve? If they have delivered results and have done what they said they would do in the past, there’s a good chance they will deliver positive results in the future.
  3. Don’t bank on hearsay. If others bad-mouth a person you trust, consider that the criticism could be due to jealousy, fear or competitiveness.
  4. Are their values consistent with your values? What’s important to you? Values like: caring. growth. compassion. professionalism. treating people with respect. honesty. humble confidence. team-oriented. striving for improvement. consistency. Trust comes with shared values.
  5. Are you obsessed with perfectionism? When we demand perfection, we trust no one. No one is perfect, including you and me. Leaders must sometimes take risks and with risks come a few failures.

At work with our bosses, colleagues, and direct reports; in life with our husbands, wives, friends, and family; and in politics with candidates running for office, we are constantly faced with deciding who to trust.

Trust is precious. Trust can be lost. Trust can be reborn. At work and home: question, listen and talk. Give trust a chance. In politics: read, listen, question and talk. Give trust a chance.  Don’t abandon the right our forefathers fought to give each of us. Trust yourself to make the right decision. Vote for the person whom you trust most with your future and the future of those you love.

About the Author:  Leslie Grossman, author of “LINK OUT: How to Turn Your Network into a Chain of Lasting Connections” (Wiley), is a Vistage International Chair in New York City.  She was CEO of Communications/Marketing Action and Women’s Leadership Exchange and is a leadership and business development strategist, speaker and coach at Leslie Grossman Leadership.   Leslie can be reached at leslie@lesliegrossmanleadership.com




Moving Beyond the #WomanCard

jenputnamBy Jen Putnam, Chief Creative Officer, Allen & Gerritsen

As a female chief creative officer, I’m used to being in the minority. It’s a sad but true fact that a miniscule number of the people who hold my title are female, despite the fact that advertising is a $33 billion industry – not to mention that women control upwards of 80% of consumer purchasing and $20 trillion of the world’s annual consumer spending. We’re making strides for sure, thanks in large part to the 3% Conference, which was created to develop, foster and champion female creative talent and leadership. But we have a long way to go, and that very fact infuriates me.

Speaking of infuriating, the recent buzz around Trump’s statements that Hillary Clinton has succeeded solely because of her gender conjured a powerful memory for me. About a year ago, at my previous company, I had a male “colleague” suggest to me that the “woman card” must have served me well on my career path. I could barely believe what I was hearing. Even after years of obstacles, sexism and biases, this comment was among the most offensive I had ever heard. And in that moment, after my initial shock and horror subsided, I told him that what served me well was my perseverance, sincerity, loyalty, commitment, passion and talent. That I’m not merely filling a quota. That I worked my ass off to get where I am today, and for him to suggest anything otherwise was just wrong.

Needless to say, the conversation ended there.

While I’m proud to have a voice in this discussion, I wish it wasn’t something we even needed to talk about. Talent knows no gender, race, age, sexuality, or any other number of so-called “defining” factors. I’m fortunate enough to work at a company that sees its employees as people, not statistics, and values each and every team member’s individuality and perspective. But not everyone is so lucky, and that means those of us who are in a position to help enact change must seize every opportunity to do so.

Case in point: at Allen & Gerritsen, we created a program called Boss Ladies to foster and cultivate an environment where women know they can be successful. By participating in the initiative, women at A&G have opportunities to step into leadership roles by organizing focused discussions around personal development in the form of panel discussions with industry experts, workshops and skill building exercises.

We strive to generate awareness about some very real unconscious behaviors we all exhibit and provide the entire agency with strategies and opportunities to overcome those behaviors. And our conversations aren’t limited to women. After all, if we’re discussing these critical issues in a vacuum we can only make so much progress. So our supportive manbassadors join us as we share ideas about industry opportunities for diversity, including what ruffles feathers and what can be done to make positive changes.

It’s been incredible to see my colleagues embrace this initiative wholeheartedly. But my aspiration for Boss Ladies is for it to become obsolete. I genuinely hope I live to see the day when we no longer have to go the extra mile to provide opportunities for women because they simply exist. Women represent 50% of the population, and the same should be true of leadership roles in our industry.

Closing this gap is not an option. It’s a necessity.

About the Author: Jennifer Putnam is chief creative officer at Allen & Gerritsen, a full-service marketing agency based in Boston and Philadelphia. 




New York Media Festival Returns to Manhattan With 20+ Events and 200+ Speakers, September 26-29

nyme200A Commpro News Update

Monday, September 26, through Thursday, September 29, 2016 The New York Media Festival, a four-day event for the digital, games, music, television and video industries, will take place at the Museum of Jewish Heritage. The Festival provides an environment for deal-making, partnership building and networking for executives, brands, investors, content creators and technology startups.

Microsoft, Shutterstock, #techdrinkup, B/Hi Communications, VRTIFY, Amper Music, Katalyst Live and IRIS.TV, (among others) will be hosting Daily Tech-Media Crawl open houses and networking parties city wide.

“NY Media Festival is designed to connect innovators and influencers across the media and entertainment industries,” said Ned Sherman, New York Media Festival Chair and CEO of Digital Media Wire. “This year’s event is more innovative than ever showcasing developments in VR/AR and technology that are shaping the future of consumer entertainment experiences.”

The Festival hosts more than 200 top speakers who highlight innovations, trends and best practices in their respective industries.

Speakers include:

  • Kathy Baker, SVP, Digital Marketing, Columbia Records/Sony Music Entertainment
  • Jonathan Azu, EVP & GM, Red Light Management
  • Alexander Kisch, EVP, Business Development & Business Affairs, Vevo
  • Mikko Setälä, Chief Corporate Development Officer, Rovio Entertainment
  • Ken Wakeford, COO, Kabam
  • John Militello, Director of Marketing, Volvo Cars USA
  • Christina Alejandre, General Manager & Vice President, eSports, ELEAGUE
  • Sam Olstein, Global Innovation Director, GE
  • Aaron Luber, Head of Content Partnerships, Google
  • Christopher Byrd, Lead Video Game Critic, The Washington Post
  • Harold Goldberg, Founder & Editor in Chief, New York Videogame Critics Circle
  • Ira Rubenstein, Senior Vice President & General Manager, Digital & Marketing, PBS
  • Christy Tanner, Senior Vice President & General Manager, CBS News Digital
  • Bob Gruters, US Group Lead, Entertainment, Restaurants, and Multicultural, Facebook
  • Eric Berger, EVP, Digital Networks, Sony Pictures Television & General Manager, Crackle
  • Jeff Marsilio, Vice President, Global Media, NBA
  • Martha Nelson, Global Editor-in-Chief, Yahoo
  • Stephanie Mehta, Deputy Editor, Vanity Fair
  • Tony Emerson, Managing Director, Worldwide Media & Cable, Microsoft
  • Stephen Bryan, Chief Content Officer, SoundCloud

The Festival will open with a party at Hudson Terrace on Monday night, followed by a Digital Music Forum on Tuesday, featuring artists, managers, digital services and record label execs. On Wednesday, the Conference will focus on Games, including sessions and influencers from the games industry like publishers, developers and advertising firms. The last day of the festival will focus on the Future of Television Summit, a conference for broadcasters, content creators, advertisers and digital studios.

Every day, the Innovation Summit will also be featured.  This will serve as the official innovation track and startup summit of the Festival, presenting lightning talks, panels, breakout sessions and a vendor showcase in a 5,000 square foot space above the main stage events.

Support for the 2016 New York Media Festival is provided by AMD, Microsoft, Optimizely, OwnZones, SoundExchange, TiVo, Manatt, IRIS.TV, PluraVida, Monegraph, SESAC, Amper Music, Katalyst Live, Fox Rothschild, B/HI, VRTIFY, LyricFind, Plex, Dropbox, WattPad, Affectiva, Music Reports, Shutterstock, Fusicology, Parks Associates, Events for Gamers, NewFilmmakers, NY Women in Film & TV, IGDA, Manhattan Chamber of Commerce, Branded Ltd., IAEL, SAG-AFTRA, Canadian Music Week, Variety, NATPE, Digiday, and National Academy for Television Arts and Science NY.

About NYME

The New York Media Festival (NYME) is an event designed to bring together experienced influencers and leaders to learn more about their respective fields and to network across New York City. The 4-day event includes opening and closing parties, industry leadership dinners, conferences, summits and open houses for the gaming, video and music industries. NYME’s founding team includes seasoned conference and event producers Ned and Tinzar Sherman. Over the past 15 years, the team has produced more than 200 events including some of the biggest and most impactful entertainment, tech and digital industry conferences, concerts, launch parties, intimate VIP dinners and networking events. Visit www.mefest.com for more information. www.mefest.com




Take a Woman to Work Today: Yourself

Valerie GravesBy Valerie Graves, Creative Advertising Guru and Author, “Pressure Makes Diamonds: Becoming The Woman I Pretended To Be” 

As I sat down to write a few words about gender in the marketing/advertising/communications industry, I was struck by the stark differences between the two most visible communicators of the moment, the presidential nominees of the two major parties. Whatever one’s preference, it is hard to deny that Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are stylistically diametric opposites. Large in personality as well as stature, loud, uber-confident, impetuous and imperious, Donald Trump is a sharp contrast to the smaller, calmer, thoughtfully prepared, steely but collaborative Hillary Clinton. Clinton’s campaign theme, “Stronger Together” reflects her very different way of thinking about leadership.

What is interesting, though not surprising, is how seldom their differences are discussed in terms of gender.

While one can argue that it would be of no particular benefit to bring up the subject, when has that ever stopped the press from probing? Even a surface examination would reveal that if stereotypes are at all based on reality, Donald Trump is running like a typical man and Hillary Clinton is handling her bid pretty much the way women do. So why is no one talking about it? My theory is that everyone –including the press- fears that to say Hillary Clinton is campaigning like a woman would be considered a negative attack, implying weakness, softness and a general lack of “the right stuff” to handle a job that, based on the evidence, seems to require a healthy dose of testosterone as a qualifying factor. To remark, on the other hand, that Donald Trump is running like a man would imply good and admirable things. Take this sharp contrast out of the world of high stakes politics, and you will be left with a situation that is played out daily in the nation’s executive suites.

Less well-known women are getting things done in the same less bombastic, more thoughtful and inclusive way as Clinton, without getting or taking credit for handling the task “like a real woman.” Maggie Wilderotter, former CEO of Frontier Communications, was quoted by CNN as saying women are “very good at multitasking, have a sixth sense with people, are nurturing and service-oriented.” In more than one circumstance, I have witnessed situations where male executives, entrusted with powerful leadership positions, owed much of their success to female subordinates who, far from merely implementing the ideas of their bosses, were actually major contributors to the ideas themselves. Those women generally received credit only for being “good at their jobs,” rather than being innovative, effective leaders and team builders. According to CNN Money, although only 4.4% of CEO jobs in Fortune 500 Companies are held by women, females hold 16.5% of the four executive positions just below CEO in the S&P 500– chief financial officers, chief operating officers and other key roles at major companies. Although still a dismal number considering that women comprise more than half the population, it seems proportionally significant.

It is time to recognize and legitimize the value of womanliness in the workplace. That way, a new generation of females can be cognizant of the value of high emotional intelligence, collaborative, communicative inclinations and even –dare I say it- a bit of maternal instinct. As a Creative Director and ultimately a Chief Creative Officer of two advertising agencies working for Fortune 500 clients, I found great use for the skill set common to wives and mothers, who cannot simply fire their mates and children. Understanding, on an individual level, what motivates people and nurturing the best out of them is a necessity of competent mothering, yet few children doubt that Mom is in charge. Respectful collaboration and partnership, as opposed to subordination, are often the hallmarks of successful marriage. Affirming and consciously incorporating a woman’s proclivities can be expected to yield great dividends. Companies with a high representation of women board members, for example, significantly outperformed those with no female directors, according to a 2011 analysis of financial results at Fortune 500 companies by nonprofit research organization Catalyst.

Most of all, it will be beneficial for women themselves to realize that what makes us women is also part and parcel of what makes us successful. In my book, “Pressure Makes Diamonds: Becoming the Woman I Pretended to Be,” I detail the career breakthrough that occurred when I realized that life as an African American had given me an empathy and insight that translated to expertise in communicating with black audiences and being a manager and executive in multicultural environments. In an era that places great stock in authenticity, I look forward to the rising realization that we females do not succeed in spite of being women, but because of it. Our “womanly” characteristics can be the counterbalancing energy to the “masculine” tendencies that too narrowly define our concept of leadership. For too long, recognition for women has been too dependent on our ability to behave and perform like men. Moving forward, we should seize the opportunity to bring our whole, authentic selves to the job. Today, take a woman to work and turn her loose.

About the Author: Author and creative guru Valerie Graves, whom Advertising Age magazine named one of the “100 Best and Brightest” in the entire industry, is a nationally recognized creative director of such Fortune 500 accounts as Ford, General Motors, AT&T, Burger King, General Foods, and Pepsi. A former teenage parent from the factory town of Pontiac, Michigan, Graves broke barriers in advertising as one of the first black copywriters at BBDO, Kenyon & Eckhardt, and JWT. She went on to an award-winning career as chief creative officer at the UniWorld and Vigilante/Leo Burnett agencies, senior vice president of creative services at iconic Motown Records, and creative consultant to President Bill Clinton. In 2007, recognizing Graves’s stellar career and public service via the Advertising Council and the Partnership for a Drug-Free America, industry coalition ADCOLOR granted her the title of “Legend.” She resides in New York City. 




Virtual Summer Vacation Enhances Workplace Productivity

Linda Passante 200By Linda Passante, CEO, The Halo Group

In addition to a CEO’s everyday tasks of leading, planning and organizing comes a responsibility that is often overlooked: motivating. Within organizational development, motivation and productivity go hand in hand.  Motivation sparks the desire to produce while the obligation to produce creates a need for motivation.

Productivity in the workplace is often a challenge as employees constantly encounter distractions and deterrents from various sources.  Feeling appreciated, having fun and taking regular breaks are all crucial elements that impact the level of productivity (and overall happiness) within the office.  A recent report by Globoforce found that 39% of employees feel underappreciated at work, with 77% reporting that they would work harder if they felt better recognized.

