Resume Rules: 2022

Resume Rules 2019

 

Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

A new year brings new resume tweaks.  Covid has changed things.  Job hunting is more tech-oriented than ever.  Working from home, office or a hybrid model have made professionals more time conscious so keeping your resume on target is a must. No one has time to waste.

Here are the resume rules for 2022:

Use a Professional Summary or Objective:

Whichever you use, keep it brief. You want to communicate your achievement. Leave out all the arrogant adjective – trustworthy, master, expert etc.  In your summary, you want to speak about your accomplishments.  In your objective, you want to highlight the skills you have used to get you where you are.

Include your Linkedin profile:

You have the ability to include more information on your profile than on your resume so include a link to your Linkedin profile on your resume.  Remember to update your profile and make sure dates etc. agree with your resume.

Make Your Resume Easy to Read:

With a remote workforce, resumes are read on a variety of devices – desktops, tablets and phones.  Remember to leave a lot of white space and bullet points.  Keep paragraphs to 2-3 sentences.  Applicant Tracking Systems don’t always read boxes, graphs and borders so simple is best. Try opening your resumes on different devices to see how easy it is to read.  Keep your resume to two pages, if you can.  Remember, you can use addendum pages to list accomplishments, awards, media hits etc.

Use an up-to-date font such as Avenir, Garamond or Calibri.

Include Pandemic-Related Content:

Showing how you managed your job while working remotely could be a plus.  Explain how you handled your clients, managed your staff or worked on new business in this new pandemic world.  Your motivation and resourcefulness could be a plus.

Vaccinated?  No one is sure if this will be an issue yet.  It’s a personal choice to put it on your resume or not.  In some cases, it might be important if the position requires you to go to the office for meetings.

The Basic Resume Rules don’t Change:

Your resume must:
1. Have just the pertinent information.
2. Be customized for each job.
3. Be strategic in content.
4. Have the most relevant information at the top of every section.
5. Be concise, have white space and be easy to read/scan.
6. Be applicant tracking system (ATS) ready – no headers/footers, graphs, color etc.
7. Not have old, outdated material.
8. Include appropriate keywords.
9. Use bullet points to make it easier to read.
10. Be error free.

Resume Styles:

There are three basic resume styles: Chronological, Functional, and Combination.
A chronological resume is still the most used format and it includes a listing of your work history, beginning with your most recent job. This is a great format for your master resume.
A functional resume highlights your major skills areas.
A combination resume utilizes parts of both the functional and chronological resumes. It lists skills on tope followed by the work history.
Whatever format you use, remember to customize your resume to target the specific abilities and duties listed in the description.

What Goes On Your Resume?

1. Your name, address, telephone numbers and email address. Identify your phone numbers if you are putting more than one (cell, business, home, message etc.)

If you are looking for a remote opportunity, put that under your personal information or in your objective/summary.

2. In your work history, put the company/agency name with a short explanation of the nature of the organization. Hiring managers might not be familiar with your employer or you might be working in a specific product unit.
3. If you are looking for work in a PR or Advertising agency, list your clients or account expertise.
4. Under education, list the school and degree.
5. If you are fluent in a language or have knowledge of specific or technical computer programs, list them.  Do not use general terms like computer literate and only list languages you are fluent in (read, write and speak.)
6. Current Board/Committee memberships can show your interest in a field or philanthropic area. List them.

What Does Not Go On Your Resume?

1. Don’t list any personal information such as birthdays, marital status etc. While common practice outside of the US, it is not legal here.
2. Keep the names of your references on a separate sheet and give them out when asked.
3. Salary information does not belong on the resume. If a job ad asks for salary history, it should go in your cover letter.
4. Don’t include any activities that are not relevant. You can always make a separate addendum page if you want them.
5. The phrase, “References available on request” is outdated and should not be used.

6. If you have been working for ten or more years, you can drop the bullet points from earlier jobs.  It’s the company name, title and dates of employment that are necessary.

When writing your Resume, remember to:

1. Eliminate pronouns. Resumes should not include I, he/she.
2. Tailor your summary to the position you are applying.
3. Don’t include non-sequitur information.
4. Use bullet points to make it easier to read.
5. Avoid jargon/buzzwords.
6. Do not include personal information.
7. If you feel your resume is too long, eliminate from the bottom. You don’t really need bullet points for your first jobs.
8. Include as many keywords as possible. Use the keywords from the advertisement or job description when possible.

Words Not to Include on Your Resume:

Unnecessary words that don’t add anything, describe anything or showcase your writing ability should be eliminated from your resume. You want to be clear and concise so eliminate words like:

Extensive experience
Innovative
Motivated
Results-oriented
Dynamic
Team player
Fast-paced
Problem solver
Entrepreneurial
Liaison
Business-savvy
Interface with
Aptitude for
Works well with
Good communication skills
Measurable results
Good work ethic
Bottom-line oriented

Words to Add to Your Resume:

Directed
Handled
Initiated
Achieved
Spearheaded
Maximized
Increased
Implemented
Generated
Exceeded
Quantified
Negotiated
Organized
Pioneered
Presented
Reviewed
Strengthened
Trained
Collaborated

Sending Your Resume:

It’s a digital world when it comes to job hunting so your resume will be sent electronically.
Transmitting your resume with a generic name can cause it to be overlooked or to get lost in the system. Be professional and name your resume file properly. You want hiring managers to know it’s your resume and make it easier to track through their email system.

1. Use either a PDF or Microsoft Word Format.
2. Personalize your file by adding your name – MarieRapertoResume.
3. Don’t use a version number. Just keep it simple.

Remember – Customization is King!




Resume Writing: Stuck For Verbs?

Resume Rules - 2018

 

Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

Resume writing is a hard job. Deciding what to include, what buzzwords to use, what length it should be can be intimidating at times. Perhaps the most annoying is not duplicating verbs. Thanks to Career Cloud, here are some substitutions you can make.

Instead of ACHIEVED: Accelerated, Accomplished, Advanced, Amplified, Attained, Boosted, Completed, Created, Delivered, Demonstrated, Earned, Enacted, Enhanced, Expanded, Expedited, Generated, Improved, Lifted, Managed, Maximized, Outpaced, Produced, Reached, Stimulated, Surpassed.

Instead of ASSISTED: Aided, Advanced, Boosted, Counseled, Coached, Cooperated, Collaborated, Facilitated, Promoted, Reinforced, Supported.

Instead of COMMUNICATED: Advocated, Authored, Clarified, Composed, Consulted, Conveyed, Corresponded, Defined, Explained, Fielded, Illustrated, Informed, Interacted, Mediated, Moderated, Negotiated, Networked, Promoted, Persuaded.

Instead of CREATED: Altered, Built, Crafted, Designed, Devised, Drafted, Envisioned, Established, Fashioned, Formulated, Initiated, Invented, Launched, Overhauled, Piloted, Pioneered, Rebuilt.

Instead of DECREASED: Condensed, Conserved, Consolidated, Deducted, Eased, Lessened, Reduced.

Instead of EXPERIENCED: Accomplished, Capable, Competent, Qualified, Skilled, Cultivated.

