O The Oprah Magazine At 20: Celebrating Hope And Bloom In The Midst Of Doom And Gloom

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The Mr. Magazine™ Interview…

A Virtual Round Table With O, The Oprah Magazine’s Senior Vice President/Publisher & Chief Revenue Officer, Jayne Jamison; Editor in Chief, Lucy Kaylin; & Digital Director, Arianna Davis…

“If you think about right now, how people need inspiration, for the times, it’s just amazing how this brand has morphed into what everybody is looking for. It’s not something that’s cookie cutter, you don’t have a lot of magazines out there that are competitors. O, The Oprah Magazine doesn’t really have a competitor. We’re not competitive with lifestyle magazines, certainly not Real Simple. We’re certainly not a women’s service magazine, so we have a very unique position and because of that it gives us an audience that’s not duplicative.” … Jayne Jamison

“There are learnings here, and that’s exciting. If this has taught us anything, we know now that we have to be agile and we have to be able to get by on very little sometimes. We can’t just assume that we’ll have the resources and the luxury, the incredible luxury, to all just sit around together and bang out ideas. We have to think in terms of new ways of working. And we have to always be adhering to our mission at O, which is to help women live their best lives, no matter what befalls them.” …Lucy Kaylin

“The lens that we look at everything through is whether or not this will inspire our reader or helping them with their best life. If it’s a celebrity news story, we still want to make sure that the story is told from a positive perspective. That there is a point beyond contributing to the celebrity news cycle. Or the flip side of that, really digging in and finding the reported story or the essay that’s going to move our reader or stay with her for a long time.” … Arianna Davis

I recently spoke with the team leaders over at O, The Oprah Magazine: Jayne Jamison (Senior Vice President/Publisher & Chief Revenue Officer), Lucy Kaylin (Editor in Chief), and Arianna Davis (Digital Director), and we talked about publishing during a pandemic, and not only publishing, but celebrating a milestone – the 20th anniversary issue. It was a remarkable round table discussion held virtually, of course, but with true hope, inspiration and honesty.One thing I know for sure is that O, The Oprah Magazine, with no competition in the marketplace, has been spreading the “you can do it” message for 20 years strong now. Even in the midst of this pandemic, the message of the magazine and its namesake is still the same: “Live Your Best Life.” Oprah Winfrey is such a positive force in the world today and her magazine is just as upbeat and hopeful. During a pandemic, Oprah’s message and that of the magazine’s has never been needed more. And on top of everything else, this is the 20th anniversary of O, the Oprah Magazine. I was lucky enough  to be at the O, The Oprah Magazine launch party 20 years ago, where I received a boxed copy of the magazine signed by her. What an amazing event and gift!

So, please enjoy the 16th Mr. Magazine™ interview in the series of Publishing During A Pandemic with Jayne, Lucy & Arianna as they celebrate 20 years of Oprah and Live Our Best Lives, even during a pandemic.

But first the sound-bites:

On operating during a pandemic (Jayne Jamison): We’re trying to engage where we can. There are some clients who have put their ad plans on pause; there are clients who are moving forward and are highly engaged with us, so it really depends on the category of business that we’re talking about. CPG (Consumer Packaged Goods) people are very active and interested.

On how she is ensuring that the magazine is relevant, needed and sufficient in today’s uncertain times (Lucy  Kaylin): I think it’s more relevant than ever. This is not a time to put your head under the pillow or allow yourself to be paralyzed with fear. We are all about the connection in its various forms. One of the things that we’re finding as we endure this surreal circumstance is that we are desperate to connect. And that even means connecting in our way with people on the other side of the world. We have an enhanced sense of people everywhere going through what we’re going through and we care a lot.

On the impact of the pandemic on the website (Arianna Davis): The lens that we look at everything through is whether or not this will inspire our reader or helping them with their best life. If it’s a celebrity news story, we still want to make sure that the story is told from a positive perspective. That there is a point beyond contributing to the celebrity news cycle. Or the flip side of that, really digging in and finding the reported story or the essay that’s going to move our reader or stay with her for a long time.

On what we will find in the 20th anniversary issue (Jayne Jamison): First, we did a really cool inkjetting on the front cover with our partner Olay, and like many of the partners of Oprah Magazine, they have been with us since the beginning. We started with a personalized message from Oprah, which is inkjetted in our Oprah font, her handwriting, so 500,000 subscribers received a personalized cover with an inkjetted message from Oprah. Then you open it up to consistent spreads, for Olay’s spacing, of some of our most iconic covers that we’ve had in the last 20 years, including the one of Oprah wearing a 3.5 pound wig that won an ASME award for the magazine a number of years ago. It’s a really amazing high-impact unit with this custom personalization on the cover.