The summer months prove to be an additional challenge to workplace productivity.  Productivity throughout the long summer months drastically drops 20% due to an increase in daydreaming and socializing and a decrease in actually staying in the office.

At The Halo Group, a branding and marketing communications agency located in the heart of Manhattan, we understand the importance of motiving employees.  We also understand the importance of staying on top of the latest social, cultural and industry trends.  That’s why we took some creative liberty to fuse them together.

With virtual reality as the breakout star in the world of tech, gaming, marketing and beyond, The Halo Group wanted to use this budding technology to show employees that they are appreciated while also increasing productivity during the summertime.  To make this idea come to life, The Halo Group offered its employees a virtual summer vacation through the magic of virtual reality.  Using Google Cardboard, a virtual reality app called Relaxation VR, beach balls, towels and fans, we created an in-office beach experience where each employee was able to put on the Google Cardboard and ‘escape’ to their ultimate beach getaway.

This virtual escape proved that a little bit of play and creativity goes a long way. Employees seemed happier, more relaxed and ready to get back to work.  As an added bonus, employees were educated on the possibilities that virtual reality brings to the advertising and marketing industry.  This virtual vacation gave them a preview of the technology we are guaranteed to use within the next few years.

While this specific project took place during the summer, motivation through play should be incorporated into the workplace throughout the year.  Spending just 15-20 minutes playing during the workday can inspire innovation, enhance productivity and reduce anxiety.  Recent studies show that employees who are motivated through play not only work harder, but maintain greater loyalties towards their companies for longer periods of time.

The challenge of inspiring employees is ubiquitous, but it is our responsibility to understand individuals’ needs in order to provide the appropriate motivation.  Workers who feel appreciated and are motivated at work will ultimately be excited about their jobs, carry out their responsibilities to the best of their ability and make contributions to their place of work.

 About the Author: For over 25 years, Linda has worked hand in hand with regional, national, and international C-Level Executives to create, re-position, and grow their brands. She has persistently generated growth and increased the bottom line of brands across all categories in most every market, literally making billions of dollars for her clients. Based on her history of winning loyal customers, Linda has shaped Halo into a top-tier New York agency. Working alongside a formidable executive team with global brand experience and a deep understanding of the interconnection of communications, Linda has established a strong reputation as an agency leader on the forefront of communications. In 2004, Linda completed the Harvard School of Business Executive Leadership Program and recently the NYU Executive Finance and Accounting Program. She has been recognized by Wall Street Journal’s Women of Note, SmartCEO, and Stevie Best International Entrepreneurs. Linda serves on the AMIN Network Global Committee, Womensphere Advisory Council, and is a member of the Women President’s Organization.  

 




The “YouEconomy” According To Success Magazine: Take Control Of Your Time, Your Happiness & Your Money

The Mr. Magazine™Interview With Jim McCabe, General Manager & Josh Ellis, Editor In Chief, Success Magazine

Success Magazine“This is more of a general statement of how we look at print as part of our brand. We’re very, very happy to be in the magazine business and we look at the print product as a powerful opportunity for us to be able to put out issues like the “YouEconomy” issue with careful study of interesting issues that are effecting our readers lives in a way that only print can do it. And that is in a format that is long-form, and that people can spend time with and can share with others and that’s durable.” Jim McCabe

“You mention all of the different avenues that we have to put the good news about this out and express it to as many people as we can, but yes, the print magazine was the lead edge. That’s where we really wanted to plant the flag was with that identifiable cover that we have on the August issue.” (On the role of print versus all of the other platforms Success has) Josh Ellis

“That’s why for us as a magazine and a media brand that is targeted to people and that really wants to be partners with people as they journey to success; that’s why the print product is so important for us. It’s the place where we can have the longer form discussion; it’s durable and we have all of the avenues where people can continue that discussion socially and online and we give them day-to-day inspiration with those vehicles, but nothing can replace print as the durable place for a long-form discussion.” Jim McCabe

 “The cover story alone is 6,000 words, and that’s just something that you don’t see online very much. People will not sit down for the hour that it takes to read a story that long and from the same website and keep scrolling and scrolling, but in print it’s an enjoyable read, because of things like layout and the feel of the paper. We thought it was so important for our readers to get the entire sense of what has developed in the “YouEconomy” that print is the perfect place to really make the announcement.” Josh Ellis

Jim McCabe

Jim McCabe

Take action and work for yourself in the “YouEconomy.” The upcoming August issue of Success magazine is sounding the trumpet and ushering in the concept/movement that could change people’s professional lives with a positive and affirming message that according to General Manager, Jim McCabe, is both naturally evolved and organically grown. Through the thought process that there are no limits or boundaries except the ones we set for ourselves, the “YouEconomy” and Success magazine will show us how we can free ourselves from all types of restrictive mindsets.

I spoke with Jim and editor in chief, Josh Ellis, recently and we talked about this incredibly liberating concept that a person can live and work basically anyway they choose when they decide to follow their passions and become engaged with their own agenda, instead of an employer’s. It’s a fascinating subject matter and definitely worth an expanded special issue of Success, which is what readers will get with the August issue. The magazine is devoting each and every feature, including the 6,000 word cover story, to the “YouEconomy” in some form or fashion. A must read for those ready to take control of their own professional destiny.

 

Josh Ellis

Josh Ellis

As Josh and Jim each brought their own passions and ideas to the table, the discussion was lively and informative with a hint of “You can do this too” behind every word. Of course, Mr. Magazine™ already subscribes to the “YouEconomy” with every new magazine that hits newsstands, as his passion would allow for nothing less. And the August issue of Success offers each of its readers the same opportunity to explore their own unique passions.

So, without further ado, I hope that you enjoy the Mr. Magazine™interview with Jim McCabe, General Manager & Josh Ellis, Editor In Chief, Success Magazine.

But first the sound-bites:

On how the magazine’s team is being used to create the “YouEconomy” movement (Jim McCabe): It’s not necessarily that we’re creating a movement; it’s the sense that I think we’ve tapped into something that has naturally evolved, and that’s this sense that people are looking at their lives in a different way for a lot of different reasons.

On whether success today is easier or harder than ever (Jim McCabe): What we preach is that there is no universal definition of success. To each individual, success means something different. To some success is very traditional, it means what they can acquire: how big a house they have, how many cars they own, how they travel the world. To others success could mean something very different. Success could mean throwing themselves into charity work to be able to try and find a cure for a disease that’s affected a loved one.

On how the “YouEconomy” concept is captured within the pages of the magazine (Josh Ellis): It’s completely representative of what we’ve tried to make the magazine about for as long as I’ve been here. Some people sort of confuse it with something like Money or Fortune, but it hasn’t been that. It’s been a holistic definition of success.

On whether the “YouEconomy” humanizes success (Josh Ellis): I think so. As Jim touched on, there were a lot of old definitions and I think it can even go back as far as the Industrial Age. We had this old timey view of what success looked like, but really it’s an individual thing. And so much of what we do and why we settled on the “YouEconomy” name in fact was to make it individual for each person, because each person’s definition of success in this 21st century economic paradigm is really up to them.

On how you know when you’ve achieved success (Jim McCabe):That’s a very individual thing. But one thing that we talked a lot about in the magazine as one of the measurements is plain happiness. Are you satisfied with what you’re doing? Do you feel as though the work that you’re putting in is fairly compensated? And are you doing not only the things that you want to do professionally, but are you able to do the things that you want to do personally and developing as an individual to a place that you want to be?

On whether the “YouEconomy” formula is the same for everyone when it comes to achieving success and happiness (Jim McCabe): What I think is fascinating about the “You Economy” is that it’s cross generational. There are people in their 50s now who started their careers and were 100% sure they were going to be in corporate America for the rest of their lives and their biggest fear in life was always losing a job and not having an opportunity to earn income and then where that next job was coming from and what they were going to do. And then you also have the younger people, the millennials, who have just come out and have always looked at life differently and aren’t necessarily enamored with signing up with a company forever and having a boss tell them what to do. But the one universal thing that they all have now is immediate opportunity. The one thing that I think the “YouEconomy” eliminates is the unknown.

On whether the “YouEconomy” formula is the same for everyone when it comes to achieving success and happiness (Josh Ellis): With our research; we did a Harris Poll, with more than 2,000 adults, and we found that a third of Americans in the workforce have made money in this way within the last year and millennials are the biggest part of it. And so to your question about whether this is an avenue for just about everybody, I think that our research does support that.

On the role the print magazine plays in the “YouEconomy” concept versus all of the other platforms Success has (Josh Ellis): You mention all of the different avenues that we have to put the good news about this out and express it to as many people as we can, but yes, the print magazine was the lead edge. That’s where we really wanted to plant the flag was with that identifiable cover that we have on the August issue.

On how important it is to spread the message that print is still viable in this digital age (Jim McCabe): This is more of a general statement of how we look at print as part of our brand. We’re very, very happy to be in the magazine business and we look at the print product as a powerful opportunity for us to be able to put out issues like the “YouEconomy” issue with careful study of interesting issues that are effecting our readers lives in a way that only print can do it. And that is in a format that is long-form, and that people can spend time with and can share with others and that’s durable.

On how important it is to spread the message that print is still viable in this digital age (Josh Ellis): The other thing too is this was such an important tent-pole for our brand as a whole and in really helping our readers to understand what we’re about and to sort of define, whether they knew it or not, who our readers are. And the cover story alone is 6,000 words, and that’s just something that you don’t see online very much. People will not sit down for the hour that it takes to read a story that long and from the same website and keep scrolling and scrolling, but in print it’s an enjoyable read, because of things like layout and the feel of the paper.

On anything else they’d like to add (Jim McCabe): Just that we’re very, very proud of it and I’m extremely proud of it because this is the reflection of Josh’s leadership, taking over the magazine and producing such a quality product so quickly. And taking on a subject that I think is really interesting and newsworthy and groundbreaking. And it’s a reflection of how great a staff he put together for us to be able to do this.

On anything else they’d like to add (Josh Ellis): I think that a lot of times a national magazine that isn’t in the New York sphere can be easy to overlook, but doing big issues and really getting out there and trying to produce something that will make a statement is an important way to create some brand awareness. And so this was really a huge issue for the magazine and for everything that we do at Success.

On what someone would find them doing if they showed up unexpectedly one evening to their home (Jim McCabe): I’m usually catching up on the day’s news one way or the other, either scanning CNN or Bloomberg or something, or catching up with the Journal or The New York Times or the Post or some of the things that I have to read every day, but haven’t gotten to, and possibly exercising and trying to squeeze that in as well.

On what someone would find them doing if they showed up unexpectedly one evening to their home (Josh Ellis): I love to cook; I try to do that as much as I can. But I am a subscriber to several magazines, so I will take some time and read through a few long-form pieces a week. Other than that, playing with the dog or playing video games. (Laughs)

On what keeps them up at night (Jim McCabe): These days? The state of politics in the U.S. (Laughs) That really does worry me, because I just think that we’re in a place now where we’ve pushed out a good group of people, a moderate group of people and we’re constantly debating on the fringes as opposed to trying to understand all of the amazing blessings and things we have here.

On what keeps them up at night (Josh Ellis): I’m easily fixated on some kind of content that I’m enjoying, so whether I’m reading a magazine story or a book or watching something on Netflix, I have contrary to what a lot of people assume about my generation, a pretty good attention span, so I’m willing to invest some time in entertainment or to learn something new, or to just think about one thing for a long time.

And now the lightly edited transcript of the Mr. Magazine™ interview with Jim McCabe, General Manager & Josh Ellis, Editor in Chief, Success magazine.

Success on the YouEconomySamir Husni: I was reading about the “YouEconomy” movement in an article in the August issue of Success and it said that it’s much more than money, it’s opportunity for growth, innovation, creating a legacy; it’s about your skills, ideas, your smile. Tell me how you’re taking the magazine and creating the “YouEconomy” movement with the Success team?

Jim McCabe: It’s not necessarily that we’re creating a movement; it’s the sense that I think we’ve tapped into something that has naturally evolved, and that’s this sense that people are looking at their lives in a different way for a lot of different reasons.

Thirty years ago the way that people looked at their career was very, very different, it was predictable; you knew what courses to study in college if you were going into a certain discipline, you would attach yourself to a company that had a particular path that would allow you to see your future there for decades and the compensation was arranged to give you pensions and other things that made it very comfortable and worthwhile to invest your time there.

When the world began to shift and we could go into hundreds of reasons why that was, but that covenant between the worker and the business began to erode and it became much more of a transactional relationship, people began to look at what they were doing for the majority of their lives and instead of just looking at compensation from the financial standpoint, they looked at compensation from a number of different standpoints. They looked at the emotional standpoint, the legacy standpoint, and from a simple happiness standpoint.

And these are all things that we’ve preached in the magazine, so naturally what happened was people began to identify with what we were talking about and we began to see this group of people who were growing become much more interested in the things that we were doing. And that’s part of the reason I think you saw our website over the past couple of years go from 300,000 monthly uniques to close to two million. That’s why we have the three million Facebook likes that we have.

It’s been a natural marriage of what we have always consistently said. And the circumstances of where people are in their lives have matched that and that’s how we’ve come together.

Samir Husni: Do you think achieving success today is easier or harder than ever?

Jim McCabe: What we preach is that there is no universal definition of success. To each individual, success means something different. To some success is very traditional, it means what they can acquire: how big a house they have, how many cars they own, how they travel the world.

To others success could mean something very different. Success could mean throwing themselves into charity work to be able to try and find a cure for a disease that’s affected a loved one. Success for some people could mean that they just want to surf all day and they need to have the right amount of income to be able to support that, so finding something that they can do in the off-surfing hours to support that lifestyle is important.

I think the major difference that we’re in now and one of the major points about the “You Economy” is that there are many accepted definitions of success. In the past, again thirty years ago, there was a pretty universal definition of how people measured each other when it came to success, the size of their home, the type of car they drove. Now, people look at individuals and are very open to saying, OK, they’re living the life that they want to live and I’m fine with that. I’m not going to judge them. They’re successful by their own definition and that’s great.

Samir Husni: Josh, how do you take the “YouEconomy” and try and capture it in the pages of the magazine, because you now have to deal with work, play and life?

Josh Ellis: It’s completely representative of what we’ve tried to make the magazine about for as long as I’ve been here. Some people sort of confuse it with something like Money or Fortune, but it hasn’t been that. It’s been a holistic definition of success.