Instead of IMPROVED: Boosted, Converted, Customized, Influenced, Integrated, Merged, Redesigned, Overhauled, Remodeled, Reorganized, Restructured, Revitalized, Saved, Streamlined, Strengthened, Transformed, Updated.

Instead of INCREASED: Advanced, Capitalized, Delivered, Enhanced, Expanded, Furthered, Generated, Maximized.

Instead of LED: Directed, Enacted, Executed, Guided, Impacted, Influenced, Initialized, Orchestrated, Oversee, Spearheaded.

Instead of MANAGED: Aligned, Coordinated, Cultivated, Directed, Enabled, Facilitated, Fostered, Guided, Motivated, Piloted, Supervised, Trained.

Instead of Worked On: Arranged, Compiled, Composed, Constructed, Crafted, Created, Developed, Fashioned, Forged, Formulated, Operated, Organized, Prepared, Set-up, Undertook.

Happy updating!

 

 

 




Professional Resume Writing: Pros and Cons

Resume Rules 2019

 

Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

Thinking about using a professional resume writing service? These services are very common and useful but they are not for everyone. Consider these points before you hire any service:

  1. Price.  These services can be expensive. Make sure you can afford to do this and check around for prices/services as they can vary greatly. Very low rates and rapid turnaround times should be a red flag.
  2. Writer. Who is going to write your resume and what are their qualifications? Do they have experience writing resumes in your field? Look at their samples. Do all the resumes look alike or are they individualized to fit client backgrounds?
  3. Time. To get the best resume will require time on your part. The resume writer may have questionnaires for you to fill out and/or want to interview you. A writer must know your complete work history and achievements and understand what you see as your next opportunity. After a first draft, you must provide feedback. A resume writing service is not a time saver.
  4. Agreement. Before you sign anything, check out the service as much as you can. Read the agreement and watch out for caveats. How many revisions will you receive, what is the time period, are their others costs involved?

Remember, a resume writing service will make your resume look more appealing and the writing/grammar may be better than what you could do. What they can’t do is write a resume that will get you a job for which you are not qualified.

Like everything in life, an educated consumer is the best customer.




Resume Impressions: 5 Points To Improve Yours

Your Resume: 10 Items To Remove ImmediatelyMarie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

Your resume gives an impression of you. It’s a quick, first-glance impression that a hiring manager makes while scanning your resume. To make it to the next step, your resume must tell the employer that you can do the job they want to fill.  Take a look at your resume for the following:

  1.  Does your resume clearly and concisely list your skills as mentioned in the job ad? Sending in one resume-for-all-jobs will no longer work. You must customize your resume for each opportunity stressing the matches you have to their description.
  2. Is your opening statement (if you have one)in synch with the job description? If your statement reads that you are a seasoned communications professional in the consumer sector but the job description is for a public relations professional with 10 plus years in a B2B sector, you need to revise this.  You can make it more general or mention any relevant sector experience from the past. You want to highlight how you fit not how you don’t.
  3. Are you saying the same things over and over?  Some duplication can highlight strengths but it can also make the resume too crowded with unnecessary repeated information.
  4. Do you list your skills?  If so, make sure they match what the employer wants.  If you have additional skills, you can mention those in your last bullet point under your current employment.
  5. Not enough white space on your resume?  Resumes are scanned quickly and white space makes them easier to read.  In your work history, it’s not necessary to list bullet points for your earliest jobs.  The employer/title/dates is sufficient and removing the bullet points will give you more room.

Listing jobs online means employers are receiving hundreds of resumes.  Make yours standout by giving the reader all the information they are seeking.




Liar, Liar: 10 Reasons Not to Lie On Your Resume

 

10 Reasons Not to Lie On Your Resume

 

Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

Lies on resumes. You’ve seem them, you’ve heard about it being done and, maybe, you’ve done it.  One thing is for sure:  You will get caught.    Stretching the truth is a lie and it can come back to haunt you. So why do it?

First, you could get into serious trouble: Rescinding of the job offer, being fired or facing criminal charges. Lying about military service or being untruthful when seeking federal or state employment can be a crime.  You also seriously damage your reputation and jeopardize future employment opportunities.

According to a survey from TopResume, 97% of professionals said that discovering a lie on a resume would cause them to reconsider/dismiss a job candidate.  57% said they know someone who has embellished their resumes.  89% agreed that lying about academic degrees was a serous offense as was being untruthful about a criminal record (88%).

Remember, it’s easy for an employer to discover the truth.

  1.  Your degree can easily be confirmed by the school.
  2.  Most employers are using writing, language and other tests of skills.
  3.  Your dates don’t look right.  Listing your job history by just the year to cover up gaps is a big no-no.
  4.  Resume/cover letter differences.  You can have your resume written by the best but, if your cover letter is not equally as good, an employer will question your skills.
  5.  Not being able to elaborate on the items on your resume is a huge giveaway.
  6.  Unrealistic job titles.  Five year’s of experience and you are a VP is not realistic. Also job titles can be checked when a company does references.
  7.  When you are covering up something, your body tells the truth. When an interviewer questions something you haven’t done, your body will betray you.
  8.  References don’t always hold up.  You can ask a reference to embellish for you but a skilled interviewer will get the truth.
  9.  Your online presence can be very telling and Google is very helpful.  Your company went out of business last month, Google may have different information.  Went to XX University for four years?  Then why are you in a WW University alumni group.
  10.  Formal background checks will uncover any lies about your work history, criminal past, education, professional certifications etc.

The truth is out there!

 

 




How to Add Language Proficiency Levels to Your Resume

Laura Garbers, CraftResumes

Good levels of language proficiency are a real bonus for those looking to produce an impressive resume in search of a position in a number of different career sectors. A resume skills list is something that catches the eye of artificial intelligence (AI) that many companies use these days to create a shortlist of job applicants. The skills and achievements that you can point to in your resume are important elements in the process of getting beyond the initial stages in an application. That stage is filtering out applications that do not appear suitable for the position and reaching an idea of who should be considered for a shortlist.

Liar, Liar - 10 Reasons Not to Lie On Your ResumeThe list of languages that you might have will help you stand out and perhaps you even have a resume in Spanish that can be used in very specialist job applications? That will definitely demonstrate your language proficiency. The world has become smaller in the digital age and many companies buy and sell from other continents and need good language skills as well as products and services that will result in a successful business.

You need to be aware of what the company you wish to join requires beyond what a standard resume will tell them. That should not be a problem for anyone regularly writing for clients who want to impress enough to pass the initial filtering service, as already mentioned, regularly done by AI. 

If you want to know how to list languages on resume you can get more info here. Your levels of proficiency will be important if you are applying for a job where there may be the need to correspond in a foreign language. That is especially the case if you find yourself in live video conferencing or having to travel abroad without a translator to somewhere where English skills are not widely developed. Limited working proficiency may not be enough.

Language Proficiency Levels

Basic

Your resume such be objective and if you only have a very basic knowledge of a language, you should say so. There are occasions when that is quite sufficient because of the support that others with better proficiency levels can provide in the office. Where you are uncertain about how to describe your skills, read more here.

Working

If the role involves travel and regular communication with overseas clients, good working knowledge will usually be important. In most instances, the levels of fluency required are likely to be to non-technical conversational standard.