On where she sees things heading after the pandemic is behind us (Lucy Kaylin): That’s a good question. I feel like we’re going to have to see when this fog dissipates and then try to tell where we are, because one thing I think this has done for us is force us to work in a new way, but it has also encouraged us to think in a new way. To think about what are some of the things, the practices, maybe even the crutches, that we’ve used over the years that we really don’t need.

On what the 20th anniversary digital counterpart will look like (Arianna Davis): Much of the content from the 20th anniversary issue will be going online and there will be an oral history of the magazine and how it came to be and how the magazine has progressed through the years. It’s a really delightful story that I think readers will love that we’re going to do online in a big way.

And now for the lightly edited transcript of the Mr. Magazine™ interview with Senior Vice President/Publisher & Chief Revenue Officer, Jayne Jamison; Editor in Chief, Lucy Kaylin; & Digital Director, Arianna Davis, O, The Oprah Magazine.

Jayne Jamison

Up first Jayne Jamison:

Samir Husni: How are you operating during this pandemic?

Jayne Jamison: We’re trying to engage where we can. There are some clients who have put their ad plans on pause; there are clients who are moving forward and are highly engaged with us, so it really depends on the category of business that we’re talking about. CPG (Consumer Packaged Goods) people are very active and interested.

Obviously, retailers who have furloughed their employees and aren’t opened, even if they have ecommerce, it’s a little more difficult. But we have armed the staff with tons of ideas and we’re doing it through Zoom calls, Webex and Zoom, we’re doing a lot of video calls with our clients, because for us, we’ve always been in a high-touch business, so it’s really hard just to be emailing back and forth without seeing your client’s face and being able to present the concept yourself. So, we’re doing it a lot and it’s working really well, actually, except maybe for my dog barking in the background or a screaming child occasionally. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: How easy or difficult was the move to working from home for you?

Jayne Jamison: For me, I think it depends on each person and their digital savvy. Some people have a few more issues than others, but if you have a good connection and there are no problems with Internet, it’s a pretty easy system to learn and everybody really got up to speed quickly. Before we left we gave everybody a tutorial and on how to use Webex and Zoom. Many of our clients were already using them, especially those who have offices all over the world. So, we got used to it and used to it very quickly. I prefer to be in front of someone, but because we can’t it’s the next best thing really.

Samir Husni: As the chief revenue officer of a magazine that’s celebrating 20 years, and not just any magazine, but O, The Oprah Magazine, what’s your plan going forward? You have the 20th anniversary issue, and I assume everything inside it took place before the pandemic hit us, so what’s next?

Jayne Jamison: We actually closed the first week in March, so our timing was impeccable on that. Moving forward, it’s hard to say. It all depends on when we are out of the isolation mode, because right now I think a lot of advertisers are waiting for their stores to reopen to spend again. So, we don’t really know.

We’re working on things like the summer issues, but we don’t know when we’re going back to work. It’s a hard situation because there is no answer right now, everybody would love to have one, but we don’t. And we’re based in New York, so we’re in the epicenter of this problem. We live in a very high-density area, we have to know that there is going to be testing so that everyone can get back to work.

Samir Husni: What will we find in this 20th anniversary issue of O, The Oprah Magazine?

Jayne Jamison: For our brand, it’s all about the engagement. Oprah’s fans are really excited about everything she does. For us, this idea of personal growth is important. When you think about Oprah launching this magazine 20 years ago, it was about mindfulness, the mind/body connection, and about elevating your lives and positive mental health; all of these things are really in the forefront now. And also being the most diverse general market magazine in America and the fact that we’ve always had diverse voices. And not just ethnicity, we’re talking about age, sexual orientation, and body shape and size. So, in terms of what America looks like and what America is interested in, this idea of connecting with other human beings, obviously at this moment, that’s hard, but we’ve always been about how to create stronger connections in your life, whether it’s with your family, your work associates, or globally.