We redesigned the front of the book to try and encompass as many of the major pillars of how our readers define success and it’s happiness, health, growth and purpose. And I think for a lot of people, especially younger people, millennial readers, the growth and the purpose aspect of success and the “YouEconomy” as an avenue toward that is just a natural fit. We think that younger readers especially, they recognize that there is a certain amount of money that will allow them to live comfortably and to pursue the passions that they want.

Jim talked about people who want to surf all day; some people, especially my age, we don’t want to come into an office. We want to work from home or only work 15 hours per week and still be able to make a living doing that and the “YouEconomy” represents a way that that’s possible. It also makes it possible to be able to make a living doing things that we’re passionate about, whether it’s contract labor, something that we have great skills in, or even something as simple as Uber driving. There are so many avenues to entrepreneurship now that the “You Economy” makes perfect sense for us.

Samir Husni: With the “YouEconomy,” are you humanizing success?

Josh Ellis: I think so. As Jim touched on, there were a lot of old definitions and I think it can even go back as far as the Industrial Age. We had this old timey view of what success looked like, but really it’s an individual thing.

And so much of what we do and why we settled on the “YouEconomy” name in fact was to make it individual for each person, because each person’s definition of success in this 21st century economic paradigm is really up to them. It’s how they want to achieve it, the things that they can do, and this is in a lot of ways where we come in. It’s the things that they can do to supplement their skills and to make themselves more productive or more persuasive, or so many different soft skills that we can teach that are helpful not only in traditional careers, but also in careers as our readers define them for themselves.

Samir Husni: Jim, as an achiever, how do you know or when do you feel that you’ve achieved that success with the “YouEconomy?” Do you have a measurement or some sort of guideline that let’s someone know they did it, they achieved success?

Jim McCabe: That’s a very individual thing. But one thing that we talked a lot about in the magazine as one of the measurements is plain happiness. Are you satisfied with what you’re doing? Do you feel as though the work that you’re putting in is fairly compensated? And are you doing not only the things that you want to do professionally, but are you able to do the things that you want to do personally and developing as an individual to a place that you want to be?

So, that’s a very individual and emotional thing, but I think anybody who has worked in a traditional career has had times when they felt like they were stuck in a job or that they weren’t being recognized or were worried about whether or not they were getting that promotion.

And I think taking those equations out and allowing yourself to say that you’re going to be responsible for your own paycheck and everything else that happens gives people a sense of freedom and happiness that if they’re able to meet those goals, which we’re saying in the “You Economy” that there’s so many different options for someone to be able to do that and there are combinations of options out there that allow you to do that, the happiness equation is something that people get.

Samir Husni: From what I understand, happiness today is more of a science than an emotion. With that happiness as the anchor for success, do you think that people from all walks of life can achieve the same results from the “YouEconomy” concept, achieve the same level of happiness? Is the “YouEconomy” formula for everyone?

Jim McCabe: What I think is fascinating about the “YouEconomy” is that it’s cross generational. There are people in their 50s now who started their careers and were 100% sure they were going to be in corporate America for the rest of their lives and their biggest fear in life was always losing a job and not having an opportunity to earn income and then where that next job was coming from and what they were going to do. And their world was thrown upside-down in the past couple of decades. Some people said it was chapter two or whatever, but people had to reinvent themselves, but there was always that sense that they were rejected by what they thought was the establishment and they didn’t know if they were going to go forward.

And then you also have the younger people, the millennials, who have just come out and have always looked at life differently and aren’t necessarily enamored with signing up with a company forever and having a boss tell them what to do. But the one universal thing that they all have now is immediate opportunity. That person who’s been thrown out there, there are tons of things that they can do and tons of ways that they can use the skills that they’ve developed in their career with freelancing or whatever, even if they wanted to do something like drive for Uber, they can immediately still be out there earning an income. So, for the younger folks, there’s the ability to figure out what they really want to do and take time between jobs and earn additional income doing different things as they figure it out.

The one thing that I think the “YouEconomy” eliminates is the unknown and the fear of not having access to income. And that was something that drove generations of people. I think one of the most interesting things about the “YouEconomy” from our standpoint is the same people, especially when you’re looking at freelancers, have realized that they were selling themselves short by allowing themselves to be employed by other companies. And what they found was that their work was more valuable than they thought it was. And those companies were willing to pay them more as individual contractors than they were paying them as employees, and that they could work for more people.

So, I think that mindset and the ability to take advantage of that has given them a freedom and eliminated a layer of fear that drove people for a long time.

Josh Ellis: And I just want to add to that, because I think your question was a little bit about how widely encompassing this is, at least among the population. With our research; we did a Harris Poll, with more than 2,000 adults, and we found that a third of Americans in the workforce have made money in this way within the last year and millennials are the biggest part of it. Of course, they are now like the largest generation in total numbers, but they only make up just over 50% of the “YouEconomy” workforce. People over 55 are 30% of the “YouEconomy” and there’s also a majority of minority participants, 55% of the people in the “YouEconomy” are racial or ethnic minorities.

And so to your question about whether this is an avenue for just about everybody, I think that our research does support that.

Samir Husni: What role does the printed Success magazine play in all of this and how do the other platforms fit in: the books, videos, website and your video courses? Is the print magazine the anchor for all of this or just a part of it? What drives that relationship that you want to establish between the brand and those generations?

Josh Ellis: You mention all of the different avenues that we have to put the good news about this out and express it to as many people as we can, but yes, the print magazine was the lead edge. That’s where we really wanted to plant the flag was with that identifiable cover that we have on the August issue.

Jim was getting to the point that a lot of the time people who worked in companies and then became freelancers didn’t realize until after the fact just what a great opportunity this was and I think that’s what our issue is, it’s like a siren call kind of thing to jostle people into understanding what the opportunity is for them now, with what technology has made possible and changes in the economy have made possible.

And in the August issue, it isn’t just about the cover story where we’re expressing the total opportunity of the “YouEconomy,” but it’s also every feature in the issue is designed to either speak to people of a certain background, whether they’re women or younger people or older people or anyone wanting to start a traditional business.

Or take on something like an Uber’s job, which we‘ve mentioned a couple of times, but that’s just one of the many avenues into this. There are so many others; you can walk dogs and make a living doing it now and find work doing that at the touch of a button on your iPhone. There are also direct selling opportunities where people can find a product that they’re really passionate about and share that with other people in their network. So, what we tried to do was use the entire issue to really highlight what’s available.

Samir Husni: How important do you feel it is to spread this message that print is still viable in this digital age?

Jim McCabe: This is more of a general statement of how we look at print as part of our brand. We’re very, very happy to be in the magazine business and we look at the print product as a powerful opportunity for us to be able to put out issues like the “You Economy” issue with careful study of interesting issues that are effecting our readers lives in a way that only print can do it. And that is in a format that is long-form, and that people can spend time with and can share with others and that’s durable.

We went through a redesign a year ago and as part of that redesign we talked a lot about what we wanted the print product to do and be in our universe of users and readers. And one of the things that we talked a lot about was, and one of the reasons that we changed our paper stock and other things that we did, was because durability was something that was important. We want the print product to be something that people save, use and refer back to and is part of a library that they use in developing the strategy they have to build their own personal level of success.

And as Josh said, by taking the entire edit well and looking at this story from different personal angles, from different contributors, that’s something that people will invest hours in and they’ll all invest hours in a print product to do that. So, that’s why for us as a magazine and a media brand that is targeted to people and that really wants to be partners with people as they journey to success; that’s why the print product is so important for us. It’s the place where we can have the longer form discussion; it’s durable and we have all of the avenues where people can continue that discussion socially and online and we give them day-to-day inspiration with those vehicles, but nothing can replace print as the durable place for a long-form discussion.

Josh Ellis: The other thing too is this was such an important tent-pole for our brand as a whole and in really helping our readers to understand what we’re about and to sort of define, whether they knew it or not, who our readers are. And the cover story alone is 6,000 words, and that’s just something that you don’t see online very much. People will not sit down for the hour that it takes to read a story that long and from the same website and keep scrolling and scrolling, but in print it’s an enjoyable read, because of things like layout and the feel of the paper.

We thought it was so important for our readers to get the entire sense of what has developed in the “You Economy” that print is the perfect place to really make the announcement.

 Samir Husni: Is there anything else that you’d like to add?

Jim McCabe: Just that we’re very, very proud of it and I’m extremely proud of it because this is the reflection of Josh’s leadership, taking over the magazine and producing such a quality product so quickly. And taking on a subject that I think is really interesting and newsworthy and groundbreaking. And it’s a reflection of how great a staff he put together for us to be able to do this.

As I said before, we’re happy to be in the magazine business and this is a reflection of the talented group of people we have under Josh.

Josh Ellis: I think that a lot of times a national magazine that isn’t in the New York sphere can be easy to overlook, but doing big issues and really getting out there and trying to produce something that will make a statement is an important way to create some brand awareness. And so this was really a huge issue for the magazine and for everything that we do at Success.

Samir Husni: If I showed up unexpectedly to your house one evening after work, what would I find you doing; reading a magazine, reading your iPad, watching television, or something else?

Jim McCabe: I’m usually catching up on the day’s news one way or the other, either scanning CNN or Bloomberg or something, or catching up with the Journal or The New York Times or the Post or some of the things that I have to read every day, but haven’t gotten to, and possibly exercising and trying to squeeze that in as well.

Josh Ellis: I love to cook; I try to do that as much as I can. But I am a subscriber to several magazines, so I will take some time and read through a few long-form pieces a week. Other than that, playing with the dog or playing video games. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Jim McCabe: These days? The state of politics in the U.S. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: (Laughs too).

Jim McCabe: That really does worry me, because I just think that we’re in a place now where we’ve pushed out a good group of people, a moderate group of people and we’re constantly debating on the fringes as opposed to trying to understand all of the amazing blessings and things we have here. And it’s an uneasy time. I have children and they’re going to live in a different world than I lived in, and although they have the opportunities of the “YouEconomy” which is great, I’m just hoping that they can enjoy all of that, plus the freedoms and happiness that I had.

Josh Ellis: I’m easily fixated on some kind of content that I’m enjoying, so whether I’m reading a magazine story or a book or watching something on Netflix, I have contrary to what a lot of people assume about my generation, a pretty good attention span, so I’m willing to invest some time in entertainment or to learn something new, or to just think about one thing for a long time. I don’t have any great fears like Jim, but I’m happy to sit down with something and enjoy for a good while.

Samir Husni: Thank you.

 

 




Ketchum Names Barri Rafferty Global President

By CommPRO Editorial Staff

Barri RaffertyKetchum Names Barri Rafferty Global President has been appointed worldwide president of Ketchum, effective immediately. This leadership shift follows the creation of Ketchum’s new 20-person Global Leadership Council (GLC) and the Break Through Advisory Board, which together bring in new voices and perspectives to its senior leadership team while activating disruptive thinking from all levels and corners of the agency. Rafferty’s appointment marks an era of accelerated innovation as the firm works to realize its vision to become the most valued agency in the world.

As Rafferty assumes the role of president, current president and CEO Rob Flaherty takes on the title of chairman and CEO, following Ray Kotcher’s transition to non-executive chairman in January.

In her new role as president, Barri will help advance the great momentum we already have underway, seize new opportunities and help manage our anticipated growth on a global basis,” said Flaherty. “An innovator and change agent for the firm for more than 20 years, Barri is distinctly qualified. She has a proven track record of anticipating the next shift in the marketing-communications landscape and blazing a path for new practice areas and divisions to meet our clients’ needs, delivering break through results, and developing and empowering our people to be successful.”

Rafferty joined Ketchum in 1994 and, since 2012, has led Ketchum’s North America business, its largest region, through a period of growth and business expansion. She anticipated the need for such practice areas as Ketchum Sports & Entertainment and Ketchum Digital, which she cultivated from a small creative team to an organization of more than 100 strategists, developers, producers and content creators. As president, Rafferty will work closely with senior leadership of the firm to guide agency strategy and business development. She will continue to oversee Ketchum’s North America offices as well as Ketchum Digital,Ketchum Sports & Entertainment, and complementary businesses Access Emanate Communications, Capstrat and Harrison & Shriftman.

Said Rafferty, “I am honored to assume the role of president from Rob, and I appreciate his confidence in me. Ketchum is filled with amazingly talented people, and I am motivated to unleash their full potential, to continue to champion innovation that anticipates client needs, and to enhance our creative resources and borderless approach to deliver business-building work. It is a great time for our industry and for Ketchum, and I am thrilled to be part of this exciting journey.”

During her 22-year tenure at Ketchum, Rafferty has held several other strategic roles, including overseeing the Global Brand Marketing Practice and serving as office director for the firm’s largest office, New York, as well as leading Ketchum South’sAtlanta and Dallas offices. In addition to providing exceptional agency leadership and client counsel to top brands and organizations, Rafferty has devoted time to mentor and develop key talent. She is an advocate for women’s leadership, a member of the governing body of OmniWomen, Omnicom’s Leading Women’s Network, and she has spoken on this topic on global, cross-industry stages including at the World Economic Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos. She also has supported important steps toward creating a more diverse agency, including appointing the firm’s first SVP and director of diversity and inclusion for North America in 2014.

Rafferty also has been involved with a number of groups, from the World Economic Forum’s sustainability taskforce to the Arthur W. Page Society’s Page Up program. Rafferty also sits on the executive board of StepUp, an organization with the mission of empowering girls from under-resourced communities to become confident, college-bound and career focused. She is a former chapter president and President’s Award winner from PRSA-NY and was a 2015 recipient of the Plank Center’s Milestones in Mentoring Award.

“Barri embodies the future of our agency, and our industry. She is an exceptional leader, client counselor, business partner and mentor. She is committed to the success and growth of the agency and our clients, and equally is a thought leader and advocate for the industry as a whole,” said Flaherty.




The Right to Remain Silent?

The Right to Remain SilentBy Filomena Fanelli, CEO/Founder, Impact PR & Communications, Ltd.

One of my favorite bits of public relations advice to give is this: build relationships when things are good. If you proactively tell your story, you prevent someone else from telling it for you.