Fluent

Those whose language levels involve complete fluency are valuable people. Achieving fluency will usually mean extensive study, or it may be a secondary family language. The level of proficiency may not be the deciding factor in getting a job where language is just one element of what a company is looking for. However, you will certainly have ticked an important box in the application process that looks at skill levels.

Summary

A language skills resume must be objective but also laid out in a clear and concise way. If you are looking for help to create that, professional writers whose everyday jobs are based upon their command of English can be very useful. You are perfectly entitled to use such services because it is your own level of proficiency and your own skills that go into the resume that is finally prepared. It may need to be personalized to a specific application, depending upon how the vacancy has been advertised.  That should be a minor issue if it is well written in the first place.


About the Author: Laura Garbers specializes in careers’ advice and coaching at CraftResumes. She holds one-on-one sessions, interviews, and coaching sessions as well as writing extensively on the subject. The insight she provides gives her readership important information on any aspect of their careers.




Resume Mistakes: 7 Mistakes To Avoid

Resume Rules - 2018Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

Resume mistakes can cost you a job.  Even in an environment where jobs are plentiful and candidates scarce, mistakes on your resume can get you eliminated from the search.  Hiring managers don’t spend more than a minute reviewing resumes so you have to make a great impression in a short time frame.  Here are 7 mistakes to avoid:

  1.  Typos.  Your resume represents who you are.  You don’t want someone to think you are sloppy and can’t proof read.  It’s important to check and recheck your resume every time you send it out.
  2.  Formatting Problems.  You want to show an employer that you are detailed-oriented.  Formatting errors will show that you are not.  Watch out for any inconsistencies in format – using bold for headlines, size of type fonts, spaces between numbers, etc.
  3.  Not Customizing Your Resume.  In today’s market, every time you send out your resume, you should be customizing it to the specs mentioned in the ad.  You want to show an employer that you are qualified to fill this particular position.
  4.  Clichés And Overused Words.  Use verbs that are action oriented and make sure not to use the same one twice.  Quotes and clichés will only make the reader roll their eyes.  Keep your resume simple and to the point.
  5.  Tailor Your Summary/Objective.  You make think you have a general summary or objective on the job of your resume.  However, you need to make it fit the job.  Tailoring is everything.
  6.  Too Much/Too Little.  You need to insure that your resume is scannable and easy to read.  The information in your resume should pertain to a particular position.  Any other information can be distracting.
  7.  Use Appropriate Keywords.  Part of customizing your resume is using keywords from an employer’s ad or job description. This is particularly important if you are applying online.  Applicant Tracking Software uses keywords to find qualified candidates.



A Complete Guide to Resume Writing in the Blockchain Industry

Grace Carter, Editor, UKWritings

The blockchain industry is one of the most expansive industries in recent years and is one of the most demanded sectors in the world of work. With new updates and technology coming out all the time, and pay grades ranging in the $158K average range, it’s no wonder the industry is so popular.

However, if you’re planning to make your move into the blockchain industry and start or progress your career, you’re going to need the perfect resume to create those opportunities. Always remember when applying for a job that your resume is your first impression, so you’ll want to make it count.

Today, we’re going to explore everything you need to know in order to craft this stellar resume, giving you everything you need to get the blockchain career you’re looking for.

Read the Job Description

Before you start writing anything, it’s important to go through the job description you’re applying for and make sure you have absolute clarity when it comes to what the company wants to know. Read through it several times.

When reading, make notes on the key points you’ll want to address in your resume to ensure you don’t leave anything out.

It’s important that you write a new resume for every job you’re applying for. This keeps your resume from sounding too generic and will give you the opportunity to maximize your chances for securing an interview.

Consider the Qualifications Required

One of the most important things your recruiter will be looking for is your qualifications in the blockchain industry. Ideally, you’re going to want to detail your computer or engineering backgrounds, or some kind of digital science.

This will be what the recruiter is looking for, so make sure it’s clearly visible as one of your first points. You will also need to demonstrate your ability to work with cryptocurrency, or at least prove you have a basic grasp of what it is and how it works.

Know Your Company

There are businesses of all sizes hiring people in the blockchain industry, and it’s important you know what you’re dealing with when it comes to writing your resume. Some of the companies may be large global companies, or some may be domestic start-ups.

Knowing this information is important because you’ll be able to craft your resume to suit the needs of that business. Read up on the company’s mission statement and visions, as well as researching their social media pages to get an idea of what they stand for.

Write to the Highest Quality

Any mistakes, typos or grammatical errors and the recruiter won’t take your application seriously. If you doubt your writing ability, use online tools that can help.

Showcase Your Experiences

Since blockchain is a relatively new industry, many recruiters are still unsure of what they’re looking for, especially those in smaller businesses. With that in mind, the more detail you can share about your involvement in the blockchain industry, the better.

Have you attended courses? Have you attended seminars and blockchain meetups? What past experience do you have working with blockchain technology; both in your career and personal life? These are all things you’re going to need to include in your resume to stand out.

While you need to remember to try not to overload your recruiter with information, it’s important that you clearly showcase your involvement in the industry and thus what you can bring to the table.

If you haven’t got much to say in this area, then you’re probably going to need to spend some time getting the experiences. Otherwise, you won’t be hired onto the next stage of the recruitment process.




A Master Resume: What It Is and How To Create One

Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

A master resume is a document that lists absolutely everything you have done and that completely describes all of your work experience.  This will provide you with a simple way to keep everything in one place and it can help you produce a tailored resume quickly.  It will also help you remember dates and titles, etc. for applications.

  1.  First, create a master resume file.  Open a file and list everything you’ve ever done.  Every job you have had and every skill, accomplishment and responsibility.  You can keep it in sections or chronologically.
  2. When a new job opportunity presents itself, go to your master file to create a new, customized resume that shows how you would fit in to this job.  Add in pertinent skill keywords.
  3. You can add in current references with up-to-date contact information, work samples and portfolio links.
  4. Once you have a master resume, you can make a digital copy and delete out non-relevant information or you can copy info to your working resume.



Resume Rules

Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

In today’s world, you should always have a resume ready even if you are not currently looking for a position.  Keeping your resume current allows you to see what you have accomplished each year and it can help prepare you for your annual review and, if something does come up, you don’t have to start from scratch.  With applicant tracking systems, social media sites and a hiring manager’s time, resumes have changed more in the last five years than the ten prior ones.  Customization, easy-to-read keyword specific resumes that can be read on varied screen sizes are essential.   You must remember that a recruiter scans a resume for approximately 6.25 seconds.  Eighty percent of those six seconds is spent looking at your name, current title and company, previous title and company, start and end dates for current and past positions and education.  The remaining time is spent looking for keywords that match the open position. 

Your resume must have:

1.  Just the pertinent information.

2.  It should be tailored to a particular position.

3. Be strategic with the content you include.

4.  Proof, proof and proof.

5.  Make sure it can be read easily.

6.  Include any metrics that you can.

7.  Take out any old, outdated material.

8.  Add specific keywords.

9.  Make sure your contact information is correct and that phone numbers are labelled home, mobile etc.  If you include your LinkedIn URL or online portfolio, check to insure the links work.