The people who read this magazine are lifelong learners and they’re very interested in learning about others, people who are different than them, and Oprah is so great about finding the commonalities among people. It’s just been a joy because this is a brand that whatever we do, if we have a custom collaboration with Talbots and we’re trying to drive people into the store, or if it’s Amazon we’re working with, everyone looks to Oprah, she’s the arbiter of taste and she’s the person we go to for inspiration.

And if you think about right now, how people need inspiration, for the times, it’s just amazing how this brand has morphed into what everybody is looking for. It’s not something that’s cookie cutter, you don’t have a lot of magazines out there that are competitors. O, The Oprah Magazine doesn’t really have a competitor. We’re not competitive with lifestyle magazines, certainly not Real Simple. We’re certainly not a women’s service magazine, so we have a very unique position and because of that it gives us an audience that’s not duplicative.

Samir Husni: Give me three unique things that you feel you’ve achieved with the 20th anniversary issue.

Jayne Jamison: First, we did a really cool inkjetting on the front cover with our partner Olay, and like many of the partners of Oprah Magazine, they have been with us since the beginning. We started with a personalized message from Oprah, which is inkjetted in our Oprah font, her handwriting, so 500,000 subscribers received a personalized cover with an inkjetted message from Oprah. Then you open it up to consistent spreads, for Olay’s spacing, of some of our most iconic covers that we’ve had in the last 20 years, including the one of Oprah wearing a 3.5 pound wig that won an ASME award for the magazine a number of years ago. It’s a really amazing high-impact unit with this custom personalization on the cover.

And what we did on the back cover was with Hallmark. They’re doing a really big digital campaign with us, which is actually launching very soon, and it’s all about connection, which is very timely right now; we actually polybagged a greeting card in the issue. It went specifically to millennial readers, our millennial readership has grown significantly because Oprah obviously resonates a lot with millennials. So we did a card that was all about connection and how you could celebrate Mother’s Day if you’re not with your mother physically. These reader’s will get a card to send to their mothers and it’s going to 100,000 subscribers that the client chose, in addition to running an ad on our third cover and having the big digital campaign.

We also have various clients who basically ran ads thanking us for the partnership that we’ve had. There are fashion brands like Bionic Shoes, Lane Bryant, people we have credited throughout the years continuously, and they all ran really nice ads congratulating us and touting the credits that they’ve had in our magazine. So that was really nice too.

There’s a lot of really great advertising and content in it. It’s our biggest issue of the year thus far. We had about 66 pages of advertising within the issue, so we had many new advertisers too. But I would say the thank you ads, such as with our partner Holland America, we have a cruise partnership, they took out a spread to thank us for that partnership, those were just so nice because we have a lot of synergy and very deep relationships with many of our core clients.

Samir Husni: What is your message to your readers, clients and employees during these uncertain times?

Jayne Jamison:  My message is one of resilience. Every day we have to get up and say this is a new day, we’re going to try again. We’re going to come up with another new idea; we’re going to get one client on the phone that we haven’t been able to connect with.

If you’re in this industry, overtime you’ve built up, obviously, a sense of resilience, but this is a lot different, because you have people working from home. So, for me, it’s find the time, and I don’t care when you do it. Some of my staff have children at home and they’re homeschooling, so it’s a matter of trying to balance all the things in their lives. If today is a bad day, we can get to it tomorrow, but I think that resilience is what makes a good salesperson a great salesperson. You never take no for an answer, you always go back and find another option or another idea that’s going to get your clients excited because it’s going to help them grow their business.

Samir Husni: Anything you’d like to add?

Jayne Jamison: One thing I do want to tell you very badly is my husband is from Memphis, Tenn. and one way I can get my children to Zoom with me is send them food, so we are having Rendezvous BBQ tonight. My kids are all over the place, but everyone got their Rendezvous last night and we’re going to eat together tonight via Zoom. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Jayne Jamison: The question is when can I get in front of my clients again, face to face. It is a high-touch business and it always has been. That’s really what we’re all craving for, not just obviously clients, but also to be with our staff face to face. You can communicate nicely through a computer, but we’re all wondering when can we go back. Will it be this month or next month, the summer? There are so many unanswered questions and we all want to plan the future, but right now we can’t.

Samir Husni: Thank you.

Lucy Kaylin

Up Next Lucy Kaylin:

Samir Husni: When I look back and reflect on the first issue of O, The Oprah Magazine from May/June 2000, Oprah’s call to action was “Live your best life,” “Have courage for the next 31 days.” Twenty years later, after showing people how to live their best life, what’s the message today during this pandemic?