This past week our social media newsfeeds were chock full of images of police officers, along with heavy-hearted sentiments from those shocked and hurt by the violence in Dallas, where officers were senselessly killed. Then there was Louisiana and Minnesota. These are hardly the first times social media chatter centered on police departments. Remember Ferguson? Or the discussions surrounding the Los Angeles Police Department and brutality?

Officers are often the subject of the media and public’s fascination – and scrutiny. One moment a departments’ actions are questioned, the next moment those same men and women in blue are lauded as heroes. With all of this attention comes great responsibility and a need to connect with the very communities each police department serves through clear, consistent communications. Is it time to consider PR for the PD? Perhaps.

In recent years, many police departments have turned to public relations firms for assistance on that front. Some are doing so to stay ahead of a crisis; others to manage a situation that has already grabbed headlines or spun out of control. A few examples come to mind.

Three months ago, the Honolulu Police Department announced that it had retained a public relations firm for the first time ever. Among the agency’s duties are to media train staff and leadership, perform research, offer branding advice, strategic counsel and crisis communications assistance. Sounds wise, right? Now the kicker: the move was made following public criticism about Chief Louis Kealoha and his wife, Deputy Prosecutor Katherine Kealoha, and court cases involving disputes with family members. Accusations of police misconduct related to the investigation were made, but the Deputy Chief Marie McCauley, in a statement, noted that the impetus behind retaining a public relations firm was to “expand our team’s capacity to communicate clearly and effectively to our community as we protect and serve.”

A year ago, after several years of negative attention, the Portsmouth Police Department brought on a PR firm with a niche in representing police and fire departments. The agency’s mission was to highlight some of the positive activities within the department, handle social media training for officers, disseminate news and respond to media inquiries and incidents. The most interesting part about the agency’s direction? It wanted to eliminate missed opportunities to talk about the world of good these officers were doing in keeping the community safe and making it a wonderful place to live in, work in or visit.

Ferguson hired a public relations firm after the city became synonymous with racial profiling and police brutality. Then the very act of hiring an agency to protect its image – and one that was not at all diverse – caused more negative chatter. In this instance, timing was everything. Had that same firm already been in place as part of an ongoing public relations effort, the outcome may have been different.

The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) now has a robust media relations department to better respond to news media, keep the public informed on its activities and to stay on top of the public’s perception of the force. Smart move, LAPD, smart move.

There are certainly examples of getting it right. For instance, the Topeka Police Department recently hired a PR outreach person to engage in social and traditional media outreach. In a communication style that oozes 2016, the newly appointed PR person shared her plans to put together an “Ask the Chief” session to allow Topeka’s Police Chief James Brown to more personally interact with the public on Facebook and Twitter and announced the formation of “Tweet Alongs,” Twitter-based versions of ride-alongs that more fully explain what each unit does and encourage a two-way conversation.

While police departments all over the United States face enormous challenges by the very virtue of their work and the real-time responsiveness that today’s media environment demands, the need for trust and transparency are always present. Telling a story is as important for public agencies as it is for private companies (and perhaps even more so). Do police departments have the right to remain silent? Maybe. Should they? In a world where what you say can and will be used against you, and one where what you don’t say can be just as problematic, I’d think twice.

About the Author: Filomena Fanelli is the CEO and founder of Impact PR & Communications, Ltd., an award-winning public relations firm based in Poughkeepsie, NY. She is also an adjunct professor at Marist College’s School of Communication and the Arts. Filomena can be reached at filomena@prwithimpact.com




Empowering Data-Driven PR Leaders of Tomorrow (Free Webinar On-Demand)

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Webinar Overview

This panel of industry influencers will discuss the traits of the successful PR leader of tomorrow.  Being a public relations professional in today’s rapidly moving, digitally driven landscape certainly has its challenges, but also tremendous opportunities to set yourself apart from others—yet only if you are brave enough to make the jump.  Our panel will discuss why these traits are important, and how agency and brand leaders can set their employees and staff up for success. For those on the AE, Manager, or Director levels the idea is to help them understand what thinking and skills are required to truly become a PR leader.

Webinar will include exploration and discussion around the following:

  1. Examples of PR industry leaders who have really paved the way, and what can we learn from them?
  2. What does it mean to be a PR leader and why is it important?
  3. What traits/skills are required for being a PR leader?
  4. What are some of the challenges that face PR professionals today and prevent us from becoming leaders, not just with the PR/Comms function, but also in terms of the larger organization?

Moderator

Rebekah IliffRebekah Iliff…..@rebekahiliff

Chief Strategy Officer

AirPR

Rebekah Iliff is the Chief Strategy Officer for AirPR, a technology platform to increase PR performance. She is currently a columnist for Mashable, Inc., and Entrepreneur, and her contributing writing can be seen in everything from Forbes to the Huffington Post. Additionally, Rebekah frequently moderates and participates on panels focused on the future of PR and big data. In 2014, Rebekah was named by Dell as a “Dell Influencer” and has been asked to sit on industry panels and think tanks dedicated to innovation, technology trends, PRTech, and social good. In 2015, Onalytica, the leading influencer relationship management software company, cited her as one of the Top 100 PR Influencer’s in the world. She holds a B.A. in Philosophy from Loyola University Chicago, and an M.A. in Organizational Management and Applied Community Psychology from Antioch University at Los Angeles (AULA).

Panelists

KayAnn-UpdatedKayAnn Schoeneman…..@KSchoeneman

Senior VP Global Research & Analytics

Ketchum

KayAnn P. Schoeneman is an accomplished public and corporate affairs specialist with over 10 years of experience. She has managed complex national and international public and corporate affairs campaigns for foreign governments, Fortune 100 companies and leading trade associations. Among her areas of expertise include ally development, coalition building, issue advocacy, influencer engagement and research and measurement including focus groups and surveys. KayAnn has been active in national, state and local elections for more than a decade. In 2002, she served as an opposition researcher for the Political Division of the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) where she edited, reviewed and revised print, television and radio ads for the NRCC’s successful $50 million issue advocacy effort. Active in her community, KayAnn was recently elected President of the Monticello Council of Republican Women (MCRW), a Virginia Federation of Republican Women sanctioned club representing the 11th Congressional District of Virginia. She is also an active member of Washington Women in PR (WWPR).

 

Jennefer Witter op-ed on Donald TrumpJennefer Witter…..@JenneferTBG

CEO and Founder

The Boreland Group

Jennefer Witter is the chief executive officer and founder of The Boreland Group Inc. (TBG – www.theborelandgroup.com), a thirteen year old boutique public relations firm headquartered in New York City. The agency was selected by TheStreet.com as one of five national, black owned businesses making a buzz (www.thestreet.com/story/11376639/4/5-black-owned-businesses-making-a-buzz.html). Witter was named one of the nation’s “10 most successful black CEOS and entrepreneurs” by MadameNoire Magazine (https://tinyurl.com/lzt5l6w).

Jennefer is the author of “The Little Book of Big PR: 100+ Quick Tips to Get Your Small Business Noticed,” published by AMACOM, the book publishing division of the American Management Association. She has appeared in Fast Company, the Associated Press, TheStreet.com, Bloomberg Radio, MarketWatch Radio Network and Crain’s New York Business. She has been profiled by The Huffington Post and The Amsterdam News. Her articles have been published in Business Insider, AMA Quarterly, CommPRO.Biz and numerous small business publications. Previously, she was the public relations expert for Inc.com TV and a contributor to AOL Small Business.

Jennefer has presented at military, trade and academic venues on regional, national and global platforms, on public relations, communication and professional growth topics. Venues include: The Pentagon; the United Nations; The Brookings Institution; The Sea Service Leadership Association’s Annual Symposium; the 92nd Street Y; American University; Ellevate Network; and Women’s President Educational Organization. Jennefer was the keynote speaker at Brown Brothers Harriman’s “Women’s Summit” and The Communication Leadership Exchange’s Annual Conference.

Jennefer is a passionate advocate for women in the workplace. She is an active member of Ellevate Network, a global networking organization for professional women, and serves on the advisory board for Women inPower, a 92nd Street Y led venture that seeks to support and promote senior level professional women to C-level positions. Jennefer is increasing her support of active duty service women and veterans through groups such as SWAN and Mission Getting to NEXT.

Jennefer was formerly a vice president at Ketchum, an award-winning global communications firm. There, she launched a sub-practice that generated one million dollars in revenue in its first year. She has represented numerous businesses throughout her career, from Silicon Valley start-ups to Fortune 500 companies, including IBM and FedEx.

Jennefer holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications (Print Journalism) from New York City’s Fordham University. While at Fordham, she worked at WFUV Radio, which was then student run. She produced and hosted the weekly black public affairs program, “Out Front.” Jennefer received a Regents Diploma from Brooklyn Technical High School, one of the country’s leading STEM schools.

Julia Monti HeadshotJulia Monti…..@JAmonti

Vice President, Global Communications

MasterCard

Julia Monti is vice president of global communications at MasterCard, overseeing communications for the core product group. In this role, she drives engagement around the benefits of a world beyond cash. A seasoned PR professional,Julia draws upon expertise and best practices from her background in the corporate, non-profit and agency worlds. Prior to joining MasterCard, she served as vice president for global communications at Nielsen, combining her love for great TV content, her fascination with the digital evolution and a desire to understand what makes consumers tick. Please connect with Julia via LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/in/juliamonti.

Presented by AirPR-register




Just Don’t Call Me a “Mompreneur”

Just Don’t Call Me a “Mompreneur”By Filomena Fanelli, CEO/Founder, Impact PR & Communications, Ltd.

I may get some backlash on this one, but I’m going to be brave and just say it: I hate the cutesy names assigned to female entrepreneurs and women in leadership positions.

You’ve probably heard a few of them, flippantly called someone one of these names or, if you’re a female, maybe even identified yourself this way without giving it a second thought. Mompreneur. Lady boss. Femmepreneur. Career woman. Girl boss. Business mama. Mommy mogul. And my least favorite – boss babe.

So, what’s the big deal with all of these labels? In a word, they are minimizing. Long before my husband and I had our two fabulous children, we worked hard and were leaders. We achieved great things and dared to take risks. I’ve never once called my husband a career man or a working dad – and I’d rather not put those qualifiers on myself.

I spend my days as a professional communicator counseling clients about the power behind word choice and the importance of positioning and messaging. I carefully craft copy and ask businesses to consider how they are portrayed in the media and among their target audiences. Shouldn’t I – and my fellow entrepreneurs and executives, particularly in the public relations and communications industry – do the same?

As we head more deeply into election season and an international spotlight is placed on Hillary Clinton’s presidency bid, the message we send to the men and women around the boardroom table, and to a future generation of leaders, becomes that much more important. Is Clinton a presidential candidate or a lady leader? Am I a woman running a business or a girl boss?

If I pass on an interview for a mompreneur radio show or turn my nose up at the thought of a cutesy hashtag announcing my #BossBabe status, it’s because I want my two daughters to know that they are more than simply female. If we take the focus off the size of a woman’s heels, her attire (who cares if I wear a form-fitting dress or a modest pantsuit?) and her family size and place it back where it belongs, on her business acumen, we’ll be well on our way to true gender equality. Before that can happen, we all – women included – need to mind our words.

About the Author: Filomena Fanelli is the CEO and founder of Impact PR & Communications, Ltd., an award-winning public relations firm based in Poughkeepsie, NY. She is also an adjunct professor at Marist College’s School of Communication and the Arts. Filomena can be reached at filomena@prwithimpact.com

 




What Do People Want…at Work?

LeslieGrossmanLeadership2By Leslie Grossman, Chair, Vistage International

Ten to 20 years ago, the million dollar question was “what do women want?” There was even a film back in 2000 called “What Women Want” starring Mel Gibson and Helen Hunt. Even in 2016 you will still find plenty of articles claiming to have the answer to the woman want question. However, the question today most are asking is “what do millennials want?”

Corporations, agencies and professional service firms seem to be searching for the millennial answer as they hire recent college grads and find most quit within 12 – 18 months. The truth is that companies are beginning to get a clearer picture of what the M-generation wants and they don’t like it one bit.

Most companies are stubbornly refusing to change the policies of the past. They insist that millennials will have to get used to the old ways. They should stop wanting things their way and buckle down and act like employees of two decades ago.

The babble is that millennials want flexibility; they want to be stimulated by their work; they want to be promoted fast; they want to know their career path as an employee; they want to change the world and have their employer support their causes; and they want to understand the purpose their employer serves. They even want their employer to trust them to work at home when they want and take vacations at will. They must be crazy.

The crazier thing is that 2016 is not 2000. The world has changed as much as the new generation of workers. Even the tried and true workers of today who started a decade or two ago want many of the same things that millennials want. Change is hard. Change can be painful. Creating a corporate culture that fulfills people’s lives while delivering an A+ at work in the new world requires employer flexibility, trust, a willingness to adapt to changing times and a new view of the world. The queries “what do women want?” or “what do millennials want?” may no longer be relevant in today’s world.

The present workplace question that companies need to ask is “what do people want?” The answer lies in asking employees of all ages what they want and looking for innovative ways to meet their needs and make them happy. Happy people do good work. They are loyal and high-performing. It is no longer the big paycheck and long hours that get the best from the best. It’s time for companies to act a little ‘crazy’ and deliver to employees what they want.

About the Author:  Leslie Grossman, author of “LINK OUT: How to Turn Your Network into a Chain of Lasting Connections” (Wiley), is a Vistage International Chair in New York City.  She was CEO of Communications/Marketing Action and Women’s Leadership Exchange and is a leadership and business development strategist, speaker and coach at Leslie Grossman Leadership.   Leslie can be reached at leslie@lesliegrossmanleadership.com. 




Mr. Magazine™ Selects ‘InStyle’ – The Hottest Magazine Launch Of The Past 30 Years

You can’t have the 30 Hottest Magazine Launches of the Past 30 Years without calling out the current Hottest Publisher, Editor and Designer(s) who have put their respective magazine(s) through its paces to land it in this most elite of groups. Announcements of the winners were made at the min 30 Event on April 14 at the Grand Hyatt in New York.

On any given day, Mr. Magazine™ can be seen flipping through individual copies of new magazine launches, but I can also be found thumbing happily among those legacy brands that have led the way for all those new titles that have followed, such as in the case of the 30 Hottest Launches of the Past 30 Years.