10.  Name your file with your name and date.

Your first step is to pick the format best for you.  There are basically four resume styles:

1)  Chronological: The body of this type of resume includes a listing of your work history, beginning with your most recent job. 

Use when:  

  • The length of time on each job can be seen as a strength.  
  • Your work experience is in line with your job objective.
  • Job titles or employers are impressive.
  • You want to highlight career advances.
  • THIS IS THE MOST COMMON RESUME FORMAT

 2)  Functional:  The body of this type of resume highlights your major skill areas.

 Use when:

  •  You want to change fields.
  •  You have the skills but not the work experience.
  • You have acquired skills through unpaid experience.
  • You have had many different work experiences not directly related to the position you are seeking.  (Note: Functional Resumes are not as common as they once were and many hiring managers believe that using a functional resume means you are hiding something.  If you choose this format, be very careful to include all pertinent information and dates.)

3)  Combination:  The body of this type of resume utilizes parts of both the  functional and chronological resumes.

Use when:

  • You have acquired a number of skills while progressing on one or several jobs and you want to highlight specific ones.

4)  Targeted:  A targeted resume focuses on specific abilities and duties that directly  relate to a specific job.

Use when: 

  • This type of resume is prepared specifically for one position and should show your qualifications against the job’s specified qualifications.

The Targeted resume is the most favored right now.   With Applicant Tracking Systems in use, targeting your resume for each and every ad you answer is essential.

A resume should be your personal marketing piece. It should tell enough about you so someone will want to meet you but not enough about you so that you can be eliminated from a search. Everyone has preferences as to resume format.  Make sure that you are comfortable with the one you are using and that it clearly shows all the information.

Don’t try to use a template.  Customize your resume so that your experience shows.  It should be very easy to read and not text-heavy.

Resume Fonts

The typeface you choose for your resume is very important.  Your resume needs to be as clear and concise as possible.  It also must be read on many types of devises from desktops to mobile phones.  Sans-serif typefaces are best for small screens and the easiest to read on all screens.  Make sure your resume is readable as research shows that hiring managers and recruiters only scan resumes for 6-8 seconds.  Typing in sans-serif fonts on your computer will give you a complete list, but here are some of the most common:

  • Arial
  • Arial Narrow
  • Book Antiqua
  • Calibri
  • Cambria
  • Didot
  • Garamond
  • Trebuchet MS
  • Times New Roman
  • Verdana

Resume Rules - 2018Resume Basics

Remember, it’s  not your autobiography. Your resume is your chance to call attention to you and what you’ve done as it pertains to the open job description. You must be careful to be specific, concise and to the point.  You want the hiring manager to want to learn more about you.  It is not a list of your current and past job descriptions.  It is a list of the things you have done that will get you to the position you want.  Using the right key words will increase your chances of making the first round.  

The most relevant information should be started at the top of every section to get the reader’s attention.

Bullets can set your resume apart and make it easier for a reader to scan.

Remember, headers/footers, graphs, color etc., may not be read on every computer and that resumes with these items may not get through an applicant tracking system (ATS).

Some Job Facts:  You should be getting 5 or 6 first interviews for every 100 targeted resumes you send out.  (Targeted resumes are written with the job description/ad in mind.) If you are not, you might be sending out resumes to every ad you see, whether the job fits or not. Also, have someone review your resume to make sure it’s clear as to what you are looking for and that it doesn’t contain a typo.

You should be getting one second interview for every 8 first interviews. If not, ask yourself whether you need to polish your interviewing skills. Are you coming across as desperate or unsure?

Have you ever been a finalist for more than 8 or 9 positions and not landed a job? If so, try to review what happened. If the companies hired from within, there isn’t anything you could have done. If the company decided not to hire anyone, there isn’t anything you could have done. But to get this far this many times and not have closed the deal suggests that something is wrong. For starters, you might want to review your references. Are you giving them enough information so that they can be helpful? Consider adding new ones to the list. Sometimes, the personality of the reference makes a big difference, too!

What Goes on Your Resume and What Doesn’t

To start the year off, do a basic review of what and what does not go on a resume. It may sound elementary but many resumes don’t follow the rules. If you have been in the workforce and not looking for your first job, here’s what should and should not go on your resume.

What to Put on Your Resume

  • Your name, address, telephone numbers and email address. Identify your phone numbers if you are putting more than one (cell, business, home, message etc.) If you are looking for a job out of town and want to be relocated, put your full address on the top, as usual. If you are looking for a position where you have a residence or a place to stay lined up, leave off your address or use the address at the location.  Also, remember to check the email and voice mail you list regularly.
  • In your description, put the company/agency name with a short explanation of the nature of the organization. Hiring managers might not be familiar with your employer or you may be working in a specific product unit of a large conglomerate.
  • If you are working for an agency, list your clients or expertise within a specific industry.
  • Under education, list the school, degree and dates. You might not want to put your graduation dates fearing ageism will come into play. However, not having any dates makes your resume “suspicious” and can make you look even older than you are.
  • If you are fluent in languages (s) or have knowledge of specific or technical computer programs, do list them.
  • Current Board/Committee memberships can show your interest in your field or in philanthropic areas. These should go on your resume.

What Not to Put on Your Resume 

  • Don’t list any personal information such as birthdays, marital status etc. While this is common practice outside of the U.S., it is not legal here.
  • Keep the names of your references on a separate sheet and give them out when asked. First, you don’t want to give out personal information or put it out online and, secondly, remember that you always want to speak with your references to tell them who will be calling and the nature of the job before they get the call.
  • Salary information does not belong on the resume. If a job ad is asking for salary history, it should go in your cover letter.
  • Don’t include any activities that are not relevant. Long lists of past Boards/Committees or sports that do not pertain to your job search should not be included.
  • Do not include the phrase, “References available on request.” The fact that an applicant has references is taken for granted.

Resume Objective/Summary

One of the most difficult parts of the resume seems to be the Objective or Summary. Here are some tips to help you decide which one to use and what to include.

Use an Objective if you are looking for a specific opportunity or an opportunity within a specific discipline.

Examples:

  •  A senior-level communications position within a global consumer company.
  • Social and digital media specialist position within a healthcare agency.
  • Interested in furthering my career with an agency that focuses on international direct marketing.

Summary paragraphs are better for experienced, multi-disciplined professionals.

Examples:

  • Extensive management experience in integrated marketing, including work with a global consumer products company and a major financial services company.
  • Over 10 years of experience in public relations with a special emphasis directing media relations, social media, crisis and issues management and financial communications.
  • Fifteen years experience in communications. Specialties include investor relations, public policy issues and crisis communications.

When writing your Objective/Summary Statement, remember:

  • It’s ok not to have one.
  • If using an Objective, it should be as specific as possible.
  • The objective of a resume is to find employment so don’t put this in your statement.

Summary statements should be brief and to-the-point. Ideally 2 to 3 sentences. Statements should contain the information you want the reader to see and cover the disciplines/keywords you want to highlight.