Lucy Kaylin: To be honest, we’re the perfect companion for something like this. It would be wonderful to avoid anything like this pandemic ever again, but since we find ourselves in this position, we’re the magazine that’s truly there for you in good times and bad. We are very much dedicated to the idea that you really have everything you need inside yourself, in a sense. You have strength that you didn’t realize that you had; you have powers of expression, exploration and imagination.

And of course, connecting will now be happening over Zoom and Webex and on the phone, and all the rest, but you still have the power in you to reach out and connect, to comfort and to bring joy to yourself and others again, in good times and bad. That’s really what we counsel all the time, it’s not about the external things, at the end of the day it’s not about what you can buy, even though we do show lovely things that you can buy in the magazine should you want to, but that’s not where the lasting joy is going to come from.

Going through what we’re going through now, we’re just eager and delighted to be providing yet more of that inspiration and counsel. And also great ideas that we can share with readers on how to make even a time like this a rich and fulfilling one, where you ultimately find out new things about yourself.

Samir Husni: How are you ensuring that the magazine is relevant, needed and sufficient in today’s uncertain times?

Lucy Kaylin: For the reasons I just said, I think it’s more relevant than ever. This is not a time to put your head under the pillow or allow yourself to be paralyzed with fear. We are all about the connection in its various forms. One of the things that we’re finding as we endure this surreal circumstance is that we are desperate to connect. And that even means connecting in our way with people on the other side of the world. We have an enhanced sense of people everywhere going through what we’re going through and we care a lot.

And it’s the kind of thing that we are very focused on at O, The Oprah Magazine. We are always finding ways to shine our light and to use ourselves in ways that will be, not only joyful for us, but helpful for others. We need it now more than ever, so I think the relevance is rather acute at the moment.

Samir Husni: There was a quote you made once that Oprah taught you not to overthink or do something just to check it off your list. How are you handling that to-do list with your team during this pandemic?

Lucy Kaylin: Thank goodness for the apps, the technology that we all have to make that happen. The first few days were really harry, where we were just kind of scrambling, shooting off emails like crazy, with me getting messages to the team and delivering edits that way, which was a very cumbersome way to work. Soon enough, of course, we’re all up on Slack and we have the opportunity to see each other and we have the opportunity through Slack to look at pages together, look at layouts together, and we all talk and share and brainstorm almost as if we’re in the office together at the Hearst Tower.

We’re also planning some ways to be social together. One of the things that I’ve been doing is check-ins with small teams because it’s sort of hard to do with 35 people, but I just had a check-in with my copy and research department on Slack and I’m having a check-in with the fashion department, with the books department and a check-in with the beauty department, etc. So, it’s a way to at least maintain some personal contact with my wonderful staffers and just stay in touch.

We have a tradition of something called an “Obar,” which is when we close an issue or there’s something to celebrate, we break open some wine and have some cheese, we just have a really fun time at the office just being together. Obviously, we can’t do it quite the same way this time, but we’re going to have a Zoom Obar next week which I’m excited about. There is going to be some fun and games that will help us feel like we’re together.

Samir Husni: The 20th anniversary issue is themed “Visionaries,” and you’ve been with the magazine now for over a decade; did you ever imagine anything like this happening, that you would be publishing during a pandemic?

Lucy Kaylin: No, I certainly never imagined it. It blows my mind every time I think about it, that this isn’t just some terrible thing that New York City is going through, it’s happening all over the world. Obviously, it has just compromised business on all levels in the worst ways. And even though that’s terrible, I’m quick to be grateful for everything I have to be thankful for and all of us at Hearst are more grateful than we could possibly say, that we have our jobs through this. And that the company has been really quite wonderful in terms of putting the employees first through this terrible circumstance.

Samir Husni: What’s Oprah’s and your message through the pages of the magazine during this pandemic?

Lucy Kaylin: You know Samir, I do not write a letter from the editor, that’s Oprah’s role and Oprah definitely writes for the magazine, she’s very of-the-moment and exceedingly aware, concerned and compassionate in regards to whatever the world is going through. And that’s reflected in what she’s writing.

In fact, I was just proofing a “Here We Go” section and we added a box underneath the picture this month that is a shout-out to the photo team that pulled off some stories this month under unbelievable circumstances. For instance, we had the fabulous team of  Gentl and Hyers doing a food story and they made the food themselves, they shot it themselves in a very different and strict-down way. And the people who did the fashion story, I think the photographer’s girlfriend was the model and she did her own hair and makeup. People are finding incredibly creative ways to get this work done. And we make sure that our readers know what went into it, who came up with great ideas and sacrificed to bring them the content they love.