And in doing so, I have observed the trails that have been blazed in both the editorial and designer forests, and with the advertising revenue streams that run perpendicular to those creative trails, only to connect somewhere a little farther down the path to become the communal force of nature that they are when joined.

The result was the Hottest Publisher, Editor, and Designer of the past 30 years. After all, you can’t have hot magazines without equally smoking people. So, as difficult as it was to choose among the stellar talent out there, I somehow managed to do it, and during the same epiphany came up with five questions to ask each of them.

Without further ado, we begin with our Hottest Publisher of the Last 30 Years:
Hubert Boehle, President, CEO, Bauer Media Group USA, LLC.

HUBERT_BOEHLE_CEO[2]

Samir Husni: What do you think has been the biggest challenge in your career and how did you overcome that challenge?

Hubert Boehle: I faced the biggest challenge of my career right after I joined Bauer Media in the U.S. in 1989. The company had just launched First for Women and even though we spent millions on TV ads the magazine just didn’t hit its target numbers. The problem was that we had badly underestimated the readers’ attachment to the Seven Sisters. The launch plan was to offer a magazine similar in content but younger than the established magazines, but – contrary to our experience in Europe – focus group attendants kept telling us: “I trust this old brand; my mother used to read it and so will I.” My boss at the time, Konnie Wiederholz, charged me with getting the magazine to profitability. I wanted that challenge, but at the same time I was scared to death because I was inexperienced and had almost no familiarity with the American marketplace. As you know, First is still around and has been a healthy magazine for close to 30 years, so obviously it all worked out. Our first goal was to stem the losses. We used all the tricks you learn in Publishing 101: cutting costs, firing up the ad sales team, raising the cover price, changing frequency, fine-tuning the editorial product. I took some of these actions with bated breath. Not all of them worked, but all in all the changes were successful, and I felt like an Olympic finalist when we finally crossed the break-even point.

Samir Husni: What has been the most pleasant moment in your career so far?

Hubert Boehle: Probably that too happened during the relaunch of First for Women, and it taught me the power of reader-focused editorial. In its initial years, First suffered from terrible price elasticity. We raised the cover price twice, from $1.00 to $1.25 and from $1.25 to $1.50. Both increases were a waste of time, because we lost so much circulation that the net effect was close to zero. So the market was sending us a clear message: your original launch idea – an eighth sister for younger readers – stinks!

The decisive turnaround happened when we noticed that the magazine sold better with topics that addressed the reader not in her roles as mother, cook and housewife, but as a young woman with personal needs and interests. We did well when we covered topics like hairstyles and diets on the cover and we lost to the competition when we offered Seven Sisters staples like household tips, recipes and crafts.

So we finally changed the editorial positioning of the magazine to what we still use as our tagline: We put you first! Looking at women’s magazines today, it’s hard to believe that would make such a big difference, but back then, the focus on fashion, beauty, health, nutrition and diet was a real USP. After this repositioning, we went through with a hefty price increase, from $1.50 to $1.99 and this time we didn’t lose a single copy in sales.

Samir Husni: Looking at the industry as a whole, do you think we are better off today than the “good ol’ days?”

Hubert Boehle: This would be the moment for me to say, “There’s never been a better time for quality journalism,” but, let’s face it, the “good ol’ days” weren’t just good, they were mind-blowing. Magazine publishing was like a license to print money and you had to spend a lot of time golfing not to achieve double-digit margins.

From that perspective, it’s difficult to be nostalgia-proof. Revenues and margins are under pressure and nobody expects that magazine publishing as an industry can return to the old way of doing business. For the last few years, every publishing house has had to adapt to this new reality of shrinking returns, and we will need to keep on finding new ways of managing our business and, most of all, new business. I wish I knew what exactly that new business will be; my guess is there will not be one solution that will fit all, and instead, a number of different paths depending on each publisher’s particular know-how.

Samir Husni: From a publisher’s point of view how do you view the future or the “publishing” profession?

Hubert Boehle: There’s no doubt that we will go through a period of intense changes. My hope is that the change will be a transformation, rather than a disruption, of the current situation. I hope we publishers will be able to use the capital, the talent and the know-how we have gathered to, on the one hand, keep our magazines attractive enough so they continue to find readers, and, on the other hand, to successfully invest in new activities. Platform agnostic is the sexy new phrase, and I am more optimistic than I was a few years ago that we will be successful in developing significant new revenue streams.

Samir Husni: What is your reaction to being named the hottest publisher of the past 30 years?

Hubert Boehle: Samir, we were fortunate enough to win your “Launch of the Year” award a few times and I always felt honored because you choose your top launch based on how you gauge a new title’s appeal to the reader, and you’ve never been afraid of going against the grain; for example, your vote for Simple Grace this year. And the same can be said for In Touch in 2002 because the title was nothing but a little rebel at the time. So to receive this award – not to mention the million-dollar prize that comes with it – is a special moment in my professional life.

HCI
Hottest Editor of the Past 30 Years:
Ellen Levine, Editorial Director, Hearst Magazines

Samir Husni: What do you think has been the biggest challenge in your career and how did you overcome that challenge?

Ellen Levine: I actually love challenges – I find them engaging. Starting new magazines is a creative opportunity that some might see as a challenge, because you need to find true uniqueness and originality, but ultimately it is really a wonderful way to put creativity to work, and I love it.

Samir Husni: What has been the most pleasant moment in your career so far?

Ellen Levine: There have been so many, but one that stands out is launching Food Network Magazine, which we did in the depths of a recession. In fact, the first issue’s on-sale date was the day the market tanked. We didn’t know what would happen, and when the results started coming in, we could see that it was an immediate, huge hit. People really embraced it, it was just what they needed at that moment, which is always what you are trying to achieve.

Another very pleasant moment was when we learned that the first issue of O, The Oprah Magazine had sold out in a little over week and we went back to press to print thousands of additional copies – proof that women truly value Oprah’s advice and wisdom. In both cases, I felt like we had tapped into something special with our content that really resonated with consumers.

Samir Husni: Looking at the industry as a whole, do you think we are better off today than the “good ol’ days?”

Ellen Levine: To me, every yesterday is a good ol’ day, but tomorrow is the future.

Samir Husni: From an editor’s point of view how do you view the future or the “editing” profession?

Ellen Levine: There’s more creativity, more room for experimentation than ever before. The original definition of editing was putting pencil to paper, and we all continue to do that too – editing is and will always be essential in the media business.

Samir Husni: What is your reaction to being named the hottest editor of the past 30 years?

Ellen Levine: It is a huge honor, and in so many ways I have Hearst to thank for it. Our leadership, the editors and publishers that I work with every day – we’re like a family. There’s no other place where I could stretch myself creatively and see things come to fruition the way I have at Hearst, from launching new brands to reshaping and evolving existing ones.

The Hottest Designer(s) of the Past 30 Years:
Robert Priest and Grace Lee of Priest + Grace Design Firm

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Samir Husni: What do you think has been the biggest challenge in your career and how did you overcome that challenge?

Priest + Grace: Remaining relevant as a person and as a designer. Being somebody who constantly believes in reinvention and looking forward.

Samir Husni: What has been the most pleasant moment in your career so far?

Priest + Grace: There have been several things really. Moving to New York, from London via Toronto is certainly one. Teaming up with Grace Lee and the effect our collaboration has had on my creatively has been a revelation to me.

Samir Husni: Looking at the industry as a whole, do you think we are better off today than the “good ol’ days?”

Yes! But of course there are many definite challenges right now. I feel everyone is looking for a new way of communicating, and the jury is out as to which path to follow.

Samir Husni: From a designer’s point of view how do you view the future or the “design” profession?

Priest + Grace: It’s about taste and value to me. If you have good taste and can be flexible there’s a place for you in the future of design. If you have great taste, you’re articulate and you don’t compromise, you are the future of the design.

Samir Husni: What is your reaction to being named the hottest designer of the past 30 years?

Priest + Grace: Incredulous!

The Hottest Magazine Launch Of The Past 30 Years:
In Style

InStyle-1

In 1974 when Time Inc. launched People magazine, many people said that Henry Luce was probably turning over in his grave at how an institution like Time Inc., with titles such as TIME, Fortune and LIFE, were marching through the celebrity neighborhoods with a magazine called People.

However, little did they know that People would change the course of the history of magazines when it came to celebrities and human interest, and needless to say, People also became a major cornerstone in the world of magazine business.

Move forward to 1994; literally ripping a page from the success of People, Time Inc. launched a brand-new baby, born from the womb of the master mother: a baby they named InStyle. The same remarks were made about the infant as there had been about its famous mom two decades before. ‘Why would a company that deals with news and weeklies go into the fashion market? Why would they publish a women’s magazine that was heavily focused on style and beauty?’ The same doubts, with basically the same naysayers as there had been with People, spouting the same disparagements.

When People was launched there was very little competition in its category, but when InStyle hit newsstands, the fashion field was robust and ripe with some heavy-hitters such as Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar and Elle. InStyle had to swallow its nervousness and compete with three giants.

But not only did the magazine compete; it carved a niche for itself and did something the others didn’t do, it humanized celebrities. Suddenly people were seeing celebrities in a more personal and relaxed environment, proving that the magazine had a different access to their favorite stars than the others did, making InStyle unique.

The magazine made celebrities, style and fashion accessible to the masses without degrading the subjects they were covering and humanized the personality behind the famous name.

And of course, InStyle is not just limited to the United States. Currently the magazine is being distributed as international editions in 17 other countries including: Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Brazil, Greece, South Korea, Spain, Russia, Turkey and South America. Its digital footprint is strong as well, with a website and app that keeps the brand in your face, right where it should be.

InStyle fits the criterion excellently that was required and needed to wear the title: The Hottest Launch of the Past 30 Years.

Click here for the Hottest 30 Magazine Launches of the Past 30 Years




Gender Differences in Workplace Communication

Carol Kinsey Goman, Ph.D

A few years ago, I conducted research in the United States, Europe and Canada to see how gender differences in communication were displayed in the workplace. The first thing I found was that both men and women identified the same sets of strengths and weaknesses in themselves and each other.

Top Three Communication Strengths For Females:

1. Ability to read body language and pick up nonverbal cues.

2. Good listening skills.

3. Effective display of empathy.

Top Three Communication Weaknesses For Females:

1. Overly emotional.

2. Meandering – won’t get to the point.

3. Not authoritative.

Top Three Communication Strengths For Males:

1. Commanding physical presence.

2. Direct and to-the-point interactions.

3. Effective display of power.

Top Three Communication Weaknesses For Males:

1. Overly blunt and direct.

2. Insensitive to audience reactions.

3. Too confident in own opinion.

In the workplace, people are continuously — and often unconsciously — assessing your communication style for two sets of qualities: warmth (empathy, likeability, caring) and authority (power, credibility, status).

There is no “best” communication style for all business interactions – and, certainly, there are many exceptions to the generalities I’m presenting – but typically women have the edge in collaborative environments where listening skills, inclusive body language and empathy are more highly valued, and men are thought to “take charge” more readily and viewed as more effective in environments where decisiveness is critical. Men are also judged to be better at monologue – women at dialogue.

Women display more “warm” body language cues. They are more likely to focus on those who are speaking by orienting head and torso to face participants. They lean forward, smile, synchronize their movements with others, nod and tilt their heads (the universal signal of listening, literally “giving someone your ear”).

Men send more “status” signals through an array of dominant behaviors, such as side-to-side head shaking, anger and disgust expressions. They stand tall or they sprawl, sitting with their legs spread or widely crossed, their materials spread out on a conference table, and their arms stretched out on the back of a chair.

In all cases, a communication style turns into a weakness when overdone. A female’s collaborative approach can come across submissive and a male’s directness can be taken as callousness. Men come across as too aggressive when their expansive postures infringe on other people’s personal space, when they have a “death grip” handshake, and when they emphasize status cues to the point where look haughty and uncaring. Women are viewed as weak or passive when they are unnecessarily apologetic, when they smile excessively or inappropriately, and when they discount their own ideas and achievements.

Here are a few more examples comparing communication styles at work:

To a woman, good listening skills include making eye contact and reacting visually to the speaker. To a man, listening can take place with a minimum of eye contact and almost no nonverbal feedback. (Women often cite a lack of eye contact as evidence that their male boss “doesn’t value my input.”)

When a man nods, it means he agrees. When a woman nods, it means she agrees or is listening or is encouraging another to continue speaking.

Men have a greater ability to hold their emotions in check and to “keep a poker face” in business situations. Women are more spontaneously emotionally expressive and have less ability in controlling their emotions displays.

Because they better at accessing the full message (words and body language), women are better at gauging reactions. This allows them to evaluate whether or not they are being understood, and to adjust accordingly. Female superiority in reading nonverbal signals is sometimes thwarted by men’s ability to mask their facial expressions.

Women sound more emotional because they use approximately five tones when speaking – and their voices rise under stress. Men only use approximately three tones, and their deeper voices sound more confident. But, because men don’t have a wide vocal range, they have a tendency to become monotone.

Men expand into physical space, while women tend to condense their bodies — keeping their elbows to their sides, tightly crossing their legs, stacking their materials in small, neat piles, and contracting their bodies to take up as little space as possible. Men’s expansive posture not only looks more confident, it helps create the corresponding feeling of confidence. By contrast, when a woman’s posture makes her look smaller, it also makes her feel less powerful.

Women too often have from a “good student” mentality, believing that people in charge will notice their hard work and positive results and promote them. Men are more aware that they need to promote themselves (and their hard work and positive results) to get ahead.

As women make decisions, they tend to process and think of options out loud. Men process internally and don’t speak until they come up with a solution.

Men’s relative discomfort dealing with emotion leads them to look for solutions. Women more readily understand that sometimes people just need to be heard.

In business meetings, men talk more than women. One perspective on this verbal disparity comes from former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, who – when asked what advice she had for up-and-coming professional women – replied, “Learn to interrupt.”

Two men speaking will angle their bodies slightly, while two women will stand in a more “squared up” position – a stance (when exhibited by males) that most men perceive as confrontational.

Men who don’t know each other well tend to keep a greater distance between them than women who have just met. This difference in interpersonal distance as determined by gender is even true in online communities that use avatars, where many of the unconscious “rules” governing personal space in the physical world can be found in the virtual world.