Remember to:

  • Eliminate the pronouns.  Resumes should not contain I, he/she.  They are written as if you are the subject.
  • Keep it short.
  • Eliminate buzz words.
  • Sell yourself.  Tailor your summary to the position.
  • Don’t include non-sequitur information.
  • Do not list specifics.
  • Use bullets when possible to make it easier to scan.
  • Avoid jargon.
  • Don’t exaggerate.
  • Do not include personal information.
  • If you feel your resume is too long, eliminate from the bottom.  You don’t really need to explain your first jobs.  So just list the title, company and dates.
  • If you decide to use an Objective or Summary statement, it will set the tone for what you highlight in the Experience Section of your resume. Think it through and be comfortable with it. You are selling yourself to someone who doesn’t know you. What do you want to highlight?

Words Not To Use On Your Resume

Unnecessary words, words that don’t add anything, describe anything or showcase your writing ability should be eliminated from your resume.  Buzz words are no longer accepted in communication resumes.  If you see any of the words below in your resume, delete them.  Ask yourself why they are in your resume and can you support their use.  You want to clear and concise.  Meaningful words only.

  • Extensive experience
  • Innovative
  • Motivated
  • Results-oriented
  • Dynamic
  • Team player
  • Fast-paced
  • Problem solver
  • Entrepreneurial
  • Liaison
  • Business-savvy
  • Interface with
  • Aptitude for
  • Works well with
  • Good communication skills
  • Measureable results
  • Good work ethic
  • Bottom-line oriented

Words To Add To Your Resume

  • Directed
  • Handled
  • Initiated
  • Achieved
  • Spearheaded
  • Maximized
  • Innovated
  • Increased
  • Implemented
  • Generated
  • Exceeded
  • Quantified
  • Negotiated
  • Organized
  • Pioneered
  • Presented
  • Reviewed
  • Strengthened
  • Trained
  • Collaborated

Applicant Tracking Systems

Today, most resumes go through an Applicant Tracking System (ATS).  When you answer an online ad or submit your resume online, resumes go through an ATS.  All applicant tracking systems work basically the same. They use a ‘parser’ to read the information in your resume.          

The parser will read the information it has been given by the company.  In most cases, this information consists of keywords pulled from the job description used. Unfortunately you don’t know the keywords or the parameters entered into the system. What this means is your resume submission must use the exact terminology in the ad or description or you risk the parser not forwarding your resume.

Yes, you read that correctly. Just because you submitted your resume and received notification that it was accepted, it doesn’t mean it will reach the hiring manager or HR. Unfortunately, unqualified candidates answer job ads so the applicant tracking system helps to sort out qualified resumes.       

It is important that you customize your resume to each job description. Your resume is scored for relevancy. Relevancy is based on the correlating matches between your resume and the job description’s keywords.

You must also read the disclaimers/information on the web site. You need to know how long a company keeps your resume, can you update it and can you apply for different positions or does one resume submission cover other jobs as they become available. This is important because one general resume for a media relations position may not fit the qualifications for a corporate communications position etc. Some companies post a new position and look at the resumes they receive for that position. They don’t go through the database to search for other candidates. You need to know how long it will be on file so you know when to resubmit it.

 If you have submitted a resume online, a recruiter cannot resubmit it.

When submitting your resume online “think keywords.” Computer software programs make matches by keywords. Read the ad, job description and any other materials so you can use the company’s words as your keywords.  If you are an experienced professional, you probably need 20+ keywords in your resume. Always remember to position yourself. If you are going to post your resume online, find the right sites. If you are a senior-level professional, look for sites that only handle your level or area of expertise.

Customizing Your Resume

Tailoring your resume so you get the interview is what you want to do.  You can’t please everyone with one resume.  Each hiring manager/recruiter could be looking for something different.  That’s why it is so important to customize your resume for each job.  It might sound tedious and time-consuming but with a few tips you can get it done easily.

When answering an ad or reviewing a job description:

Hunt for the keywords.  Watch for keywords like external relations, digital marketing etc. and also note how many times they were mentioned.  The more an ad or description mentions a specific keyword, the more important it is and you should make sure to add it more than once.

Look for job skills.  While keywords are usually the disciplines, the job skills will further define responsibilities such as managing, supervising, writing/editing.

Pick the most important keywords and see if you can add an accomplishment to it.

Lastly: Sending Your Resume

Knowing how to name your resume is extremely important.  It’s a digital world when it comes to job hunting.  It doesn’t matter if you are answering an ad online, emailing HR or a recruiter.  Sending your resume with a generic name can cause it to be overlooked or lost in the system.  Be professional and make sure you name it properly.  You want hiring managers to know it’s your resume and make it easier to track through their email system.

Use either a PDF or Microsoft Word Format

Personalize your file by adding your name – MarieRapertoResume.

Remember to be consistent and use the same style for the resume name, cover letter or sample documents.

You can capitalize words, use spaces or dashes.

Don’t use a version number.  You don’t want to give the impression that you keep changing your resume.  You can use your computer to keep track of different versions.

Test all the links included in your resume.

Happy Resume Writing!




Your Google Resume: 4 Items To Check

Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

Your Google resume, what’s that?  According to job search expert, Susan P. Joyce, you have one and it’s what recruiters and others find when they search Google for your name.

Do we recruiters do this? Definitely.

To be found on Google, you should be on the first two pages of the search results because that’s where most people look.

Check you Google profile and see what comes up.  Simply type in the name you use on your resume and the results will pop up.

  • You want results to show.  Communication and marketing professionals need to be visible.
  • Your LinkedIn profile should be visible on Google and near the top of the first page.  Your LinkedIn tag line should also show.  Make sure that it accurately describes you.
  • If you have a common name, add your middle name/initial or nickname.  If there are too many other people with the same name, you can mistaken for someone else.
  • Author of articles/books, make sure the name you use is the same as the one on your resume.

Remember, just like you search for information on Google, recruiters and hiring managers also do it.  Checking your Google resume often will insure your information is correct.




What Time? The Best Day And Time To Submit Your Resume

Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

What’s the best time and day to submit your resume?

Just as research has shown that Tuesday afternoon is the best time to have a meeting recent, research from TalentWorks lets us know the best day and time to submit a resume.

Research was collected from 1,610 online job applications submitted at random times from a wide range of work experience. The data was collected from job applicants across a broad array of industries, and with job titles ranging from entry level to executive.

Of course, as with most research findings, there are no absolutes. But there are conclusions drawn to help you maximize your chance of securing a job interview if you choose the optimal time and day to submit your resume.

Here’s what the research showed:

  1. The best time to submit an application was between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m.  These applications were nearly five times more likely to land an interview.
  2. After 10 a.m., the odds of getting an interview fell by 10 percent every 30 minutes except at lunch-time.  Submissions at 12:30 p.m. had about an 11 percent chance of leading to an interview.
  3. The worst time is after 7:30 p.m.
  4. Applications should be submitted within the first few days that a job is posted.  TalentWorks found that applying within 96 hours of the initial posting makes it eight times more likely to get an interview.
  5. Tuesday is also the best day to apply.  It’s also the most common day for companies to post new jobs.

Will the day and time help in your search?  Timing does matter.




It’s Almost 2018: 5 Tips To Get Your Resume Ready

Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

It’s almost 2018 and it’s a good time to take a look at your resume.

It’s a living document that should be periodically updated to reflect what you have done and to position yourself for what you want to do.  Once it’s updated, you can reconnect with recruiters and contacts.