Samir Husni: As you move forward, what do you think is next? Try to look into your crystal ball, through the fog and tell me what you see.

Lucy Kaylin: That’s a good question. I feel like we’re going to have to see when this fog dissipates and then try to tell where we are, because one thing I think this has done for us is force us to work in a new way, but it has also encouraged us to think in a new way. To think about what are some of the things, the practices, maybe even the crutches, that we’ve used over the years that we really don’t need. For instance, does the entire team need to be joined at the hip, Monday through Friday, all day, every day, to put out this magazine. Is there something creative we can do, a sort of rotating cast of people on the premises and then some remote, just that sort of thing.

There are learnings here, and that’s exciting. If this has taught us anything, we know now that we have to be agile and we have to be able to get by on very little sometimes. We can’t just assume that we’ll have the resources and the luxury, the incredible luxury, to all just sit around together and bang out ideas. We have to think in terms of new ways of working. And we have to always be adhering to our mission at O, which is to help women live their best lives, no matter what befalls them. Sometimes it’s personal tragedy and difficult circumstances in one’s own life and sometimes it’s something like this. Our mission is vast and ongoing and we’re proud to be of service with that mission.

Samir Husni: Any additional words of wisdom?

Lucy Kaylin: Just be kind to each other, connect in every way you possibly can, and also know that lovingly-made media, along the lines of monthly magazines like O, are a great way to foster a connection. You can reconnect with you and you can connect through what you’re learning in O and what inspires you in O and share it with others.

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Lucy Kaylin: Aside from a global pandemic? And a completely ravaged stock market and the fact that both of my kids are on the West Coast; what’s keeping me up at night? It’s really just my normal insomnia, Samir. Even in good times I’m up a few hours in the middle of every night. I’m choosing to be grateful for the opportunity to use those hours for reflection, because we live in a world where that is required to maintain your equilibrium. We really need to hunker down and reflect. And whether that’s at 3:30 in the morning or on a lazy Sunday, it’s something I strongly encourage.

Samir Husni: Thank you.

Arianna Davis

And last, but certainly not least, Arianna Davis:

Samir Husni: In the midst of this pandemic, what role is oprahmag.com playing today in spreading Oprah’s message and the magazine as a whole?

Arianna Davis: There has always been an online presence in some way or another for the magazine. For a long time there was oprah.com, which was a bit more of a marketing site for things happening in Oprah’s world. There was some coverage of the magazine, but it wasn’t its own editorial site. So, in 2018 Hearst decided it was the right time. It was coming on the heels of Oprah’s infamous Golden Globe speech where she inspired a lot of hope in people and talked about the Me Too movement. It was really an inspirational moment. And the magazine was so successful, I think Hearst decided it was time that the magazine have its own editorial website.

We launched in October 2018. The magazine has been around so long and is incredibly rich with the kind of stories you really want to sit down and spend your time with. The online edition is more of what’s happening right now, looking through the lens of living your best life, while the print magazine is an inspirational tool for what you may want to do later with the sense of Oprah’s positivity.

There are a few things that we’re able to do online that the magazine may not gear as much toward, which is news stories, even some celebrity content, but also most of the great content from the magazine goes online. We also do a lot of personal essays, the same kind of inspirational, riveting content that you’ll see in the magazine. It’s definitely the same ecosystem as the print magazine, we’re just able to do things a bit more timely since we can get a story up on the same day.

Samir Husni: Has it been easier or harder to do the digital when you’re isolating and social distancing from your team?

Arianna Davis: That’s a good question. I wouldn’t say easier or harder, it’s been different. Digitally, we had the tools that we needed in order to create content. Our team works on Slack, so we were used to messaging each other using that platform. We file all of our stories using that messenger service and we had access to our CMS, so everything workwise could definitely be done digitally.

Just like every other industry right now, what our team is missing is that time together, having meetings, brainstorming face-to-face, just seeing everyone every day, that’s the piece we’re missing a bit of. But we’ve definitely been able to be just as productive working remotely. We just don’t get that face time. But we having been doing Zoom calls and lots of key meetings via Zoom, so I’ve been very thankful for the technology during this time.

Samir Husni: What has been the impact of the pandemic on the website?