Men make direct accusations. Women tend to avoid confrontation and prefer indirect accusations.

When considering how gender affects communication, keep in mind that with any human interaction, rarely is anything exact. Still, it is helpful to know when your personal “default” communication style (whatever it may be) is an asset, and when it becomes a deterrent. Comparing your strengths and weaknesses to these generalized gender differences is one place to start. And enlarging your repertoire of communication skills, so you can employ strategies that are most effective under various circumstances, will definitely give you an advantage. The most effective communicators, male and female, are masters at balancing power and empathy signals, so that they come across as both confident and caring.

About the Author: Carol Kinsey Goman, Ph.D. is the author of “The Silent Language of Leaders: How Body Language Can Help – or Hurt – How You Lead.” The impact of body language on leadership effectiveness is a topic she addresses in keynote speeches and seminars on “The Power of Collaborative Leadership.” She can be reached at Carol@CarolKinseyGoman.com

 

 




The Public Relationships of Stories: Context, Connection and Alternative Storytelling Techniques (FREE WEBCAST ON-DEMAND)

Webcast Overview

The practice of public relations for years depended on rational storytelling of facts, stats and proof points that aligned with key messages and were broadcast and told through third party mass media.

The social Web brings to the forefront the value of public relationships that are now build through direct connections with business’ stakeholders –investors, customers, employees and communities of interest. Today, these public relationships require stories that are relevant, contextual and ones that can build deeper connections with stakeholders.

This livestream webcast features corporate social media pioneers Scott Monty and Richard Binhammer, along with digital, social and strategic video innovator Doug Simon.  They will discuss:

  • The impact of technology and the social Web on how we think about telling business stories and the opportunities (and difficulties) of connecting directly with stakeholders.
  • The importance of relevance and context in making connections. Ways to figure out what matters. For example: Instagram is an art museum; Vine is a block party. Communication at each is possible, but very different. Determine how to discern between being an interrupter and an interlocutor​. Provide value by helping your intended audience to achieve its goals.
  • Beyond Text, Alternative Storytelling Techniques: Making your story human; use of visuals; video and livestream; cartoons and more…

Speakers

ScottMonty-150x150 (1)Scott Monty

@scottmonty

Scott Monty is an internationally recognized leader in digital communications, digital transformation, social media and marketing. As CEO and founder of Scott Monty Strategies, he counsels brands and agencies on strategy, executive communications, influencer management, the customer experience, and digital initiatives.

Scott spent six years at Ford Motor Company, as a strategic advisor on crisis communications, influencer relations, digital customer service, innovative product launches and more. He also has a decade of experience in communications and marketing agencies, where he had clients that included IBM Healthcare and Life Sciences, Coca-Cola, American Airlines, T-Mobile, GE Software and more.

He is a board member of the American Marketing Association and an advisor for RPM VenturesMy Dealer ServiceCrowd Companies and Clever Girls Collective. He writes about the changing landscape of business, technology, communications, marketing and leadership at ScottMonty.com, where he distributes the widely acclaimed newsletter The Full Monty, and is the executive editor and co-host of the Sherlock Holmes website and podcast I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere.

RichardBinhammer-150x150 (1)Richard Binhammer

@RBinhammer

Richard Binhammer is one of the first adopters of social media for business. In 2006, he became active in social media by engaging with bloggers who were using their new-found influence to impact brands and corporate reputations. From these beginnings of monitoring blogs through simple web searches, he became an early adopter of Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and Pinterest, leading to strategic adoption of social networks for business purposes. He currently consults on social media strategies, skills assessments/training programs and corporate communications efforts.

From 2006-2012, he was a widely acclaimed corporate leader in experimenting, adopting, analyzing and deploying social media as a tool to help business be social and do better business. As Director on Dell’s Social Media and Community team, he was also responsible for communications, social relations and training while continuing to be active in Dell’s social media outreach and overall adoption across the company.

Binhammer joined Dell in corporate communications as a member of the public affairs team in 2005, managing its community and corporate reputation programs in North America and Asia Pacific. Prior to Dell, he worked with several communications consulting agencies in St. Louis and New York, where he planned and implemented strategic corporate communications to achieve business success and build positive corporate reputations. Before working in corporate communications in the U.S., he worked in Canada as a political aide to senior cabinet ministers. He was involved in running local, provincial and national campaigns and also built a successful lobbying business working with national and international businesses.

DougSimon-150x150 (1)Doug Simon

@DSSimonDoug

Doug Simon is founder and CEO of award-winning media firm D S Simon. His firm pioneered Internet Media Tours and its unique approach to guiding clients, PRketing®, was awarded a trademark by the US patent office. He’s provided strategic counsel and executed campaigns for leading brands and non-profits including Pfizer, Fidelity, Lincoln Financial, Macy’s, HOOD, the Consumer Electronics Association, Whitney Museum of American Art and the American College of Physicians.

Doug is an entertaining and informative speaker on communications topics. He’s been among the top ranked speakers at multiple conferences and spoken at the Impact Leadership 21 Global Summit, PRSA International, PR News, Bulldog Reporter, Software and Information Industry Association conferences, Women & Co and many others. He has provided expert testimony on communications issues during US Senate hearings and founded the award-winning video blog Vlogviews.com.

Doug is frequently quoted in top media across platforms. Television appearances include Dateline NBC, PBS, Reuters, CNN, Fox News Live, First Business and WNBC. He’s appeared on NPR and been quoted in USA Today and on The Huffington Post in addition to numerous trade publications. Doug’s video commentary on the 2012 political conventions was picked up by the humor site Funny or Die. Doug is former VP of PRSA NY Chapter and he was a three-time president of the Publicity Club of New York. Doug began his broadcast career at NBC Sports, where he served as Talent Assistant to Bob Costas. His hobbies include performing stand-up comedy at New York’s top clubs and rooting for terrible sports teams including the Jets and Knicks while still remaining optimistic.

Moderator

SuzanneBlackburn-150x150 (1)Suzanne Blackburn

@SuzBlackburn

Suzanne Blackburn is a business-to-business public relations professional with over 10 years of experience, both on the brand and corporate side of the business. Suzanne leads the external communications strategy for Experian Marketing Services, the second largest marketing technology company in the world and a division of global information services giant Experian PLC.. Suzanne describes her role at Experian as “data-driven storytelling” and leverages Experian’s substantial data assets and analytics expertise to tell relevant stories for niche audiences. Prior to Experian, Suzanne worked on the agency-side, specializing in marketing communications for companies in the advertising/marketing, market research, retail and consumer packaged goods sectors. She is inspired by the data and technology revolution in PR, particularly around measurement and analytics, and wants to empower PR professionals through data science. When’s she’s not telling stories, you can find Suzanne exploring New York City parks, food and events. Follow Suzanne on Twitter at @SuzBlackburn.

 

 

 

 

 

 




Crisis PR – Cologne’s Top Cop Caught in Scandal Backlash

By David Milberg, Author and Entrepreneur

While domestic politics continue to revolve around the all but endless presidential race, international PR has been riveted to particularly horrible allegations coming out of the German city of Cologne. According to various German and international media reports, a “small group of Arab or North African men” brutally attacked and sexually threatened women on New Year’s Eve.

When news that the assaults went unmentioned in early police reports on January 1, people were outraged. Cologne’s police chief, Wolfgang Albers initially made matters worse by misjudging the outcry, and largely dismissing the accusation that local officers were slow to respond to the need to protect the women.

Cologne protests

(Source: Twitter)

German media reported a police description of events: women having to run, terrified, through “mobs” of drunken men just outside one of Cologne’s main train stations. Afterward, even Cologne’s mayor, Henriette Reker, piled on, saying police withheld information from her, stating, “…trust in the Cologne police leadership is significantly shaken…”

Now, in the aftermath of the event, Albers, has been forced into early retirement. While it’s impossible to lay these crimes at his feet, he was “in charge” when they happened, and a raging international public wants blood. According to the Associated Press, the state’s interior minister, Ralf Jaeger, said the move was “necessary to restore public trust and the Cologne police’s ability to act, with a view to upcoming major events.”

The lesson here? Primarily, that you are only as good – and just as responsible – as the members of your team. It’s very likely Albers’ attitude about events was created entirely by reports he received from his officers. After all, the chief was likely nowhere near this event. He had to build his understanding of the situation entirely from the reports and responses of his team, who, obviously, did not handle the scenario well at any level.

Secondarily, message control is vital. Early on in this scandal, many media outlets reported sexual assaults as part of events. Now, a week later, it’s come out that no sexual assaults occurred in this situation. Too late now. When local police failed to quickly and deftly gain control of the narrative, they lost it for good. Now, from a PR perspective, it doesn’t matter what actually happened. The die is cast, and too many people already “know”. Remember, if you are too slow to act when a narrative begins, it’s often as if you did not act at all.

 

 




Crisis in the NFL (Commentaries & Recap-UPDATED)

By Nicole Giovia, Contributing Editor, CommPRO.biz

Throughout the past year, it seems that every week there is a new crisis occurring in the National Football League.  Spousal abuse, child abuse, illegal fire works causing the loss of digits; with problem after problem, the NFL is facing a real PR nightmare.  All the while, Changes have been made behind the scenes in hopes to change the public’s view of the NFL, and its players.

The disaster started with Ray Rice and continued to spiral downward.  Beyond Ray Rice, the NFL faced Adrian Peterson and his child abuse scandal, and Greg Hardy’s domestic violence.  These were just the beginning in a string of domestic violence charges for NFL players.

The latest in the list of seemingly never-ending NFL Crises was #Deflategate.  Turns out, this year’s Super Bowl Champions, the New England Patriots let air out of nearly all of their footballs, giving them an unfair advantage in the AFC Championship Game. The NFL’s “Golden Boy” Tom Brady was suspended for four games for his part in the scandal, a decision that was overturned by a judge today.

The NFL is in desperate need of some positive PR.  As they face criticism from fans, players and sponsors, the NFL must figure out a way out of the crisis and back into the public’s good graces.  The big question is, what is next? What can the NFL do?  If something doesn’t change fast will the NFL every get back to where they once were?

With this page we will dig deeper into the issues that arise from the most recent developments. You are invited to contribute your comments and opinions.

 

david-johnson-featuredDeflategate Ruling – Tom Brady & Roger Goodell Need to Score in the Court of Public Opinion

By David E. Johnson, CEO, Strategic Vision, LLC

One can win in the court of law but still lose in the court of public opinion.  We have just seen this with New England Quarterback Tom Brady.  Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

 

#DeflateGate Crisis Management - The NFL's Next Steps#DeflateGate Crisis Management – Next Moves by the NFL & Tom Brady?

By David E. Johnson, CEO, Strategic Vision, LLC

For the NFL, 2014 was a year of crisis after crisis.  The League and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell came under heavy scrutiny and criticism for failing to punish key NFL players guilty of domestic violence. Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

 

WTwitter-Chat-Recapill the Patriots Make it to The Superbowl?

Twitter Chat Recap

Welcome to our chat, what will the real PR and marketing successes and crisis be surrounding @SuperBowl 49?  Click Here to read the recap.

 

 

 

nfl-logoWhere is the NFL’s Crisis Communications Plan?

By David E. Johnson, CEO, Strategic Vision, LLC

Super Bowl Sunday is less then a week away.  Yet rather then discussing the particulars of the game, the sporting world has been arguing about findings that 11 footballs confiscated from the New England Patriots win over the Indianapolis Colts in the AFC title game were found to be underinflated by two pounds of air each. Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

deflategate#Deflate Gate Holds Our Attention More than the Game

By Todd Murphy, Vice President, Universal Information Services

Yes, we’re still talking about Deflate Gate, #DeflateGate, and Super Bowl 49 is less than a week away. What more can be said on this topic? Nothing. But from an image perspective, my company has looked at the past media exposure for most sports and found one common thread. Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

#Deflategate: Managing the NFL’s Latest Scandal

By David E. Johnson, CEO, Strategic Vision, LLC

The NFL is facing yet another scandal.  No, it doesn’t concern players and domestic violence. This latest scandal involves the New England Patriots and findings that 11 footballs confiscated from the team’s win over the Colts in the AFC title game were found to be underinflated.  Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

Robin-Cohn-headshotWhen The Public Cries Foul

By Robin Cohn, Author, The PR Crisis Bible

One has to wonder.  If some man brutally hit and knocked-out the daughter or wife of an NFL team owner or commissioner, do you think they’d let the man go with a slap on the wrist? I don’t think so—or at least I hope not. But it hasn’t happened to them and that emotional distance has let NFL teams focus on business as usual. Like any best selling product, why would anyone want to pull it off the shelf, or in this case the game —until there’s a public out cry?  Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

Constance-Peak-headshotThe NFL and Respondabilty

By Constance J. Peak is Co-Founder, CFO and Coach at IMPACT Leadership 21

The NFL loves being on the minds of a nation, just not like this.  I’m sure heads are shaking, saying, “Where did it all go wrong?”  There were several missteps made by Roger Goodell in reaction to the Ray Rice incident.  Therein lies the key, he reacted. Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

 

Roger-Goodell-headshot

Roger Goodell
(Source: FreeAllImages.com)

NFL: An Insult to Women Everywhere

By Steven Fink, President and CEO, Lexicon Communications Corp.

In the face of the worst crisis to confront the NFL in its 94 years of existence, commissioner Roger Goodell held a much-anticipated news conference last Friday and for 45-minutes…said nothing. While the media and women’s organizations and right-minded people everywhere were angered by this performance, some people actually applauded Goodell’s complete lack of substance.  Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

 

susan-telllem-headshotThe Spiraling Violence in the NFL

By Susan Tellem, Partner, Tellem Grody PR

Ah. My husband is right in so many ways, including what he calls the over the top worship of football as “the religion of sports.”  Church on Sunday…maybe not.  Football on Sunday TV…most definitely.  If football is about violence, why are we surprised when violence moves from the field to the home?  Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

 

susan-young-headshotSaving Face at the NFL: What’s the Cost?

By Susan Young, CEO,  Get in Front Communications, Inc.