Here’s what to update:

  • Your current position.  Make sure your resume reflects what you have done over the past year.  Add any metrics/accomplishments or skills, new clients or products etc.
  • Your overall resume.  Is it too long or too wordy.  Review your early career jobs.  You may not need explanations or bullet points for these.  Just the company, title and dates might be enough.  Start taking out unnecessary words and any buzz words.  Your resume should be very concise and readable.
  • Add/Change keywords.  You may have taken on new responsibilities.  Double check your keywords to ensure they are current.
  • References.  While not listed on your resume, they are important to update.  Has anyone moved or transferred?  Is there anyone new you would want to add/delete.  A current list of references and their contact information is essential.
  • Your contact information.  If you’ve moved or changed anything, make sure to update your resume.  If your social media contacts are on the resume, make sure they are still current and working.  If you have an online portfolio, do you want to add the link?

A once-a-year tune up is necessary!




Traditional And Online Resumes: How To Customize Your Resume For Human and Computer Scanning

Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

Today, many companies require applicants to enter their resumes online. Doing so, allows the company to use their Applicant Tracking System (ATS) to keep track of respondents and to forward the resumes that fit the job specifications to human resources or the hiring manager. To get your resume ready for an online submission, you must first understand Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) and how they work. Doing so, may get you the interview you want.

First, What is an Applicant Tracking System (ATS)?

An ATS is a software application a company uses to manage the recruitment process. The program sorts through resumes to determine those that are the best match to the job descriptions.

These systems scan your resume for key words as any hiring manager/recruiter would. They all look for the primary criteria listed in the posted job description or ad.

How an ATS Works:

Most companies use their ATS to manage applications for a specific job. Many ATS software programs are available for sale. All applicant tracking systems are slightly different and can be customized for a client. Applicant tracking systems “parse” the information in the resumes submitted and place the information in specific fields within each company’s ATS database/form. The system then analyzes the criteria (keywords) for the open position and assigns a score and a rank. If they meet the requirements, the ATS form shows up for the recruiter/hiring manager to review.

What does this mean for you?

What this means for job applicants is that their resume must be ATS friendly. This is absolutely critical to a successful job hunt. Qualified candidates that fail to make an ATS friendly resume will get rejected.

Here are five of the most common reasons resumes do not make it through an ATS:

1. The ATS can’t actually process your resume.
2. The ATS doesn’t recognize the headings you used.
3. Your resume needs targeted keywords.
4. Your resume should not have nonspecific keywords.
5. Your resume needs industry and company jargon and abbreviations.

Let’s look at each area:

The first step is to keep in mind what a recruiter/hiring manager actually sees.

When a recruiter clicks on the name of a candidate whom the applicant tracking system has ranked as a good match for a job, a recruiter sees the information the applicant tracking system pulled from the candidate’s resume into a data base.

This format can differ by company but can contain different database fields for information on a resume, such as candidate’s name, contact details, work experience, job titles, education, employer names and periods of employment. An ATS tries to identify the information on an applicant’s resume, but if a resume isn’t formatted according to the applicant tracking system, it won’t pull this information into the proper fields. Some of it might be missed altogether, such as skills profile or an executive summary.

The ATS can’t actually process your resume:

1. Check to see how the company wants the resume submitted. Will it take PDFs or Word documents? Both Word and PDF documents can cause problems with an ATS so it’s important to check. If no information is given, submit resumes in text format which has no known parsing problems with screening software.
2. Don’t use graphics, logos, or tables in your resume. When you embed graphics, images, tables and logos you can choke the ATS software and your resume may be rejected.

The ATS doesn’t recognize something on your resume:

1. Don’t place dates before work experience on your resume. Begin with the name of the employer, then your professional title and the date range. Don’t forget to include all titles you held at your company.
2. Include your address. Many programs will reject your resume without a postal address. Locations may even be included as keywords. Since most ATS algorithms do not read headers and footers, make sure your address is not within them.
3. Choose your font wisely. Use sans-serif fonts like Verdana or Tahoma instead of serif fonts like Times New Roman or Cambria.
4. Replace the career objective/summary with a bulleted qualifications summary. This way you can work more keywords into your resume.
5. Use bullets rather than paragraphs. Bulleted lists are much easier for readers and scanners to pull information out.

Your resume needs keywords/has nonspecific keywords.

1. Use the same keywords included in the job advertisement/description.
2. Use the company’s website for additional keywords. The WALL STREET JOURNAL has suggested that matching interests with a company can help. If a company is interested in nutrition and you have done work in that area, put that keyword in your resume.
3. Check with insiders. Ask what specific skills the company looks for.
4. Put job-related keywords throughout your resume not just in one list.
5. Avoid creative wording. ATS screen only for matching keywords.
6. Repeat important keywords at least twice in your resume.

Your resume needs industry and company jargon/abbreviations.

1. Use the lingo. Every profession has its own words. Use them.
2. Use acronyms and spelled out titles, organizations etc. Since you don’t know if the abbreviation or the full words will be scanned for, use both.

Some other tips:

1. Don’t worry about your resume. The ATS doesn’t care how long it is. The longer it is, the more keywords you can have.
2. Use a cloud service. Use services like Wordle and TagCrowd to help you determine the right keywords. They are simple to use. Just download your resume and the job description and the program will do the rest.

The Next Step:

If you’ve created an ATS resume and you land an interview, remember that you now need the traditional resume to give to the recruiter/interviewers.

To create your traditional resume, first decide on a format:

1) Chronological: The body of this type of resume includes a listing of your work history, beginning with your most recent job.

Use when:

The length of time on each job can be seen as a strength.
Your work experience is in line with your job objective.
Job titles or employers are impressive.
You want to highlight career advances.
THIS IS THE MOST COMMON RESUME FORMAT.

2) Functional: The body of this type of resume highlights your major skill areas.

Use when:

You want to change fields.
You have skills but not the work experience.
You have acquired skills through unpaid experience.

You have many different work experiences not directly related to the position you are seeking.
(Note: Functional Resumes are not as common as they once were. Many hiring managers believe using a functional resume means you are hiding something. If you choose this format, be careful to include all pertinent information and dates.)

3) Combination: The body of this type of resume uses parts of both functional and chronological resumes.
Use when:
You have acquired several skills while progressing on one or several jobs and you want to highlight specific ones.
4) Targeted: A targeted resume focuses on specific abilities and duties that directly relate to a specific job.

Use when:

You apply specifically for one position and must show your qualifications meet the job’s specified qualifications.
The Targeted resume is a must in today’s environment. With Applicant Tracking Systems in use, targeting your resume for each ad you answer is essential. With a targeted resume, you can use any resume format.

Resume Fonts

The typeface you choose for your resume is very important. Your resume needs to be as clear and concise as possible. It also must be read on many types of devices from desktops to mobile phones. Sans-serif typefaces like Arial are best for small screens and the easiest on all screens. Make sure your resume is easily readable. Research shows that hiring managers and recruiters scan resumes for 6-8 seconds.

Typing in “sans-serif fonts” on your computer will give you a complete list, but here are some of the most common:

Arial
Arial Narrow
Book Antiqua
Calibri
Cambria
Didot
Garamond
Trebuchet MS
Times New Roman
Verdana

Resume Basics

Remember, your resume is your marketing piece, not your autobiography. It is your chance to call attention to you and what you’ve done. You must be careful to be specific, concise and to the point. You want the hiring manager to want to learn more about you. It is not a list of your current and past job descriptions. It is a list of things you have done that will get you to the position you want.