Arianna Davis: The lens that we look at everything through is whether or not this will inspire our reader or helping them with their best life. If it’s a celebrity news story, we still want to make sure that the story is told from a positive perspective. That there is a point beyond contributing to the celebrity news cycle. Or the flip side of that, really digging in and finding the reported story or the essay that’s going to move our reader or stay with her for a long time.

That being said, we’ve never really done breaking news. We know that we’re not CNN or a newspaper, we’re more in the lifestyle and inspirational space. But when the pandemic hit, it was definitely tricky for us to find the balance. When we were publishing some of our typical content, we saw that it wasn’t getting as much traffic as it normally might. People weren’t clicking on the inspirational content at that time because all everyone wanted to read about was the Coronavirus to a point of near hysteria, everyone was so worried.

So, we had to pivot our content to figure out how we could be helpful and make sure we were providing our reader with stories that could help her, but at the same time not turn into a newsroom where we were just delivering bad news all day long, which was what most of the news cycle was at the time.

So, we pivoted some of our typical service content. Maybe it might have been: How To Be Productive When Working From Home, or giving tips to our readers on how to work from home while your child is also at home and your husband is home, and how do you find time for you. We just had to rethink our topics and our strategies a little. Just make sure we were providing service that was meaningful and timely.

Samir Husni: As the 20th anniversary issue comes out in print, what’s the digital counterpart going to be like?

Arianna Davis: Much of the content from the 20th anniversary issue will be going online and there will be an oral history of the magazine and how it came to be how the magazine has progressed through the years. It’s a really delightful story that I think readers will love that we’re going to do online in a big way.

But in addition to that we have a series called the “OG Chronicles,” which features Oprah and Gayle. It started out as kind of an advice column where they were on video answering questions and it has progressed to them sometimes playing fun games or interviewing each other. Oprah’s signature column in the magazine is “What I Know For Sure,” so we have a fun game, a lightning-round version of “What I Know For Sure,” where we asked Oprah and Gayle to each tell us what they know for sure about 20 different topics in 10 seconds or less. So, that’s a fun additional moment for the 20th anniversary.

We’re also covering all of the visionaries that they’ve been doing throughout the year with special extras, sometimes extra questions that they didn’t have space for in the magazine and we’re really celebrating those visionaries in a big way as well. The 20th anniversary will definitely be a big moment on the website in addition to print.

 Samir Husni: Did you ever imagine that you would be publishing or working during a pandemic?

Arianna Davis:  No, I never imagined a pandemic. I don’t think anyone saw it coming. Even when we started to hear things about the virus happening, I don’t think we saw it coming to this extent. I’ll be honest, March was a tough month, because as I mentioned, we’re still a relatively new site in the world of media, so for us, we’re really serious about what is our voice and our content and how can we be of service right now. That was important. We wanted to be sure we were aligned with what Oprah was feeling. It was not something that I would have ever saw coming.

I was an intern at the magazine right after college, so I don’t think I ever really foresaw the job of being the digital director at the time. I was still thinking of my career in print magazines. I definitely never foresaw that one day I would be running a nine million – plus user website, and definitely not in the midst of a pandemic. But here we are. (Laughs)

 Samir Husni: Anything you would like to add?

Arianna Davis: Just to pat ourselves on the back a little bit. We were the fastest-growing website launch in Hearst history, which I am really proud of that fact. When we were first launching oprahmag.com, a lot of people were surprised, most thought Oprah Magazine already had a website, and people were also surprised that we were launching something new in this media climate, in digital media.

So the fact that we were so fast-growing and we’ve been able to launch a lot of different series, the OG Chronicles that I mentioned; we have over five million views across platforms, so we’ve grown it quickly and I’m really proud of what we’ve done  with our team. I’m excited to see what’s next for us post-pandemic. And I’m happy we have this platform right now to offer our readers comfort and escape, and hopefully some service as well.

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Arianna Davis: The pandemic right now in this particular moment. Just worrying about family members and loved ones. I have had some loved ones who have been affected by this virus; I have had friends who have lost family members to this pandemic. I fell very lucky and blessed that I can work from home and that I do have a job. I’m working from an apartment that I love, but not everyone is so lucky. There’s just so much uncertainty right now and that keeps me up at night, in addition to traffic and making sure our website stays afloat in all of this. And that we are able to be a true resource to our readers at this time.

Samir Husni: Thank you.