I’d like to thank the NFL for bringing the horrific issue of domestic violence to the forefront of our social conversations and values. Maybe lives will be saved. I’d also like to vomit on the NFL for downplaying (actually ignoring) this horrific issue of domestic violence. Maybe the NFL’s face can be saved. But at what expense?  Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

 

David E. Johnson, CEO of Strategic Vision, LLCimagesNFL Sponsors: What’s their Crisis Management Role?

By David E. Johnson, CEO, Strategic Vision, LLC

Another day has passed and another NFL player has been arrested with domestic violence charges – Arizona Cardinals running back Jonathan Dwyer.  This comes as the NFL is still reeling from the public relations damage of Ray Rice, Adrian Peterson, Greg Hardy, and the admission in court documents that nearly a third of its players could end up with brain damage.  Click here to read the full post.

 

 

steven.fink.featuredNFL in Crisis: Where are the X’s and O’s?

By Steven Fink, President and CEO, Lexicon Communications Corp.

The crisis that is engulfing the NFL is so predictable that it barely holds my professional interest as a crisis manager, and yet, like a large segment of America, I watch it the way you slow down on the highway and watch the mangled wreck of a fatal car crash pushed to the shoulder: horrifying, but riveting nevertheless. Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

 

nfl-logoNFL Crisis Management: Losing in the Court of Public Opinion

By David E. Johnson, CEO, Strategic Vision, LLC

The NFL continues to be battered in the court of public opinion.  Last week it was the Ray Rice saga and the “what did NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell know and when did he know it questions.’  This week it is outrage over Minnesota Viking Adrian Peterson who is facing criminal charges for spanking his four-year old son with a wooden stick that left welts. Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

 

NFL-crisis-managementThe NFL: Game Plan To Improve Future “Performance

By Brian Braudis, Executive Coach & Leadership Consultant 

The near term is likely to get bumpy as the NFL begins to implement its new domestic violence policy.  Prevention is typically easier than rebuilding but nonetheless; the NFL finds itself facing unwanted attention and pressure to make changes. It is sure to get even more unpleasant. As one of my college professors would say, “If you fail to initiate change yourself, a change much harder and much uglier will be thrust upon you.” Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

 

Ray Rice scandalThe Ray Rice Scandal: A Crisis Communications Analysis

Editor’s Note: The Ray Rice Scandal was handled poorly on all fronts: from the way the team reacted and blamed the victim, to the seemingly soft punishment by the NFL to Ray Rice himself briefly apologizing then quickly moving on. Not only is his image inevitably tarnished, but the NFL, Team and even “supporters” will be left to pick up the pieces. With this page we will dig deeper into the issues that now arise from the most recent developments. You are invited to contribute your comments and opinions.  Click here to read the full post.

 

 

 

#Deflategate:

**UPDATE**

Tom Brady Deflate-Gate: Federal Judge Throws Out NFL Star’s Suspension
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/sports/tom-brady-deflate-gate-federal-judge-throws-out-nfl-stars-n419476

Another Twist in the “Deflate-Gate” Scandal as the NFL Look Set to Appeal Brady’s Ban Being Quashed
https://www.newstalk.com/Theres-another-twist-for-Tom-Brady-in-the-deflategate-saga

Tom Brady Wins the Long Game
https://www.newyorker.com/news/sporting-scene/tom-brady-wins-the-long-game

Greg Cote: Tom Brady Wins Big; NFL, Commissioner Roger Goodell Lose Even More
https://www.miamiherald.com/sports/spt-columns-blogs/greg-cote/article33737655.html

How Roger Goodell Became the Most Powerful Man in American Sports
https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/redskins/how-roger-goodell-became-the-most-powerful-man-in-american-sports/2015/09/02/3eb69baa-50d8-11e5-9812-92d5948a40f8_story.html

P.R. Chief Paul Hicks Leaves the NFL
https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/09/01/p-r-chief-paul-hicks-leaves-the-nfl/

Roger Goodell Isn’t Going Anywhere, But A Changing of Guard is Underway
https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/writer/jason-la-canfora/25289125/roger-goodell-isnt-going-anywhere-but-a-changing-of-guard-underway

 

Before The Decision:

Deflategate: 10 Things to Know About Latest Patriots Controversy/Scandal
https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/eye-on-football/24982457/deflategate-10-things-to-know-about-latest-patriots-controversy/scandal

Effects Of Inflation: Once Again, We’re Talking About Football
https://www.courant.com/sports/football/hc-jacobs-column-patriots-0121-20150120-column.html#page=1

Deflategate Fallout: Lack of Candor Could End Up Biting Patriots, Belichick
https://www.foxsports.com/nfl/story/super-bowl-2015-deflategate-new-england-patriots-bill-belichick-012115

#Deflategate: Blame it on the Rain, Or Is There No Defense for Bill Belichick and the Patriots This Time?
https://www.boston.com/sports/columnists/wilbur/2015/01/deflategate_blame_it_on_the_rain_or_is_there_no_de.html

Deflategate: What NFL Players Are Saying About Patriots’ Controversy
https://www.foxsports.com/buzzer/story/deflategate-new-england-patriots-nfl-player-reaction-012115

Time for Patriots to Embrace Deflategate, Hate
https://www.boston.com/sports/blogs/obnoxiousbostonfan/2015/01/time_for_patriots_to_embrace_deflategate_hate.html

 

 

Making Changes in the NFL:

 

**UPDATED**

 

NFL Owner Admits League’s New Domestic Violence Policy Is A Public Relations Ploy
https://thinkprogress.org/sports/2014/12/10/3602006/nfl-owner-admits-leagues-new-personal-conduct-policy-is-a-public-relations-ploy/

Angry NFL Fans Flock to Product
https://thepioneeronline.com/23456/opinions/angry-nfl-fans-flock-to-product/

Drew Brees Questions NFL’s Knee-Jerk Policy Changes and Fear of PR Hits
https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2287198-drew-brees-questions-nfls-knee-jerk-policy-changes-and-fear-of-pr-hit

Roger Goodell Shows He Hasn’t Changed With New Personal Conduct Policy
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/sports/wp/2014/12/11/roger-goodell-shows-he-hasnt-changed-with-new-personal-conduct-policy/

NFLPA Criticizes “Unilateral” Imposition of Personal Conduct Policy
https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2014/12/10/nflpa-criticizes-unilateral-imposition-of-personal-conduct-policy/

TEXAS VIEW: Goodell Must Go for NFL to Move Ahead
https://www.oaoa.com/editorial/views/texas_opinion/article_3c53f2e2-7efe-11e4-8de2-53f55814b250.html

Why So Serious, Roger Goodell?
https://time.com/3628892/roger-goodell/

 

The Crisis Escalates:

 

NFL in Crisis – A Lack of Leadership in Raising Star Athletes

https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnkotter/2014/09/29/nfl-in-crisis-a-lack-of-leadership-in-raising-star-athletes/

WATCH: NFL Crisis Mocked In Saturday Night Live Cold Open

https://www.gossipcop.com/nfl-crisis-snl-cold-open-video-saturday-night-live-watch-roger-goodell-chris-pratt/

NFL Executives Insist Roger Goodell’s Job is Safe Despite Crisis, Chaos

https://bills.buffalonews.com/2014/09/19/nfl-executives-insist-roger-goodells-job-safe-despite-crisis-chaos

Jameis Winston Suspension Increased By Florida State After Vulgar, Misogynistic Outburst

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/20/jameis-winston-suspended-florida-state_n_5854720.html

Roger Goodell Press Conference: ‘I Got It Wrong’ about Ray Rice Domestic Violence Incident

Hundreds of Baltimore Ravens Fans Form HALF-MILE Long Line to Swap Their Ray Rice Jerseys
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2762543/Hundreds-Baltimore-fans-form-queue-stretching-half-mile-swap-Ray-Rice-jersey-stars-club-desperately-tries-claw-public-opinion.html

White House: NFL Needs ‘To Get A Handle On’ Domestic Violence Issues
https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/eye-on-football/24715785/white-house-nfl-needs-to-get-a-handle-on-domestic-violence-issues

Assault Charges Add to N.F.L.’s Off-Field Turmoil
https://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/18/sports/football/nfl.html NFL Crises

Adrian Peterson Crisis Threatens NFL’s Lifeblood
https://www.thestar.com/sports/football/2014/09/16/adrian_peterson_crisis_threatens_nfls_lifeblood_arthur.html

Adrian Peterson Child Abuse Case Is Latest NFL Crisis
https://blogs.houstonpress.com/news/2014/09/adrian_peterson_child_abuse_case_is_latest_nfl_crisis.php

Cris Carter In Tears: Adrian Peterson Mustn’t Play After Child Abuse
https://hollywoodlife.com/2014/09/15/cris-carter-adrian-peterson-espn-anchor-cries/

NFL’s Next Ray Rice Crisis is Already Here with Greg Hardy, Panthers
https://sports.yahoo.com/news/nfl-s-next-ray-rice-crisis-is-already-here-with-greg-hardy–panthers-033425803.html

Greg Hardy Inactive for Panthers Against Lions, Defensive Lineman Found Guilty of Domestic Assault Will Still Be Paid
https://www.nydailynews.com/sports/football/panthers-deactivate-greg-hardy-nfl-domestic-abuse-crisis-continues-article-1.1939138

If There Were a Greg Hardy Video…
https://www.si.com/nfl/2014/09/12/greg-hardy-carolina-panthers-domestic-abuse
Jonathan Dwyer Arrested, Deactivated
https://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/11544985/jonathan-dwyer-arizona-cardinals-arrested-two-counts-suspicion-aggravated-assault?ex_cid=sportscenterFB

 

 

 

 

The League and it’s Leaders…

 

 

*UPDATED*

Packers CEO Mark Murphy Talks About Current NFL Crisis

NFL Crisis Could Hinder Growth of Female Fan Base
https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/nfl/2014/09/15/female-nfl-fans-c-keith-harrison-ann-bastianelli-marie-claire/15697247/Budweiser to NFL: Fix Your Domestic Abuse Problem. Now.
https://mashable.com/2014/09/16/nfl-sponsors/Misogyny and Homophobia in the NFL: Is America’s Crisis of Masculinity Playing Out in Its Favorite Sport?
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/michelangelo-signorile/nfl-misogyny-homophobia_b_5828874.htmlSportswriter Mike Lupica on NFL’s PR Crisis: Credibility of the League is Suffering
https://www.today.com/news/sportswriter-mike-lupica-nfls-pr-crisis-credibility-league-suffering-1D80157858Ad Review: NFL PR Effort Is as Laughable as Its Morals
https://adage.com/article/ad-review/ad-review-nfl-pr-effort-laughable-morals/294967/Game Day Reports: Off-the-Field Violence
https://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/16/sports/football/nfl-commentators-share-insights-on-ray-rice-and-adrian-peterson.html?_r=0
NFL Bungles Crisis Management in Ray Rice Case
The Management Style Of The NFL Has Turned Into A Grease Fire
https://www.forbes.com/sites/maurybrown/2014/09/16/the-management-style-of-the-nfl-has-turned-into-a-grease-fire/Breaking Bad: The Economics, Sociology, And Psychology Of Law-Breaking Behavior By NFL Players
https://www.forbes.com/sites/prishe/2014/09/17/breaking-bad-the-economics-sociology-and-psychology-of-law-breaking-behavior-by-nfl-players/Silence on Peterson Could Hurt Commissioner More than Rice Case
https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2014/09/17/silence-on-peterson-could-hurt-commissioner-more-than-rice-case/The NFL Scandal Shows Why You Shouldn’t Get Your News from the PR Dept.
https://www.latimes.com/business/hiltzik/la-fi-mh-the-nfl-scandal-20140916-column.htmlWill The Elite NFL Media Still Be Stooges After The Ray Rice Scandal?
https://deadspin.com/will-the-elite-nfl-media-still-be-stooges-after-the-ray-1633884608?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+deadspin%2Fexcerpts+(Deadspin+Excerpts)NFL Brand Takes a Battering But Remains ‘Unbreakable’: Experts
https://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/nfl-controversy/nfl-brand-tarnished-remains-unbreakable-experts-n203951

The NFL is Scrambling for Some Good-News Daylight Like a Frantic Quarterback
https://www.mynextfone.co.uk/storyline/the-nfl-is-scrambling-for-some-goodnews-daylight-like-a-h26225.html



5 Strategies Guaranteed to Make 2016 the Best Year Ever

Leslie-Grossman-featured-newBy Leslie Grossman, Chair, Vistage International

How was 2015 for you?  Great year?  Could have been better?  No matter whether you want more or less of what you got last year, here are 5 strategies that can lead to great results if you practice them relentlessly.   No need for New Year’s Resolutions, when you move into action on 5  Strategies Guaranteed to Make 2016 the Best Year Everthese. The key is to have someone hold you accountable.

  1.  Identify Your Four (4) Goals for 2016. Choose two personal goals which will make you a happier person. The other two goals are business goals, which when achieved will positively impact your career or your enterprise. Follow Dr. Ron Smith’s ABCs of goal setting – make them AchievableBelievable, and Commit yourself to work on them.
  1.  Find your Purpose.Why are you on this planet? According to Shawn Murphy of The Switch and Shift Change Playbook, your purpose is “the perfect intersection between ‘what you love doing’, ‘what you are great at’, ‘what the world needs’ and ‘what you are paid for’. Your purpose gets you up in the morning and keeps you working late…and it helps you achieve sustainable economic success.”
  1. Build your Entourage of Trusted Advisors. Most of us spend a lot of time on social media. Commit to reduce your time online and spend more time meeting face-to-face with influencers.  Join or create a group of peers who are respected and successful.  (Yes, it can be a Vistage CEO or Trusted Advisor group, like those I chair or ‘do it yourself’. Just do it.) Leaders are not successful alone or living in the virtual world. They have real-life trusted advisors and collaborators around them.  Make it your first priority to support trusted advisors with thoughtful insights, your own experiences, introductions and collaborations. Don’t expect anything in return. After giving generously, it’s your turn to ask for support.  If you don’t get anything from the group, it may be because you haven’t made specific requests or haven’t proven yourself ‘trust-worthy’ Trusted relationships are a critical component of achieving your goals.
  1.  Think and Feel Abundance. Live your life with an abundant mentality, not a scarcity mindset, regardless of your financial situation.  Create a personal culture of curiosity, generosity and caring about others.  It’s clear from the experiences of successful people, that what ever we put out to the universe is what we get back.  If you focus on not having enough, that’s what comes back. When you focus on gratitude for what you have, you get more of what you want.  With an abundance mindset we see opportunities and new chances, rather than fear, anxiety and desperation.  Watch the new film, JOY, to see both in action. You’ve heard it before, but probably didn’t do it: Write down 1 or 2 things you’re grateful for every night before you go to sleep.  Sweet dreams. Expect the best!
  1. Listen More and Talk Less. We are a nation of talkers – talk shows, politicians, pundits, professors and know-it alls.  The most under-used communication skill is listening. The easiest way to become a good listener is to put your natural curiosity to work. Learn to ask great questions to your customers and your team. Questioning will help you discover what your customers want from your company. Show you care by asking your employees questions instead of telling them how to do it better. You may be surprised when they become more engaged and more productive. Use questioning to keep millennials working effectively and staying longer. Your team will perform better, because when you listen you are a better leader.  Remember without a great coach, even the most skilled players won’t win the Super Bowl.