It should tell enough about you so someone will want to meet you but not enough about you so that you can be eliminated from a search.
Everyone has a preferred resume format. Make sure you are comfortable with the one you use and that it clearly shows all the required information.

Some job facts:

You should be getting five or six interviews from every 100 targeted resumes you send out. (Targeted resumes are written with the job description/ad in mind.) If you are not, that might be because you sent out resumes to every ad you see, whether the job fits or not. Also, have someone review your resume to make sure it’s clear about what you are looking for and it doesn’t contain any typos.

For every eight first interviews, you should get a second interview. If not, ask yourself if you must polish your interviewing skills. Are you coming across as desperate or unsure?

Have you ever been a finalist for more than eight or nine positions and not landed a job? If so, review what happened. If the companies hired from within, there isn’t anything you could have done. If the company decided not to hire anyone, there isn’t anything you could have done. But to get this far this many times and not have closed the deal suggests something is wrong. For starters, review your references. Are you giving them enough information so they can be helpful? Consider adding new ones to the list. Sometimes, the references’ personalities also make a big difference; they might not respond well to the questions asked.

What Goes on Your Resume and What Doesn’t?

To start off, review what does and what does not go on a resume. It may sound basic, but many resumes don’t follow the rules. If you have been in the workforce and not looking for your first job, here’s what you resume should and should not include:
What to Put on Your Resume

1. Your name, address, telephone numbers and email address. Identify your phone numbers if you are putting more than one (cell, business, message etc.) If you are looking for a job out of town where you have a residence or a place to stay, leave off your address or use the address at the location. Remember to check regularly the email and voice mail you list.
2. In your description, put the company/agency name with a short explanation of the nature of the organization. Hiring managers might not be familiar with your employer or you may be working in a specific product unit of a large conglomerate.
3. If you are working for an agency, list your clients or expertise within a specific industry.
4. Under education, list the school, degree and dates. You might not want to put your graduation dates fearing ageism will come into play. However, not having any dates makes your resume “suspicious” and can make you look even older than you are.
5. If you are fluent in language (s) or have knowledge of specific or technical computer programs, list them.
6. Current board/committee memberships or volunteer work show your interest in your field or in philanthropic areas. These should go on your resume.

What Not to Put on Your Resume

1. Don’t list any personal information such as birthdays, marital status etc. While this is common practice outside the U.S., it is not legal here.
2. Keep the names of your references on a separate sheet and provide them when asked. First, you don’t want to give out personal information or put it online. Second, always contact your references before they get a call to tell them who will be calling and the nature of the job.
3. Salary information does not belong on the resume. In some US states it is now illegal for an employer to ask your salary history.
4. Do not include activities that are not relevant. For example, long lists of past boards/committees or sports that do not pertain to your job search should not be included.
5. Do not include, “References available on request.” It is taken for granted an applicant has references.
Resume Objective/Summary

Among the most difficult parts of the resume seems to be the Objective or Summary. Here are some tips to help you decide which one to use and what to include:

Use an Objective if you are looking for a specific opportunity or an opportunity within a specific discipline.

Examples:

  • A senior-level communications position within a global consumer company.
  • Social and digital media specialist position within a healthcare agency.
  • Interested in furthering my career with an agency that focuses on international direct marketing.

Summary paragraphs are better for experienced, multi-disciplined professionals.

Examples:

  • Extensive management experience in integrated marketing, including work with a global consumer products company and a major services company.
  • Over 10 years of public relations experience with a special emphasis directing media relations, social media, crisis and issues management and financial communications.

Fifteen years of experience in communications. Specialties include investor relations, public policy issues and crisis communications.

When Writing Your Objective/Summary Statement, remember:

1. It’s okay to have one.
2. If you use an objective, it must be as specific as possible.
3. Since the objective of a resume is to find employment don’t say that in your statement.
4. Summary statements should be brief and to-the-point, ideally two to three sentences. Statements should contain the information you want the reader to see and include the discipline/keywords you want to highlight.
5. If you decide to use an Objective or Summary statement, it will set the tone for what you highlight in the Experience Section of your resume. Think it through and be comfortable with it. You are selling yourself to someone who doesn’t know you. What do you want to highlight? What will interest them enough to invite you in for a call?

When writing your resume:

1. Eliminate pronouns. Resumes should not contain I, he/she. They are written as if you are the subject.
2. Keep it short; a person is scanning this resume not an ATS.
3. Eliminate buzz words but use appropriate industry terms.
4. Sell yourself. Tailor your summary to the position.
5. Don’t include non sequitur or relevant information.
6. Do not list specifics.
7. Use bullets when possible to make it easier to scan.
8. Avoid jargon.
9. Don’t exaggerate.
10. Don’t include personal information.

Words Not To Use on Your Resume:

Eliminate unnecessary words and, words that don’t add anything (very, rather, quite), describe anything or showcase your writing ability. Buzz words no longer are acceptable in communication resumes. If you see any of the words below in your resume, delete them. Ask yourself why are they in your resume and can you support their use? Be clear and concise; use only meaningful words.

Extensive experience
Innovative
Motivated
Results-oriented
Dynamic
Team Player
Fast-paced
Problem solver
Entrepreneurial
Liaison
Business-savvy
Interface with
Aptitude for
Works well with
Good communications skills
Measureable results
Good work ethic
Bottom-line oriented
Specialized
Leadership
Passionate
Strategic
Experienced
Focused
Expert
Certified
Creative
Excellent

Words To Add To Your Resume:

Directed
Handled
Created
Initiated
Achieved
Spearheaded
Maximized
Innovated
Increased
Implemented
Generated
Exceeded
Quantified
Negotiated
Organized
Pioneered
Presented
Reviewed
Strengthened
Trained
Collaborated

Customizing Your Resume

You want to tailor your resume to get the interview. You can’t please everyone with one resume. Each hiring manager/recruiter looks for something different. It is important to customize your resume for each job. It might sound tedious and time-consuming but with a few tips you can do it.

When answering an ad or reviewing a job description:

1. Hunt for keywords. Watch for keywords like external relations, digital marketing and note how often they were mentioned. The more an ad or job description mentions a specific keyword, the more important it is and you should add it more than once.
2. Look for job skills. While keywords are usually the disciplines, the job skills will further define responsibilities such as managing, supervising, writing/editing.
3. Identify the most important keywords and see if you can add an accomplishment to them.

Last Step: Sending Your Resume

Knowing how to name your resume is extremely important. Personalize your file by adding your name – MarieRapertoResume

Job hunting now is a digital world. It doesn’t matter if you are answering an ad online or sending an email to human resources or a recruiter. Since sending your resume with a generic name can cause it to be overlooked or lost in the system, be professional and make sure you name it properly. You want hiring managers to know it’s your resume and to make it easier to track through their email system.

Remember to be consistent and use the same style for the resume name, cover letter or sample documents.

You may capitalize words, use spaces or dashes. Don’t use a version number. You don’t want to give the impression you keep changing your resume even though you must customize it. You can use your computer to keep track of different versions and adapt them as needed.