About the Author:  Leslie Grossman, author of “LINK OUT: How to Turn Your Network into a Chain of Lasting Connections” (Wiley), is a Vistage International Chair in New York City.  She was CEO of Communications/Marketing Action and Women’s Leadership Exchange and is a leadership and business development strategist, speaker and coach at Leslie Grossman Leadership.   Leslie can be reached at leslie@lesliegrossmanleadership.com. 




Creating a Joyful Planet – Featuring Judith Harrison

Patrice Tanaka Founder & Chief Joy Officer of Joyful Planet LLC

Patrice Tanaka
Founder & Chief Joy Officer
Joyful Planet LLC

Patrice Tanaka, Founder & Chief Joy Officer of Joyful Planet LLC, interviews people who are actively living their purpose and contributing to a more joyful planet. This interview spotlights Judith Harrison, Senior Vice President, Staffing and Diversity & Inclusion at Weber Shandwick.

PT:  Judith, I know you to be a very purpose-driven individual. That’s what I admire and adore about you. Can you share your life’s purpose with us?  I define a life’s purpose as one that leverages your greatest talent and passion in service of people and planet.

Thanks so much, Patrice. Opening doors and driving the advancement of women and people of color is my life’s purpose. It’s what I was born to do.

PT:  How, when and why did you set out to discover your life’s purpose? Was there a triggering incident?

JH:  I didn’t set out to find it; my purpose pretty much found me. It was there all along, but I was too busy or perhaps just not wise enough to see it.

There wasn’t a triggering incident. Rather, it was the sum of my life experiences and deeply held beliefs that led me here. I think of the movie, Slumdog Millionaire, in which the main character goes through a series of seemingly disparate and sometimes terrible experiences, only to have them come together in the end to provide him with the right answers for India’s version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? Fortunately, my life hasn’t been nearly as dramatic, but there were enough formative experiences to lead me to this place.

I grew up in New York, watching the civil rights movement in the south play out on TV. Churches were bombed, people trying to exercise their right to vote were attacked with fire hoses and the National Guard had to be called in to protect children who were simply trying to get an education. I was well aware that had I been born elsewhere, one of those terrified children shown walking to school could have been me. I came of age in the 70s, when Gloria Steinem created Ms. Magazine, giving voice to a problem I had never articulated, but felt to my core.

I’ve had challenging experiences in my career, including working at a multinational firm where the HR manager had a Confederate flag the size of Montana on her wall. And after years of watching society move way too slowly, if not backward, on true equality for women  and people of color, and watching our industry move way too slowly on becoming as diverse as the stakeholders we serve, my purpose became crystal clear: I had to do everything in my power to drive the change I wanted to see.

PT:  And once you determined your purpose did you find yourself begin to actively live it?  How did you begin? What did you do?

Judith Harrison Senior Vice President, Staffing and Diversity & Inclusion at Weber Shandwick.

Judith Harrison
Senior Vice President, Staffing and Diversity & Inclusion at Weber Shandwick.

JH:  I started to live it in some ways before I realized what it was. I had always supported organizations aligned with my beliefs and found myself becoming more active in them shortly before I identified my purpose. I joined the board of New York Women in Communications, whose mission is to empower women in all communications disciplines at all stages of their careers to reach their full potential. I had always advocated and worked to hire people of color and women, especially at the executive level. I started cataloging diversity and inclusion best practices and speaking with D&I leaders from companies that were ahead of mine on the diversity journey, then started writing long memos to my manager about what we should be doing to create a more diverse and inclusive environment. And almost before I knew it, I was in a new role that was created for me to do the things I had been writing and speaking about so passionately.

PT:  How do you live this purpose in your personal and professional life today?

JH:  My purpose is the center of my personal and professional life. To increase diversity across the PR industry, I conceptualized the Diversity Distinction in PR Awards, presented it to the PR Council and worked with them to develop the program, which is heading into its sixth year.  As Weber Shandwick’s diversity and inclusion leader, I drive programs designed to build a diverse workforce that leverages different backgrounds to bring the innovative thinking and creativity clients expect, and maintain an inspiring, high-performance workplace that fosters collaboration and attracts the best minds in the business. I recently ended my term as president of New York Women in Communications Foundation, which provides scholarships, internships and mentoring to young women entering the communications business, and I remain an active executive committee member of the organization. I’m vice president of PRSA Foundation, which is dedicated to increasing diversity in the PR industry. Last year I brought the United Negro College Fund together with the PR industry under the auspices of the Foundation to create the PRIME (Public Relations Internship, Mentoring and Education) Program, which was piloted in Atlanta last summer with 15 sponsors, including Coca-Cola, Johnson & Johnson and other Fortune 500 companies, as well as leading PR agencies. We will expand the program in 2016 and will replicate it with an organization focusing on Hispanic students. I’m on the advisory board of the Ron Brown Scholar Program, which provides scholarships, mentoring and leadership opportunities for African American students of outstanding promise.

I mentor and speak to young women and people of color about embracing the opportunities and preparing for the challenges that may lie ahead. Most recently, I addressed Georgetown University Women of Color, which seeks to support and encourage the leadership of women.

I’m also working to change perceptions and increase opportunities for other underrepresented groups. I recently joined the Clinton Global Initiative Disability working Group, which is exploring and codifying best practices for bringing people with disabilities into the workplace, with a special emphasis on the entertainment and media-related industries.

PT:  What is the result of knowing and actively living your life’s purpose?

Judith Harrison presenting at the 2015 Matrix Awards (New York City)

 JH: Living my purpose has enabled me to activate agency and industry-wide diversity and inclusion efforts. It has given me the great joy of helping people who otherwise might not have had the opportunities they’ve been offered or the tools to pursue their dreams. It has opened doors for me in completely unexpected ways. Once I identified and stood in my truth, everything changed: my job, the organizations and people I had access to and my ability to influence. Opportunities to impact the lives of populations still fighting for their place at the table came serendipitously.

 PT: What is your biggest dream and vision for the life purpose you have chosen?

 JH: That someday my purpose will be obsolete. I have woven the threads of my most deeply held beliefs and my professional commitments into a fabric that gets stronger every day. I hope it will continue to level the playing field long after I’m gone.

 PT: What do you think you would be doing now if you hadn’t discovered and then actively begun to live your purpose?

 This is a tough question because I’m so invested in what I do now, I can’t imagine being this engaged doing anything else. I was an HR and recruiting leader for many years before I began to live my purpose, so it’s likely that I would be doing something along those lines. But, as we know, life is full of surprises.

PT:  How important is it for people to discover their life purpose?

JH:  It makes all the difference in the world. Because I know what my purpose is, I am inspired and driven every day to make sure my actions serve to further it. Knowing one’s purpose is critical in so many ways. It taps into a person’s strengths, aligns their work with their values and makes them part of something much bigger than themselves. It increases joy, deepens connections with others and gives them the satisfaction of doing their part, no matter how small, to change the world.

 

 

 

 About the Author:   Patrice Tanaka is a serial entrepreneur, having co-founded three award-winning, PR & marketing firms and, most recently, Joyful Planet, a Business & Life Strategy Consultancy.  “Through Joyful Planet, I am doing what I love and what I do best, leveraging my creative, problem-solving talent to help individuals and organizations discover and live their purpose and move forward more successfully and joyfully in business and life,” says Patrice.  This is the subject of Patrice’s upcoming book, Beat the Curve, co-authored with world renowned management consultant and coach, Brian Tracy, and other business leaders.  Her chapter is entitled, “Live Your Life’s Purpose and Unleash Your Joy.”  Connect with Patrice@JoyfulPlanet.com 

 




Most Mentioned Issues in the Australian Media – 2015

Most Mentioned Issues in the Australian Media -2015Editor’s Note:  Welcome to this 2015 recap of Australia’s news, powered by iSentia

Australia’s involvement in the conflict in Syria and Iraq increased this year, starting with claims that up to 400 Australians were fighting with Daesh terrorists in the Middle East or actively supporting them from home. The first attack in Paris at the Charlie Hebdo office was followed by former PM Tony Abbott announcing Australia would assist the US with air strikes in Iraq and Syria. National security became a hot topic in local media as the Federal Government announced new laws to ctrack potential jihadists, including storing metadata for up to two years, and police raids revealed an alleged ANZAC Day terrorist plot in Melbourne. Europe tried to cope with hundreds of thousands of Syrians fleeing the war zone, and a second, larger coordinated Daesh attack in Paris in November, as the conflict entered its eighth year with no end in sight.

Following the unpopular 2014 budget, leadership pressure significantly rose on Tony Abbott when he gave Prince Philip a knighthood, leading to a surprising attempted leadership spill in February with 40% of the party room voting for the spill, despite there being no declared challenger, with much media reporting that Abbott was given six months to improve, with considerable focus on his Chief of Staff, Peta Credlin. In September, with the government still well behind in the polls and Bill Shorten neck-and-neck as preferred Prime Minister, Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull challenged and won the party room vote to become Australia’s fifth prime minister in five years.

After a series of criminal trials in 2006 following their arrest for drug smuggling as part of the Bali Nine, Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran were sentenced to execution by firing squad by the Denpasar District Court in Indonesia, with an appeal dismissed in 2011 and pleas for clemency rejected by the President of Indonesia, Joko Widodo, on 22 January this year and the two men were killed by firing squad on 29 April. The Australian Federal Police was criticised for informing Indonesian authorities about the drug syndicate’s plans rather than arresting them in Australia.

Domestic violence survivor Rosie Batty was named Australian of the Year, with then PM Tony Abbott announcing she would also sit on a Council of Australian Government Panel on family violence, to help implement a national domestic violence order scheme. In March, the government announced $230 million towards the scheme, and a series of domestic violence-related murders received extensive media coverage throughout the year. Organisation Destroy the Joint says 78 women in Australia have lost their lives to domestic violence this year.

The 2015 Cricket World Cup was hosted by Australia and New Zealand in February and March, and after seven weeks of cricket those were the two teams left standing in the final, with England crashing out to Bangladesh in the preliminary stage and early favourites South Africa and India going down in the semi-finals. In captain Michael Clarke’s international swansong, the Australians dominated the final, bowling out the black caps for 183 and getting the runs with more than 15 overs to spare to win their fifth World Cup.

Australia's Most Mentioned Issues in the Media - 2015

Quote of the Year: “I want it to be a surprise for you” – Then Education Minister Christopher Pyne plays coy with Sky News’s David Speers in the soon to become infamous “I fixed it” interview.




Stressed? 5 Tips to Thrive in Business During December Stress

LeslieGrossmanLeadership2By Leslie Grossman, Chair, Vistage International, & Author, LINK OUT: How to Turn Your Network into a Chain of Lasting Connections 

5 Tips to Thrive in Business During December StressAs we enter the holiday period, many of us experience major stress. What do we worry about? Making the numbers, giving or getting bonuses, spending more time with our families and more. We all have our own concerns.

Here’s some stress-fighting tips that you can do right now to help you thrive in December and feel happy and calmer all year round.

1. Get Physical. Even if you don’t have time to get to the gym you can still activate your stress-fighting hormones. Walk to work or park far enough away from the office to get in a brisk walk before or after your day. Stop by a high school track on your drive to the train and do two rounds. Exercise is a powerful de-stresser. Find your own way to get some!
2. Play the Music. High-energy, motivational music uplifts us. Listen to your favorites from Bruno Mars to Pharrell, Queen to Barbara Streisand – play it on your phone, in your car, on your headphones and even while you work. Take a 5 minute music break. Music magically changes your mood and puts you in a more positive frame of mind. Like Patti LaBelle sings: “ I have a New Attitude”. Listen to her here.
3. Stop the All-nighters and Get at least Six hours of Sleep. You need your rest to deal with challenges you may be facing. We each have different sleep needs but we can’t go without it. If you have trouble going to sleep – try a natural hormone like Melatonin – available over the counter. (It’s always wise to check with your doctor first.)
4. Keep a Gratitude Diary. Before you go to sleep, make a list of at least two good things for which you are grateful. I like to jot down at least one good thing that happened at work and another one or two things for which I am grateful in my life. Focusing on the positive puts the emphasis on what REALLY matters and doing it repetitively each night or morning creates a positive mindset and reduces worry.
5. Do a 10 minute meditation. No need to know how to meditate. Just download a free app from Headspace or Calm. Five to 10 minutes is all you need. It’s fine if your mind wanders. Just bring it back to the voice on the app and you’ll feel better in a flash. Close your office door (if you have one) or go sit on a park bench or in your car. Take some deep breaths, look at nature, listen to the birds and look up at the clouds.

We all go through stress – it’s human nature. I’m writing this blog, because it helps me, too. Think back to when you’ve been through this before and how most everything worked out fine. Practice some of these tips, than play Gloria Gaynor’s theme song “I will survive” loud and strong. You will not only survive, you will most likely thrive. Happy December!

About the Author:  Leslie Grossman, author of “LINK OUT: How to Turn Your Network into a Chain of Lasting Connections” (Wiley), is a Vistage International Chair in New York City.  She was CEO of Communications/Marketing Action and Women’s Leadership Exchange and is a leadership and business development strategist, speaker and coach at Leslie Grossman Leadership.   Leslie can be reached at leslie@lesliegrossmanleadership.com.