Buzzwords: 10 Words To Eliminate From Your Resume/Profile

Buzzwords: 10 Words To Eliminate From Your Resume/ProfileMarie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

Buzzwords should be eliminated from your resume, online profiles and cover letters.  These words add nothing to your brand and can distract a reader from the more important facts.  What are buzzwords?  Basically, overused words that do not describe what you do.  You may think you are a team-player but that’s your opinion.  How you describe what you have done in your career will determine if you are or not.   Get ready to clean up your resume.

LinkedIn recently put together a list of the most overused words in their online profiles.  They are:

  • Specialized
  • Leadership
  • Passionate
  • Strategic
  • Experienced
  • Focused
  • Expert
  • Certified
  • Creative
  • Excellent

You want to standout so using words that everyone else does won’t help and will keep you from having a concise, easy-to-read resume or profile.

Start deleting!

 




Your Resume: 10 Items To Remove Immediately

Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

Resumes are extremely hard to write.  As you begin the resume creation process, you must decide if you want the same type of job or something different.  This will determine what skills you will list, how long it will be, etc.  What you don’t want your resume to be is a job description of everything you have done over your entire career.  While a professional can work with you to eliminate items and help you focus on what should be Your Resume: 10 Items To Remove Immediatelyincluded,  you are the one who ultimately must decide what represents you.  Here are some general rules to follow on what you should eliminate from your resume:

  1.  Non-applicable items.  Today, you need to customize your resume for every job.  You want to highlight the keywords and disciplines an employer is looking for and be as concise as possible.  You must review your resume and eliminate or limit the information on items not required.
  2. Past jobs.  You will probably get a new position based on the work you have done in your last two jobs.  Your past work history is important, but what you did ten years ago is not.  The company, job title and dates may be all you need.
  3. Statements.  Your resume statement must reflect the job you want, and not be general.  It also needs to be short and concise, for the reader to scan it quickly.  Two to three lines, maximum.
  4. Images.  Charts, graphs and boxes don’t scan well and disrupt the reader’s attention.  Your resume must be easy to read/scan and not crowded with images.  This goes for colors, mixed fonts and clip art.  Remember, U.S. resumes should not have your picture.
  5. References.  The names of references should never be on a resume and “References Upon Request” is outdated and should not be used.
  6. Interests.  While interests and hobbies can strike up a conversation with an interviewer, they should be kept to a minimum and used only early in your career.
  7. Education.  The basic information only, unless you are an entry-level candidate.
  8. Addendum pages.  You may have extra information on addendum pages.  These should not be included when submitting your resume.  The can be used if an employer asks for additional information or during the interview process.
  9. Social Media.  While some candidates list their LinkedIn profile to provide additional information, your other social media addresses are not necessary.
  10. Jargon.  Employers have become very critical of jargon in resumes.  Use words that describe what you do, not ones like trustworthy, team-player, results-oriented.

Just keep it clean and readable!




Your Six Seconds: 3 Ways To Get Your Resume Read

marie-rapertoBy Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

Your six seconds, what does that mean?  Studies have shown that hiring managers/recruiters scan your resume and they scan it for 6 seconds.  It’s scary to think that a decision will be made in that short time frame.  That’s not a lot of time but, as a recruiter, I can tell you that it’s enough to get an impression of the candidate.  Whether it’s less than six or more, it still means that you have to get your message across quickly and targeted to the reader.  So what can you do?  Here are  things that you can do to make your six seconds count.

1.  Make your resume readable.  Your resume must be clear on a desktop, a phone or a tablet.  It must be readable – lots of white space, a nice sized font, not crammed and not too long.  In most instances, only the top third of your resume will be scanned.

2.  Your resume must highlight your skills.  The keywords reflecting the job requirements from the ad or description MUST be in your resume and they should be in the first third of it to ensure they will be seen.

3.  Don’t look like a job hopper.  If you were laid-off and are freelancing, make sure your resume is clear on that.  If you are in a long-term temp assignment, put (Contract Assignment) after the title.  Have a gap?  Use a short explanation – maternity leave,  parental care leave etc., if you can.

You want to show that you have the skills to do the job and not have anything pull from those skills.  Keep it simple.  If you pass the one-third scan, you will make it to the next round.

 




The Perfect Resume: 3 Tips For Customizing Yours

Send-ResumeBy Marie Raperto, The Hiring Hub

The perfect resume is everyone’s dream.  Tailoring your resume so you get the interview is what you want to do, but it’s not easy.  Every one is scanning resumes.  Applicant tracking systems scan for keywords, hiring managers are scanning for relevant skills.  You can’t please everyone with one resume.  Each hiring manager/recruiter could be looking for something different.  That’s why it’s so important to customize your resume for each posting.  It might sound tedious and time-consuming but with a few tips you can get it done easily.  When answering an ad or reviewing a job description:

1.  Hunt for keywords.  Watch for keywords like external relations, digital marketing etc. and also note how many times they were mentioned.

2.  Look for job skills.  While keywords are usually the disciplines (media relations, internal communications etc.), the job skills will further define responsibilities,  such as manage digital campaigns, supervise a team, write/edit materials etc.

Now add these to your resume.  If a keyword is mentioned several times, make sure you add it more than once.   The more the ad or description mentions a specific keyword, the more important it is.

3.  Pick the most important keywords and see if you can add an accomplishment to it.  Make sure you are specific.  You want to show that you can do it!

A fun thing to try is to put your current resume in a free online word cloud generator.  See what words are highlighted before and after you customize your resume.  You can search online for these programs (www.wordclouds.com/www.wordel.net).  There a many of them to try.




What’s In A Name? How To Name Your Resume And Cover Letter

Send-ResumeKnowing how to name your resume and cover letter is extremely important.  It’s a digital world when it comes to job hunting.  It doesn’t matter if your are answering an ad online, emailing HR or a recruiter.  Sending your resume with a generic name can cause it to be overlooked or lost in the system.  Be professional and make sure you name it properly.  You want hiring managers to know it’s your resume and make it easier to track through their email system.

1.  Personalize your file by adding your name – MarieRapertoResume or MarieRapertoCoverLetter.

2.  Remember to be consistent and use the same style for the resume name, cover letter or sample documents.

3  You can capitalize words, use spaces or dashes.

4.  Don’t use a version number.  It can give the impression that you are using different versions for different jobs or that you keep changing your resume.  You can use your computer to keep track of different versions.

Remember, every step of your job search must present you as the ultimate professional.

 




Typefaces: 10 Best Resume Fonts

Resume Summary TipsThe typeface you choose for your resume is very important.  Your resume needs to be clear and concise as possible.  It also must be read on many types of devices from desktops to mobile phones.  Sans-serif typefaces are best for small screens and the easiest to read on all screens.  Make sure your resume is readable as research shows that hiring managers and recruiters only scan resumes for 6-8 seconds.  Typing in sans-serif fonts on your computer will give you a complete list,  but here are some of the most common:

Calibri

Times New Roman

Arial

Verdana

Cambria

Garamond

Book Antiqua

Trebuchet MS

Arial Narrow

Didot

Here’s to an easy-to-read resume!